Next Insurance Unveils Two New Products for Small Business Commercial Auto Coverage

Next Insurance

Next Insurance has announced the launch of two new products catering to small business commercial auto coverage. The offering comes with tools and equipment insurance and upgraded commercial auto coverage.

the launch of the products is part of the company’s quest to be a one-stop-shop for insurance coverage for self-employed and small businesses. In a bid to be more accessible Next Insurance is offering the services online to reach customers.

Next Insurance Small Business Auto Coverage

“Next Insurance aims to simplify insurance for small businesses by bringing all their needs under one roof. Launching Tools and Equipment and bolstering commercial auto coverage for vehicles that businesses don’t own, is yet another step towards becoming the one-stop-shop for all small businesses,” said Guy Goldstein, co-founder and CEO of Next Insurance.

The company says it provides insurance solutions for 1,000 types of small businesses. Businesses looking for quotes it says ‘can get a quote and get covered in 10 minutes or less’. This includes access to live certificates of insurance for businesses seeking documentation.

The secret according to the company is it uses Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to simplify the purchasing process for customers. This in return it says brings down the costs by 30% compared to traditional policy processing.

Helping Small Businesses Mitigate Risks

According to the insurance tech firm, the tools and equipment policy is great for contractors and cleaning service providers. With it, contractors can seek indemnity following theft, loss, or damages to pay for replacements or even repairs. It covers tools and equipment both owned and borrowed including employees’ tools and clothing.

This can come in handy for businesses that rely on equipment and tools for their normal business operations. Losses or damages of these tools could mean delays in completing contracts or even loss of business.

The tools and equipment insurance comes as an added option to Next Insurance’s general liability insurance. Basic tools and equipment coverage plans can start at $12.50 a month. Policies for tools and equipment are available in 48 states across the nation.

The auto insurance policy coverage applies for both Hired and Non-Owned Auto (HNOA). This upgraded auto insurance policy tries to cover the business’ liabilities during operations. It covers property damage and bodily injuries caused while operating rented vehicles or when an employee’s personal vehicle while working.

In the event of a lawsuit, HNOA will cover defense costs and any judgments up to the policy limit. This coverage comes as an add-on to commercial auto policies and will roll out later this month.

Why Businesses Need Insurance Coverage

Simply put business insurance provides an additional tier of protection for small businesses. With it, they can help cover costs associated with property damage and liability claims. Without a business insurance business owners risk having to pay out-of-pocket in the event damages occur or legal claims crop up.

Costs from damages and legal claims can be so high businesses can’t survive after paying them. In certain cases, businesses may not even be able to afford to pay them at all.

Prudent entrepreneurs know that one of the first things they need to do when they start a business is to purchase insurance. They need to protect themselves from unintended risks such as auto accidents, fires, theft, business interruptions and other risks. They see insurance as a necessary expense similar to rent, utilities and salaries. Insurance coverage in some circumstances is required by other outside third parties outside your business such as your bank.

There are many types of business insurance available in the market. Most businesses opt for a general liability insurance policy for their business. Basically, this is an umbrella insurance coverage policy. It helps protect your business from a variety of claims that includes bodily injury, property damage, personal injury and others. The key is to know your specific business insurance needs. Similarly, there are required insurance policies your business needs to have as mandated by law. Unemployment insurance and healthcare coverage are two examples.

Though insurance policies are often similar it is important for businesses to research which insurance provider gives them the best deal. Because of the sheer number of providers in the market, take your time before you buy a policy.

Image: nextinsurance.com

This article, "Next Insurance Unveils Two New Products for Small Business Commercial Auto Coverage" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Next Insurance Unveils Two New Products for Small Business Commercial Auto Coverage

Next Insurance

Next Insurance has announced the launch of two new products catering to small business commercial auto coverage. The offering comes with tools and equipment insurance and upgraded commercial auto coverage.

the launch of the products is part of the company’s quest to be a one-stop-shop for insurance coverage for self-employed and small businesses. In a bid to be more accessible Next Insurance is offering the services online to reach customers.

Next Insurance Small Business Auto Coverage

“Next Insurance aims to simplify insurance for small businesses by bringing all their needs under one roof. Launching Tools and Equipment and bolstering commercial auto coverage for vehicles that businesses don’t own, is yet another step towards becoming the one-stop-shop for all small businesses,” said Guy Goldstein, co-founder and CEO of Next Insurance.

