Read your Lloyds flyer if you care about paperless billing


I may be in a minority, but I want my paper bank statement


An innocuous flyer is falling out of the monthly bank statements going to millions of current account holders at Lloyds. Read it. It tells you that statements will no longer be posted out monthly – instead, it will be every three months, unless you call a number to reinstate them.


One of the more bizarre stories we ran last year was of a woman who didn't realise – for two years – that her pay cheques were being wrongly credited to another person's account. One reason, she said, was that she had opted for paperless statements, she didn't check online, and did not know the money was going awry. Yes, she was castigated by the online community – but many people, myself included, aren't devoted to checking smartphones all the time, and prefer to scrutinise a monthly statement on paper.


I must, though, accept I'm in a minority – NatWest tells me only 15% of its customers elected to carry on receiving monthly statements when it carried out a similar exercise to Lloyds' in 2012.


The paperless revolution is happening across every consumer service. You can fight back with the "Keep Me Posted" campaign, although it's an irony that the campaign is largely online.






theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds




















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Karaliski: Creme Brulee



Advertising Agency: Milk, Vilnius, Lithuania

Executive Creative Director: Rimantas Stanevicius

Creative Director: Antonio Bechtle

Art Director: Adomas Jazdauskas

Copywriter: Vytaute Vilutyte

Copywriter: Asta Buteikyte

Photographer: Fotelier

Published: October 2013







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Shark cull: nationwide protests against 'catch and kill' policy in WA

Anger from coast to coast at state's controversial method, which aims to reduce the number of attacks























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Karaliski: Coffee



Advertising Agency: Milk, Vilnius, Lithuania

Executive Creative Director: Rimantas Stanevicius

Creative Director: Antonio Bechtle

Art Director: Adomas Jazdauskas

Copywriter: Vytaute Vilutyte

Copywriter: Asta Buteikyte

Photographer: Fotelier

Published: October 2013







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Zona Cyber Social Media Week: Olsen




Better watch what you're saying



Advertising Agency: Delantero, Fortaleza, Brazil

Creative Directors: Marcel Pinheiro, Pádua Sampaio, André Miyasaki

Art Directors: André Miyasaki, Matheus Sena, Sabrina Mesquita

Illustrator: Dimitri Bastos

Copywriters: Pádua Sampaio, Marcel Pinheiro, Eveline Farina

Retoucher: Saul Ferreira

Published: November 2013







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Zona Cyber Social Media Week: Metcalfe




Better watch what you're saying



Advertising Agency: Delantero, Fortaleza, Brazil

Creative Directors: Marcel Pinheiro, Pádua Sampaio, André Miyasaki

Art Directors: André Miyasaki, Matheus Sena, Sabrina Mesquita

Illustrator: Dimitri Bastos

Copywriters: Pádua Sampaio, Marcel Pinheiro, Eveline Farina

Retoucher: Saul Ferreira

Published: November 2013







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Zona Cyber Social Media Week: Gates




Better watch what you're saying



Advertising Agency: Delantero, Fortaleza, Brazil

Creative Directors: Marcel Pinheiro, Pádua Sampaio, André Miyasaki

Art Directors: André Miyasaki, Matheus Sena, Sabrina Mesquita

Illustrator: Dimitri Bastos

Copywriters: Pádua Sampaio, Marcel Pinheiro, Eveline Farina

Retoucher: Saul Ferreira

Published: November 2013







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Zona Cyber Social Media Week: Clark




Better watch what you're saying



Advertising Agency: Delantero, Fortaleza, Brazil

Creative Directors: Marcel Pinheiro, Pádua Sampaio, André Miyasaki

Art Directors: André Miyasaki, Matheus Sena, Sabrina Mesquita

Illustrator: Dimitri Bastos

Copywriters: Pádua Sampaio, Marcel Pinheiro, Eveline Farina

Retoucher: Saul Ferreira

Published: November 2013







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Dardanel: Before-After, Girl



Advertising Agency: Alaaddin Adworks, İstanbul, Turkey

Creative Director: Murat Doğu

Art Director / Retoucher: Ferdi Çağlayan

Copywriter: Moris Hasan

Published: July 2013







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Dardanel: Before-After, Guy



Advertising Agency: Alaaddin Adworks, İstanbul, Turkey

Creative Director: Murat Doğu

Art Director / Retoucher: Ferdi Çağlayan

Copywriter: Moris Hasan

Published: July 2013







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Bell's Whisky: The Reader



The new Bell's TV commercial features a father whose intrepid spirit demonstrates just what it takes to be a true Man of Character.


