Early Easter, Cold and Snow Hurt April Retail Sales, Report Says

RetailNext Retail Performance Pulse April 2018

Cold weather, snow storms and an early Easter Holiday did their part to fuel a drop in retail traffic in April (7.8%) that in turn decreased sales by 5.6% for the same period year over year.  The findings were part of the RetailNext Retail Performance Pulse report, a performance review for brick and mortar retail stores in the U.S.

RetailNext Retail Performance Pulse April 2018

Declines in Traffic and Sales

The declines in traffic and sales were partially offset by a 0.9 point upward swing in conversion, measured by calculating sales transactions as a percentage of traffic. This metric has been riding a positive trend for six of the last seven months.

The current year over year report compared the period of April 9 through May 6, 2017 to April 8 through May 5, 2018. Seven million shipping trips in the continental United States were analyzed.

Best Numbers

April experienced its best numbers during the third week of the month. Three important metrics — conversion, net sales and average transaction value — were up for that week. April saw it best sales day Saturday, April 28 while reached its highest point Thursday, April 26.

Traffic hit its lowest point on Monday, April 16.

Regionally

Regionally, the Northeast saw sales drop 4.1% year over year and traffic decrease 9.3%. The Midwest experienced a sales decrease of 8.2%, the worst for any region. The West saw sales and traffic dip at 6.4% and 7.7% respectively.

The South didn’t do any better with the second-highest sales decline (6.9%) and traffic numbers that dropped by 5.6%.

RetailNext uses SaaS software to collect and analyze shopper’s data. They have their headquarters in San Jose, CA. Over 300 retailers in 60 different countries have adopted their analytics platform.

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Early Easter, Cold and Snow Hurt April Retail Sales, Report Says" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Early Easter, Cold and Snow Hurt April Retail Sales, Report Says

RetailNext Retail Performance Pulse April 2018

Cold weather, snow storms and an early Easter Holiday did their part to fuel a drop in retail traffic in April (7.8%) that in turn decreased sales by 5.6% for the same period year over year.  The findings were part of the RetailNext Retail Performance Pulse report, a performance review for brick and mortar retail stores in the U.S.

RetailNext Retail Performance Pulse April 2018

Declines in Traffic and Sales

The declines in traffic and sales were partially offset by a 0.9 point upward swing in conversion, measured by calculating sales transactions as a percentage of traffic. This metric has been riding a positive trend for six of the last seven months.

The current year over year report compared the period of April 9 through May 6, 2017 to April 8 through May 5, 2018. Seven million shipping trips in the continental United States were analyzed.

Best Numbers

April experienced its best numbers during the third week of the month. Three important metrics — conversion, net sales and average transaction value — were up for that week. April saw it best sales day Saturday, April 28 while reached its highest point Thursday, April 26.

Traffic hit its lowest point on Monday, April 16.

Regionally

Regionally, the Northeast saw sales drop 4.1% year over year and traffic decrease 9.3%. The Midwest experienced a sales decrease of 8.2%, the worst for any region. The West saw sales and traffic dip at 6.4% and 7.7% respectively.

The South didn’t do any better with the second-highest sales decline (6.9%) and traffic numbers that dropped by 5.6%.

RetailNext uses SaaS software to collect and analyze shopper’s data. They have their headquarters in San Jose, CA. Over 300 retailers in 60 different countries have adopted their analytics platform.

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Early Easter, Cold and Snow Hurt April Retail Sales, Report Says" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

5 Steps for Planning a Seasonal Marketing Campaign

The lowdown on when and how to plan a seasonal marketing campaign that will deliver results for your brand.

Seasonal marketing campaigns are not just about Christmas because, as you will see from this whistle-stop 5-step course, there is so much more choice when it comes to hopping on the seasonal campaign bandwagon…

Seasonal marketing in Christmas

Step 1 – Identify the right seasonal opportunity for your brand

Before running and hitting every major commercial opportunity in the calendar, start with one seasonal opportunity. Identify one (or two) that sit most comfortably with your brand and one that people would expect to see from your business.…



RSS Business Feeds

Who will be the main loser from Europe’s new data-privacy law?

“PLEASE don’t leave us.” From the dozens of e-mails in people’s inboxes, begging them to give their consent to be sent further messages, you could deduce that the senders of newsletters and the like are hardest hit by the European Union’s tough new privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which goes into effect on May 25th. But the main loser may well be an industry that few have ever heard of but most have dealings with every day: advertising technology, or ad tech. In fact, the GDPR would probably not exist at all were it not for this collection of companies, which have an insatiable hunger for personal data.

Ad tech emerged because advertising is the internet’s default business model. Since targeted ads tend to be more efficient and targeting requires personal data (sites previously visited, searches in online stores and the like), these data became the fuel of a new industry to automate online advertising. It is so complex that even experts often resort to what is known...



via Business Feeds

Tailor shops are a thriving pocket of enterprise in Pyongyang

No ordinary fashion statement

WALK down the streets of Pyongyang, North Korea’s capital, and at first sight the passers-by look rather uniform. The women are in tidy skirt suits and medium-high heels. The men sport variations on the theme of the jacket and wide trousers preferred by Kim Jong Un, the country’s leader. Government-mandated lapel pins with portraits of one or both of Mr Kim’s predecessors continue to be ubiquitous. But look closer and a wealth of individual variations can be seen, particularly among the women: some bright-coloured lace stitched onto a jacket here, a daringly cut skirt in a sparkling satin material there.

Although fashion from China and even from—Kim forbid—South Korea is increasingly making its way to the markets of Pyongyang, many of these flourishes are the work of the city’s own tailors. They may be only a small subset of North Korea’s textile industry—which accounted for around 30% of exports before being hit by sanctions last autumn...



via Business Feeds

As Tesla’s share price falls, it becomes an inviting takeover target

A RECENT tweet from Elon Musk, the boss of Tesla, an electric-car firm, shows footage of a Model X undergoing rollover testing. The SUV is propelled rapidly sideways on a trolley before encountering a sand trap that stops it suddenly, tipping the car. The Tesla teeters between ending up on its roof or settling back on its wheels. It is an apt metaphor for a firm hovering between fulfilling its promise and succumbing to financial woes.

In April Adam Jonas of Morgan Stanley, a bank, said the next three months would be the “most critical time in Tesla’s history” since launching its upmarket Model S six years ago. The move from a niche in expensive electric cars to bringing battery power to the masses has been troublesome, to say the least. The firm had once hoped to be making 10,000 of its cheaper Model 3s a week by the end of 2018. But difficulties with a highly automated production line mean that just over 2,000 are rolling out of the factory each week. Even a revised goal of 5,000...



via Business Feeds

American firms reveal the gulf between bosses’ and workers’ pay

HOW much should company bosses be paid relative to their employees? It depends who you ask. Plato argued that the richest members of society should earn no more than four times the pay of the poorest. John Pierpont Morgan, a banker from America’s gilded age, reckoned that bosses should earn at most 20 times the pay of their underlings. Investors today hold chief executives in vastly higher esteem. According to new filings submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), America’s largest publicly listed firms (those worth at least $1bn) on average paid their chief executives 130 times more than their typical workers in 2017. The figures are being disclosed by firms in their financial filings for the first time this year.

The SEC’s new requirement to quantify the gap has its origins in the financial crisis. Facing populist outrage over the pay packages of Wall Street executives held responsible for triggering the crash, Congress added a provision to the Dodd-Frank act, a financial-reform...



via Business Feeds