The company says it provides insurance solutions for 1,000 types of small businesses. Businesses looking for quotes it says ‘can get a quote and get covered in 10 minutes or less’. This includes access to live certificates of insurance for businesses seeking documentation.

The secret according to the company is it uses Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to simplify the purchasing process for customers. This in return it says brings down the costs by 30% compared to traditional policy processing.

Helping Small Businesses Mitigate Risks

According to the insurance tech firm, the tools and equipment policy is great for contractors and cleaning service providers. With it, contractors can seek indemnity following theft, loss, or damages to pay for replacements or even repairs. It covers tools and equipment both owned and borrowed including employees’ tools and clothing.

This can come in handy for businesses that rely on equipment and tools for their normal business operations. Losses or damages of these tools could mean delays in completing contracts or even loss of business.

The tools and equipment insurance comes as an added option to Next Insurance’s general liability insurance. Basic tools and equipment coverage plans can start at $12.50 a month. Policies for tools and equipment are available in 48 states across the nation.

The auto insurance policy coverage applies for both Hired and Non-Owned Auto (HNOA). This upgraded auto insurance policy tries to cover the business’ liabilities during operations. It covers property damage and bodily injuries caused while operating rented vehicles or when an employee’s personal vehicle while working.

In the event of a lawsuit, HNOA will cover defense costs and any judgments up to the policy limit. This coverage comes as an add-on to commercial auto policies and will roll out later this month.

Why Businesses Need Insurance Coverage

Simply put business insurance provides an additional tier of protection for small businesses. With it, they can help cover costs associated with property damage and liability claims. Without a business insurance business owners risk having to pay out-of-pocket in the event damages occur or legal claims crop up.

Costs from damages and legal claims can be so high businesses can’t survive after paying them. In certain cases, businesses may not even be able to afford to pay them at all.

Prudent entrepreneurs know that one of the first things they need to do when they start a business is to purchase insurance. They need to protect themselves from unintended risks such as auto accidents, fires, theft, business interruptions and other risks. They see insurance as a necessary expense similar to rent, utilities and salaries. Insurance coverage in some circumstances is required by other outside third parties outside your business such as your bank.

There are many types of business insurance available in the market. Most businesses opt for a general liability insurance policy for their business. Basically, this is an umbrella insurance coverage policy. It helps protect your business from a variety of claims that includes bodily injury, property damage, personal injury and others. The key is to know your specific business insurance needs. Similarly, there are required insurance policies your business needs to have as mandated by law. Unemployment insurance and healthcare coverage are two examples.

Though insurance policies are often similar it is important for businesses to research which insurance provider gives them the best deal. Because of the sheer number of providers in the market, take your time before you buy a policy.

Image: nextinsurance.com

This article, "Next Insurance Unveils Two New Products for Small Business Commercial Auto Coverage" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Slack Etiquette: Become a Slack Pro in No Time

Online communication has always been an essential part of business operations. However, it became far more crucial during the last couple of months. Given the world’s current situation, many companies had to send their employees home to work remotely.

Slack app dashboard

With the growth of the remote work trend came the growing demand for better online communication platforms. As one of the best platforms of this kind, Slack proved that its features are more than enough to maintain meaningful and productive communication within remote teams.

Why Choose Slack

Before getting into details with Slack etiquette and how to best leverage the platform, let’s cover the basics.…

The post Slack Etiquette: Become a Slack Pro in No Time appeared first on SMALL BUSINESS CEO.



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How Broadcast Journalism Helped Me Pivot to Social Media Management

Pivoting from a career in broadcast journalism was a big decision for me.

I loved everything about a newsroom environment: the breaking news, researching topics, identifying sources for stories, and feeling like I had a pulse on trends and issues taking place in the world.

I was successful at it, too. In fact, I worked at some of the biggest news corporations in the world, including CNN, ABC News, CBSLA and others.

However, at some point — because I was spending so much time on social media listening for breaking news and looking for story ideas — my interest in social media evolved.

I knew I wanted to make a transition, but I was scared of taking a leap and pivoting to social media marketing.

Today, I can tell you that I'm so happy I did. I learned that my job is not my entire identity, and through journalism, I have so many transferrable skills to thrive in any industry.