Advertising Agency: King James, Cape Town, South Africa

Directors: Greg Gray, Velocity Films

Production House TV Producer: Helena Woodfine

Executive Creative Director: Devin Kennedy

Creative Director: Mike Wilson

Art Director: Cameron Watson

Agency TV Producer: Caz Friedman

Client Service: Sheri Cook







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Toonies For Tummies: A toonie is all it takes to fill a hungry tummy



Grocery stores all across Ontario and Atlantic Canada will be asking shoppers to donate a toonie at checkout to provide breakfast for a hungry child in their community starting February 6th as part of their Toonies for Tummies program. To support Toonies for Tummies, creative agency Capital C has launched an integrated campaign to give people a compelling reason to donate and a way to track their donation. The campaign includes print, in-store, a microsite, social media and an online video.


Advertising Agency: Capital C, Canada







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AIAIAI: Fight The Silence




Fight The Silence



2 posters intended to hang next to each other. Part of instore campaign for danish headphone maker AIAIAI in their own flagship store and consumer electronic retail chain, Hi-Fi Klubben.


Creative Director: Peter Mix Willer

Art Director: Peter Mix Willer

Photographer: Casper Sejersen

Make-up Artist: Anne Staunsager

Retouch: Claus B. Troelsgaard

Typography: The Entente/Colophon Foundry

Additional credits: Martin Kjær Skou / Hi-Fi Klubben, Unique Models

Published: January 2014







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Pantene: Wooden Straight




Restore your hair



Advertising Agency: Grey, Lima, Peru

General Creative Director: Carles Puig

Art Director: Renato Carrión

Copywriter: Victor Conca

Photographer: Ángel Chávez

Post Production: Pixel Studio

Agency Production: Eliana Coquis, Lilian Aste

Production: Martha Plaza

Published: January 2014







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Pantene: Wooden Curls




Restore your hair



Advertising Agency: Grey, Lima, Peru

General Creative Director: Carles Puig

Art Director: Renato Carrión

Copywriter: Victor Conca

Photographer: Ángel Chávez

Post Production: Pixel Studio

Agency Production: Eliana Coquis, Lilian Aste

Production: Martha Plaza

Published: January 2014







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Oregon Lottery, All Things Oregon: Hazelnut



Advertising Agency: R/West, Portland, Oregon, USA

Creative Director: Elizabeth Morrow-McKenzie

Associate Creative Director: Taylor Siolka

Art Director: Ian Johnson

Copywriter: Taylor Siolka

Director: Sean Blixseth

Producer: Elliot Freeman

Director of Photography: Joe Meade

Published: January 2014







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Oregon Lottery, All Things Oregon: Beaver



The Oregon Lottery wanted to get Oregonians to play state funded games like Oregon's Game - Megabucks, rather than playing national games like Powerball. So how did we get our state's citizens to play local? Enter Eugene Buckland. Eugene is a lover of all things Oregon. In fact, he loves all things in Oregon so much he runs a local public-access television show called “All Things Oregon.” For as much as he loves our state animal, state rock, and state everything, it only makes sense that he would love Oregon’s Game as well. Eugene is just the right amount of quirky to represent our quirky state.


Advertising Agency: R/West, Portland, Oregon, USA

Creative Director: Elizabeth Morrow-McKenzie

Associate Creative Director: Taylor Siolka

Art Director: Ian Johnson

Copywriter: Taylor Siolka

Director: Sean Blixseth

Producer: Elliot Freeman

Director of Photography: Joe Meade

Published: January 2014







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Why a Picture Is Worth 1,000 Words: Using the Power of Visualization to Achieve Your Goals

Fresh off our New Year's celebrations, many of us chart a course for our personal and professional improvement. We reflect on where we have been and where we want to go. Change is a part of the beginning of a new year.



To make our plans "official," many of us write down our goals. In team meetings (and maybe even in family meetings), we make charts, tables and lists of what we want to accomplish in the year to come. This idea has been borne from previous research that has shown that writing down goals is a great way to maximize the possibility of their achievement.



However, we may want to add another element to our planning this year. Research suggests that adding a visual component to our goal-setting exercises may bring even stronger results.



In one 1996 study, a team of researchers from Michigan State University identified over 200 emergency room patients who had suffered from lacerations. Before being discharged, each of these individuals was handed instructions regarding how to care for their wounds at home. In an interesting twist, half of the patients received text-only instructions. The remaining individuals were provided the same text, along with visual depictions of what was required (i.e., cartoons that showed what was meant by the written descriptions).



The research team followed up with the patients three days later via telephone to see which individuals were more successful in terms of following their home-care plan. The results were fascinating.



People who were given the cartoons along with the text exhibited superior recall of the information than those in the text-only group. Specifically, while almost half (46 percent) of the people who received the cartoon-enhanced instructions were able to answer each of the wound-care questions correctly, only 6 percent in the text-only condition did so successfully. There were also 24 percent more people in the visual group who actually read the instructions.



Last but not least, individuals in the visually-enhanced group were 43 percent better in terms of their adherence to the instructions than the text-only crowd.



Implications

There are numerous takeaways from the above research. Although writing goals down is important, as it helps us focus our attention and determine a pathway for our efforts, adding a visual element certainly augments the chances of our success.



If you are leading a team (or family discussion) around goals this year, make sure you incorporate a visual element to the conversations. Within a work context, when discussing a new strategy or highlighting new expectations for customer engagement, think about how to create a visual representation of this new reality and include it with your text.



For example, taking the time to create a cartoon or other visual aid to demonstrate what these policies or behaviors look like in practice can help clarify the language and ensure everyone is on the same page.



You can also use posters to bring an element of fun or energy to the initiative. Several websites allow users to create their own motivational posters, uploading their own (or others') photos. This could be an individual -- or team-based activity -- that could maximize the benefits outlined in the research above.



Other organizations could also transmit new programs or policies through the utilization of skits or interactive role-plays. If there is a new customer experience or employee initiative taking place, these experiential opportunities can powerfully convey the why, how and what of the program, while making it easier for employees to recall.



Lastly, you could use a 'Vision Wall' to build your goals for 2014. For a team or organization, think about bringing everyone together and talk about what goals you have for yourselves in the coming year. Try to picture what these look like in real life. Identify different photos or illustrations that represent these ideas. Maybe some relate to client service standards. Perhaps others relate to financial goals for the team or how you want to work together as a unit. Regardless of the factors that constitute the 'vision wall,' go out and gather the corresponding images and post it in an area where everyone can be inspired. It is a great way to maximize alignment and engagement, while focusing on your priorities for the coming year.



Conclusion

While goal-setting is an important exercise, we may get distracted by focusing more on the analytical rather than the emotional part of the process. The above study demonstrates that bringing a visual component to goal-setting can significantly change our outcomes. So as you are writing down your goals for this year, make sure to include a visual to go along with it -- you could save yourself a thousand words and get even closer to achieving what you are setting out to accomplish.



Business Feed :


Conrad Black stripped of two honours by his native Canada

Former newspaper proprietor no longer an officer of the Order of Canada and removed from the privy council























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If You Were a Horrible Boss, Would You Even Know It?

"Is your boss a slave-driving psycho?" This is what a poster for the 2011 movie Horrible Bosses asks. As the movie's box-office popularity attests, most of us have worked for a horrible boss at some point.



In a brilliant piece on the subject, my friends at The Washingtonian review some especially hilarious, and horrifying, examples. One boss placed an electronic ticket machine outside his office, refusing to see his employees unless they took a number. Another forced employees that he believed said something "stupid" in meetings to stand on their chairs. My favorite was from a server at a crawfish restaurant: not only were the servers required to put bibs on their customers and wink at them, but the manager's definition of success in the job was to "have a stalker."



Luckily, smart organizations understand that horrible bosses are bad for business. One study of a Fortune 500 commercial bank found that, on average, poor leadership was associated with $1.2 million of operating losses, and that excellent leadership was associated with $4.5 million in operating profit. That's not chump change, people!



Most Horrible Bosses Don't Know They're Horrible



Here's where it gets disconcerting. A series of studies from the Center for Creative Leadership reports that half of managers are ineffective. That means there's a one in two chance that you're a horrible boss -- or at least an imperfect one.



Generally, I see two kinds of "leadership gone wrong." The first is what I call the "Cool Parent Leader," who focuses on people at the expense of results -- they're so interested in being liked and keeping everyone happy that nobody gets anything done. The second type is the "Trail of Dead Bodies Leader," who focuses on results at the expense of people. They might create short-term results, but it's only a matter of time before their team starts to burn out, hate them, or head for the hills at the first opportunity.