Switching careers can feel exciting, but comes with feelings of self-doubt and anxiety.

Here, I want to highlight how broadcast journalism helped me succeed in social media, and tips you can use if you're considering a career shift of your own.

7 Takeaways From Journalism You Can Apply to Social Media

1. Ask the 5 W questions.

Who? What? Where? When? and Why? These questions are ingrained in any journalist.

The foundational questions to news gathering also apply in the context of content creation, marketing plans, and any content strategy. For instance, any marketer likely asks these questions daily:

Who is this message for?

What is the core message we want them to take away from this?

When (and where) are they most likely to be to consume this message?

Why should they care?

"Why" also goes a little deeper in social media. The internet is flooded with information and it's your job to capture someone's attention — and hold their attention for your content.

Why would someone click on this ad?

Why are we targeting this group?

Why is it important that they see this message?

The root of these questions have helped me cut through the jargon of promotions and company announcements to get to the root of the message in the simplest words.

Pro Tip: In journalism school, I learned to simplify the facts by "explaining this story to my mom." This framework has really helped me simplify information down to its core. I practice this often when trying to take a complex company announcement and whittle it down to its simplest takeaway.

2. Focus on the core story, not the details.

When it comes to creating content, journalists have a unique element they bring to the table: storytelling.

Some people may get caught up in numbers, the tagline, a paragraph in an announcement, and so on.

As a former journalist, I think about the core of the message we want to convey in a social post.

The key takeaway could involve visual elements and emotional triggers, but its foundation will include a concise message or story.

3. Keep up-to-date on industry and competitor trends.

The advantage journalism has provided me when it comes to conducting research is that, even if you have an intuitive sense of your audience, your journalism instincts still compel you to "look into it" and confirm your hypothesis.

For instance, for conducing market research — including what my audience is feeling, thinking, struggling with, dreaming of, reading about, etc. — I put my "investigative" hat on and look within Facebook Groups, or other websites where people can leave comments or questions (such as Quora or Amazon reviews) to gather information about what my audience is seeing, thinking, and feeling.

Additionally, a couple of keyword searches gives me a framework to work with while doing research.

Referring to the latest studies, trends, and reports helps me identify any overlaps and enables me to be a successful social media professional because I keep a pulse on issues that are top-of-mind to my audience.

A little research goes a long way in social media content and writing.

Journalists are naturally curious people, so we sometimes find ourselves entertained by trends and topics that get people talking. We like to quickly parachute in on behavior like this and figure out what the hype is all about, source who started it, and figure out why it's taking off.

It's amusing, to say the least, but this innate skill in journalists has helped me in social media because I can (for the most part) keep up with the latest memes, videos, or other trending news that's popular that day or week. It also helps me recall previous news events or trends that were popular in the past.

Context of topics, audiences, and trends helps me while making editorial or marketing decisions and creating content.

4. Create quality content, even with minimal assets.

When it comes to content creation, journalists have had to work with little or major constraints when it comes to telling a story. You might have only a few usable sound bites, poor video quality, or you're working with only sound.

Broadcast journalism helped me feel comfortable with improvising and maximizing any assets available.

I learned how to do video, audio and photography editing. I learned different storytelling formats such as radio, TV, print, and online, as well as how to distinguish each piece (i.e. infographic, video, blog post, listicle) and how to adapt them to different social media platforms.

I learned to do this in the most concise way possible, which helped me tremendously while writing short headlines and easy-to-understand text that includes a call to action.

5. Write concisely, and make every word count.

Whether it's copywriting, writing in a brand's voice, creating catchy headlines and titles, creating copy that converts a user, incorporating a call-to-action, or enticing a reader to learn more … it's all important in social media.

Broadcast journalism helped my social media career with my writing skills alone. Ultimately, packaging information in a concise way is so important in social media.

Twitter has a 280 character limit. However, I'm proud that I learned how to write tweets when it had a 140-character limit — including character counts toward photos, videos, and GIFs that were attached!

Brevity is always a best practice when it comes to writing on social media, and broadcast journalism has helped me succeed in that regard.

Effective writing helps your audience understand you, what you offer, and your value and is a critical skill for attracting an online audience.