As a manger, do you see a piece of yourself in either of these archetypes? Or, to be more direct, if you were a horrible boss, would you know?



In the past 12 years, as a speaker, author and executive coach, I've been living out my personal quest to rid the world of horrible bosses. I've met few managers who get up in the morning and say, "Today, I am going to be the worst boss ever! I'm going to degrade my employees and upset everyone as much as possible."



So why are there so many bad bosses? They're bad because everyone is afraid to tell them. And generally, as you climb the corporate ladder, fewer and fewer people tell you the truth. This is terribly unfair when you think about it. What's a horrible boss to do?



Almost Anyone Can Become a Better Leader



In my new book, Bankable Leadership , I define leadership as "a series of learnable behaviors that help people and organizations realize their greatest potential." The most important word in that definition, I think, is "learnable." This isn't just my opinion. The science of leadership is clear: 70 percent of leadership is made.



In my experience, if they truly want to, 96 percent of the population can improve their leadership effectiveness (the remaining 4 percent are what we call sociopaths, whose brains are physically unable to develop real connections with others). But for the rest of us, there's no reason we can't improve.



The journey to become a better leader is an incremental one -- I can't give you a silver bullet, but I can give you three proven steps that will put you squarely on the right path.



1. Know Where You Stand



Just like you can't start a weight-loss program without getting on a scale, you must begin by learning the truth about how people see you. Use your resources and gather the facts, whether it's through an assessment (I have a free one available on http://ift.tt/KjgnV4) or feedback from people in your world who will tell you the truth.



2. Focus on One Thing at a Time



In businesses, research by Booz & Company shows that as the number of goals increases, revenue declines. Similarly, leaders often choose too many development goals ("This year, I'm going to learn how to give constructive feedback, build positive relationships, and improve my negotiation skills!"). Do yourself a favor -- have the discipline to focus on one developing one skill at a time. It is far better to make progress in one area than to make little or none in three.



3. Practice Every Day



Most leaders are guilty of what I call "delusional development." This is the futile hope that just by wanting to get better at something, it will magically happen. But as the saying goes, hope is not a plan. The amount of deliberate practice you choose will be proportionate to your improvement. So get up every day and make the world a practice field for your development. Some days might go better than others, but you will always learn.



So don't lose faith. Great leaders are made, not born, and real leaders improve incrementally. With a sense of openness and commitment, even the worst bosses can go from horrible to bankable.



Business Feed :


20 Banned Super Bowl Commercials That Never Aired During The Big Game (VIDEOS)

A Sneak Peek at Sunday's Super Bowl Ads

Superbowlroundup

Thanks to the Internet, enthusiastic football fans and sports novices alike can enjoy the Big Game's commercials long before kick off


While some brands are keeping their ads under wraps until Sunday, a whole slew of companies have uploaded ads, or at least teasers, to YouTube



So far, we've seen the heart-breaking (thanks, Budweiser), the funny (Audi, Chobani) and a whole bevy of celebrity appearances, including James Franco, Minka Kelly, Don Cheadle, Tom Hiddleston, Tim Tebow, John Stamos, Stephen Colbert, Ellen DeGeneres and Arnold Schwarzenegger — to name a few Read more...


More about Viral Videos, Ads, Brands, Super Bowl, and Super Bowl Ads





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How to Stick to Your Niche

When you launch your startup, you'll face many challenges and bumps in the road. Rather than allowing these to daunt you, welcome them. Each one will help you build a stronger sense of identity as a company and guide you closer to your niche within your industry.



Why is it so important to find your niche? Choosing to concentrate on a particular area rather than the entire breadth of the industry allows you to hone in on a target audience. This naturally eliminates competition and creates an opportunity for your business to build a reputation as an area expert.



Find Your Niche



At first, finding your niche within the gestalt of your industry may feel overwhelming. This is the stage to try on different hats to discover which suits you best. My company, Cutler Group, originated as a public relations firm that worked with a wide variety of clients; from food distributors to consulting firms, our focus was quite broad. It wasn't until we obtained our first tech-focused client that we realized how much we loved and were energized by the growing field. From then on, we became exclusively a tech PR agency and we haven't looked back since.



When you have identified an area of the industry that excites you, you are on your way to finding your niche -- but you aren't quite done yet. From here, identify a problem, recognize how your product or service can help, and focus all of your attention on that one area. That focus will guide the development of your company and your product.



Develop Your Niche and Stick to It



Once you have discovered your niche, stick to it in order to become a leader in your field. Maintain the quality and integrity of your product at all times to ensure your clients have a reason to stay with your company.



If your startup is to become the "go to" name in the business, you will also need to become in expert on your field. Be constantly aware of changing trends and industry news. There is always something new to learn. Be voracious for information.



While finding a niche is very important, it is crucial to avoid closing your company off to too many potential opportunities. My company works with clients across various tech sectors rather than just focusing on one or two. In this way, we focus on the technology industry without limiting ourselves to a narrow pool.



Find Your Voice and Market Carefully



It is also important to build a voice and a presence for your company within your field. Attend industry-specific events, meetups and conferences. Seek out speaking opportunities rather than waiting for them to come to you. Sponsorship is also a very effective way to increase your visibility. There are many paths to take when it comes to building awareness of your brand, so do not be hesitant to show the world who you are in as many ways as possible!



Blogging, writing a column for an industry newsletter, and publishing work targeted at the groups that will use your product are also great tools to build business. They are another way to establish you as a thought leader and create a sense of recognition.



While all of these avenues will create opportunities for your startup, you should also remember that word of mouth within a niche industry is everything. Communities are tight-knit, so producing the best possible results for each of your clients will earn you a reliable reputation and will increase demand for your product.



What do you think? How have your embarked on the journey to finding your niche in your industry, and how have you maintained it?



Zach Cutler is an entrepreneur and is founder and CEO of Cutler Group, a tech PR agency headquartered in New York City. A member of the Young Entrepreneur Council, Zach specializes in crafting innovative PR campaigns to help innovative tech companies and startups thrive.



Business Feed :


Choose to Find Her and Mentor Her

Recently I was talking to a new friend, Leslie,* who has a very prominent career in science, about sponsorship.



In particular, I was talking about the need for women to sponsor younger women in their careers by championing them for internships, jobs, promotions, and fellowships with introductions and more.



She and many top STEM women I have spoken with in the last six weeks shared that in their careers, they had a supportive male sponsor or two whotook them under their wing and helped advance their professional careers. They often felt lonely and were often the only woman, or just one of a few.



Leslie mentioned that the top woman in her department asked her when she was transitioning to bigger and better. "Why didn't you come to me ever? Why didn't you ask for my help?"



Leslie was really surprised.



Was Leslie uncomfortable, too proud to request the help and mentoring of a more seasoned colleague? Or was the mentor unapproachable, busy, intimidating? Regardless, Leslie did well and did get support and sponsorship.



This conversation has been gnawing at me for the last 48 hours as we embark on mobilizing 1 million mentors (men and women) to support girls and young women in their STEM careers.



January is national mentoring month, so I want to challenge you to reflect for a minute and visualize:




  • A young woman who has reached out to you in the last three to six months for help.





  • Perhaps someone you met visiting a school, or who sent you a follow-up email that grabbed your attention.





  • A friend who asked you to meet with her daughter, sister or niece for career advice.





  • Maybe a young woman who left a B-level impression on you but was passed up for that internship or job at your company for a common error that you see in recent employee candidates.





  • A young woman at the gym, church, synagogue, or mosque who asked you about your career or how you balance it all.






And then take her out to coffee next week!



I mean it. Do it in honor of National Mentoring Month. She deserves a full hour of your time, and you will likely get just as much out of it.



"I would like to invite you to meet for a cup of coffee or tea."



You might have just found your mentee or the young woman you will sponsor in 2014.



Did you know that men are reportedly 42-percent more likely to have a sponsor?



And if you are willing to mentor that girl, young woman or another for a minimum of 20 hours, with skills in STEM fields, you are welcome to be one of the million and let your commitment count officially as part of the Million Women Mentors initiative. Together, let's move the needle on girls having fulfilling and well-paying careers.



P.S. If you need some leads for yourself or your company, we have 44 partners on the site with links to their STEM efforts, and they serve well over 18 million girls.



*Not her real name.



Business Feed :


Promoting Your Value in a New Era

While some companies still collect them, resumes rarely indicate which candidates have the most potential. Today more than ever, companies are looking for employees with qualities that don't typically show up on paper. How well do you communicate? Can you truly connect with others? Do you have the potential to be an influential leader? Companies want to know how you respond in the real world, working with the people around you. Those who have the social fluency to succeed in face-to-face settings and who use rich stories to promote their brand emerge as the rising stars.