Pro Tip: Practice reading your words out loud to catch typos or awkward sentence structures. I learned this while writing copy for TV news and it has helped me tremendously while crafting social media posts.

6. Learn how to communicate effectively in crises. 

Social media is an extension of any brand, and understanding when something is a reputational risk is important.

My career in broadcast journalism helped me identify potential pitfalls or anticipate remarks people might make. The last thing I want to do is appear tone-deaf or miss the mark with marketing messages.

Working in broadcast journalism has trained me to never lower my guard and always keep my eyes open for threats or liabilities in social posts, marketing campaigns, and imagery.

I also understand news cycles, and during a crisis, I've learned how to evolve and adapt to new circumstances and information.

For example, during a crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic, there were different phases of crisis communication companies needed to understand. It was important to pause, pivot marketing and messaging, and identify pain points and re-position your brand, among other things.

Working with so many PR and marketing professionals over the years taught me about how to "own the narrative" of a brand's story and to serve as a brand steward on social media.

7. Stay resourceful and help your audience find answers to their needs.

I say I'm a digital content strategist, but really, I'm a professional problem-solver.

If I don't have an answer, I'll either find the answer or find someone who does.

Broadcast journalism taught me to be resourceful, help my audience with valuable and actionable information, and think quickly on my feet and pitch smart angles.

I've come across so many random scenarios while working in social media, including:

  • Converting and transferring files
  • Helping people with their wifi
  • Syncing folders on Sharepoint
  • Identifying fonts
  • Pitching a story on behalf of the company
  • Finding alternative channel or format to communicate a message
  • Sourcing video to its original owner

You name it, I've probably helped someone figure something out, and because of it, I'm an invaluable asset to my team and my company.

I solve people's problems (in person and online) which makes me feel like I'm doing a great social service.

Journalists have a big opportunity in the marketing, social media, content strategy, storytelling and advertising space — if you are on the fence, I encourage you to take the leap.



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2 out of 3 of Consumers Would Buy from Companies Who Now Offer “Contactless” Payment Options

Contactless Payment Options

More than two thirds of customers say they would switch to businesses now offering contactless payment options. Over three quarters of consumers say they have changed how they pay, due, in part, to the COVID-19 pandemic.

These statistics were unveiled by a new report by Visa. The report shows that 75% of small business owners are optimistic about the future of business.

Visa Contactless Payments Survey

Visa’s ‘Back to Business’ study is part of a series of initiatives by Visa. The initiatives are designed to provide small businesses with tools and resources to build a stronger business. The survey asked 250 small business owners around the world their thoughts on business operations in a post-COVID world. The study also surveyed 1,000 adult consumers about their payment and shopping habits in the current climate.

Changing Methods of Payments

A key finding was the changing payment demands of consumers and the emphasis on contactless payment. This finding is important, as it reiterates the need for businesses to offer contactless payment options to reach consumer demand.

Speaking about changing consumer requirements and how businesses should adopt, Suzan Kereere, Visa’s global head of merchant sales, said:

“Consumers are putting COVID-19 safety measures at the top of their shopping lists and rewarding businesses that do the same.

“Historically, we see behavior change at the point of sale as a gradual shift over time. But, COVID-19 has created an immediate need for safer, more efficient shopping experiences both on and offline and consumers are responding by rapidly migrating to digital commerce.

“We want small businesses to know that Visa is here to help them navigate these new consumer needs and expectations, which will make their businesses stronger now and in the long run,” Kereere continued.

Contactless Payments are a Priority Among Consumers

About 46% of consumers believe using contactless payment methods is among the most important safety measures for retailers to follow. And 48% of consumers say they would refuse to shop at stores that only offer payment methods requiring contact with cashiers.

The survey also found that almost four out of five consumers admit to having made changes to the way they pay. Almost half (49%) said they shop online when possible. And 48% use contactless payments, and 46% don’t use as much cash.

Also, 70% of customers say they have used a new shopping or payment method for the first time in the wake of the pandemic. And 26% have used tap to pay for in-store purchases while 34% say they have shopped for groceries or household items online.

Small Business Optimism Despite the Challenges

Despite changing consumer shopping and payment habits, small businesses remain optimistic about the future of business. The survey found that 75% of small businesses have a positive attitude about the future. That said, business owners recognize there will be challenges ahead.