Beyond simply getting along with others, we all have to "sell" our value and our ideas to get ahead. While most of my clients have reached some level of success, many struggle to communicate their value propositions during personal interactions -- interviews, networking events or high-stakes meetings. My advice usually involves finding ways to make their individual strengths come alive. People need to know about your skills, but they are more interested in how and why you bring those skills to the table. If you can weave that information into a relevant story that is anchored by your unique capabilities, you can make a positive, lasting impression (without sounding boastful or awkward).



If you doubt the importance of selling your value beyond the resume, just look at the way many Fortune 500 companies are now evaluating employees to determine their readiness for next-level leadership. At Deloitte, for instance, candidates for partner or director participate in a review that involves making a value proposition presentation -- complete with PowerPoint decks and compelling graphics. The people selected to advance can clearly communicate their energy and passion, as well as the value they have to offer the company. They are the ones who present their performance metrics layered with meaning, their industry knowledge, and examples of their impact at the local and national level. I have worked with clients to prepare for these presentations, and one thing's for sure: the message they are sharing is light-years ahead of the one-dimensional resume. Success -- especially at higher levels -- is determined by how you say things, not just what you say.



Even if you're not competing for a senior position, you can use this idea to communicate your value more effectively and accelerate your own career. It's a new era for self-promotion, and it's time to think outside of the resume box!



I'd love to hear your thoughts.



Business Feed :


The Case of Bixi Bikes: A Learning Opportunity for Social Enterprise

Living in and around New York City, it has been hard to miss the explosion of blue bicycles that have found themselves throughout the city streets. Last month, in warmer weather, I enjoyed one as I went from meeting to meeting in Manhattan. Those bikes were supplied by a Montreal-based company, called Bixi, which has provided over 37,000 bicycles and payment technology platforms for bike-sharing programs around the world. Sounds like a potentially great idea and operation, yes? This month Bixi filed for bankruptcy protection.



What happened? According to Co.Exist, an online magazine, bike programs like Bixi have proven to be too "expensive to build, operate and maintain," and the Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal reported in November that Bixi (also known as Public Bike System Co.) is experiencing "financial challenges, disputes with its software subcontractor and plans to restructure." Bixi is in a legal dispute with Nice Ride Minnesota, a popular bike-sharing program, which states that the company is in "material breach" of its current contract.



Bixi started with much fanfare as the City of Montreal helped start, invested in and supplied initial contracts to the nonprofit. The social enterprise was able to distinguish "itself from earlier bicycle-sharing systems by using solar power and docking stations that relied on wireless networks for communications," according to The New York Times . Bixi systems have been installed in a number of other cities, including Washington, Boston, Chicago and San Francisco, but now the troubled effort is reporting over $45 million in debt and may be on its way out.



While the road may be rocky for Bixi, there are signs of promise in other smaller efforts. This month in Kansas City, BikeWalkKC, a nonprofit that runs a bike-share program, launched to build new bike stations throughout the city. Kansas City had the unfortunate distinction six years ago of being ranked dead last for two-wheeled commuting by the U.S. Census Bureau. The effort is currently working to secure funding and is using crowdfunding as part of its fundraising solution. According to a MIT researcher, the BikeWalkKC effort has become the largest civic crowdfunding effort ever attempted.



As we think about the growing social entrepreneurship movement, we have begun to see the start of some failures, which, according to Ruth McCambridge at the Nonprofit Quarterly, could be a good for the movement. He stated, "We tend to believe that as we move further into social enterprise, we will all find out, through failures even more than successes, what works and what does not." As it relates to Kansas City as they look at Bixi, I am sure they are taking note to both this financing approach and how their approach might be better served as we look to the future of this type of initiative.



Business Feed :


Microsoft Ad Sales Exec Keith Lorizio Is Out



Microsoft may be close to naming a new CEO, but now it will also need to a new ad sales exec.


Keith Lorizio, VP-U.S. sales for Microsoft's advertising division, is no longer with the company. A Microsoft spokesperson confirmed the news, which Adweek had reported earlier on Friday.


"We can confirm that Keith Lorizio, VP of US Sales for Microsoft Advertising, is no longer with the company. Barry Dougan, General Manager of Global Specialist Sales, will assume interim leadership of the US ad sales organization while we conduct a rigorous and thoughtful search for a permanent replacement. This search will include internal as well as external candidates," the spokesperson said in a statement.


Continue reading at AdAge.com






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10 Must-See 2014 Super Bowl Ads To Watch Out For (VIDEOS)