The survey found 52% of the business owners surveyed said revenue declines were among their biggest concern. And 46% are most worried about attracting new customers. 22% of small business owners are having to reduce salaries because of the current conditions.

The key takeaway of Visa’s report is that small businesses must be aware of and adjust to fluctuating consumer demands.

Offering contactless forms of payment should be a priority for retailers if they are to meet consumer demands. Businesses who fail to keep up with the needs of customers run the risk of losing out on business.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "2 out of 3 of Consumers Would Buy from Companies Who Now Offer “Contactless” Payment Options" was first published on Small Business Trends



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2 out of 3 of Consumers Would Buy from Companies Who Now Offer “Contactless” Payment Options

Contactless Payment Options

More than two thirds of customers say they would switch to businesses now offering contactless payment options. Over three quarters of consumers say they have changed how they pay, due, in part, to the COVID-19 pandemic.

These statistics were unveiled by a new report by Visa. The report shows that 75% of small business owners are optimistic about the future of business.

Visa Contactless Payments Survey

Visa’s ‘Back to Business’ study is part of a series of initiatives by Visa. The initiatives are designed to provide small businesses with tools and resources to build a stronger business. The survey asked 250 small business owners around the world their thoughts on business operations in a post-COVID world. The study also surveyed 1,000 adult consumers about their payment and shopping habits in the current climate.

Changing Methods of Payments

A key finding was the changing payment demands of consumers and the emphasis on contactless payment. This finding is important, as it reiterates the need for businesses to offer contactless payment options to reach consumer demand.

Speaking about changing consumer requirements and how businesses should adopt, Suzan Kereere, Visa’s global head of merchant sales, said:

“Consumers are putting COVID-19 safety measures at the top of their shopping lists and rewarding businesses that do the same.

“Historically, we see behavior change at the point of sale as a gradual shift over time. But, COVID-19 has created an immediate need for safer, more efficient shopping experiences both on and offline and consumers are responding by rapidly migrating to digital commerce.

“We want small businesses to know that Visa is here to help them navigate these new consumer needs and expectations, which will make their businesses stronger now and in the long run,” Kereere continued.

Contactless Payments are a Priority Among Consumers

About 46% of consumers believe using contactless payment methods is among the most important safety measures for retailers to follow. And 48% of consumers say they would refuse to shop at stores that only offer payment methods requiring contact with cashiers.

The survey also found that almost four out of five consumers admit to having made changes to the way they pay. Almost half (49%) said they shop online when possible. And 48% use contactless payments, and 46% don’t use as much cash.

Also, 70% of customers say they have used a new shopping or payment method for the first time in the wake of the pandemic. And 26% have used tap to pay for in-store purchases while 34% say they have shopped for groceries or household items online.

Small Business Optimism Despite the Challenges

Despite changing consumer shopping and payment habits, small businesses remain optimistic about the future of business. The survey found that 75% of small businesses have a positive attitude about the future. That said, business owners recognize there will be challenges ahead.

The survey found 52% of the business owners surveyed said revenue declines were among their biggest concern. And 46% are most worried about attracting new customers. 22% of small business owners are having to reduce salaries because of the current conditions.

The key takeaway of Visa’s report is that small businesses must be aware of and adjust to fluctuating consumer demands.

Offering contactless forms of payment should be a priority for retailers if they are to meet consumer demands. Businesses who fail to keep up with the needs of customers run the risk of losing out on business.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "2 out of 3 of Consumers Would Buy from Companies Who Now Offer “Contactless” Payment Options" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Digital Marketing Strategies for Rehabilitation Centers

Addiction has become such a huge problem in every country on the planet. Whether it is an alcohol or drug addiction, a gambling addiction, or an addiction to sex, reaching out and helping addicts to overcome their demons is more important now than ever. Rehabilitation centers, like every other kind of business, need to employ the right digital marketing strategy to ensure that their potential patients are aware that there is help out there.

Digital marketing

These days your business’ website is key to customer outreach and engagement, whether your business is a rehabilitation center or a global corporation. Improving your online presence and increasing website traffic is not an easy task, but to maximize your potential engagement with people who need your help, it is absolutely vital.…

The post Digital Marketing Strategies for Rehabilitation Centers appeared first on SMALL BUSINESS CEO.



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