Defrauded online but I ended up with a black mark on my Experian credit check

Nationwide asked me to cut up my card ... then I discovered I couldn’t open an Isa account

Last March someone tried to use my credit card details to obtain £780-worth of goods online. Nationwide was quick to identify an unusual transaction and contacted me straight away. I was instructed to cut up my card which I did immediately. Since then they have not sent a replacement as they promised, nor did they send me any correspondence. In September, I tried to open an Isa account with HSBC, but a credit check revealed I had a delinquent account and I was refused. I had to open an account with Experian to discover that, six months on, Nationwide still hadn’t resolved the fraud issue and my account showed a £780 debt plus interest. After weeks of chasing, I have received a statement showing that this sum has been cancelled but Nationwide has not notified Experian to remove the black mark. Meanwhile, I am out of pocket having lost the interest and related benefits from the Isa and I paid to sign up to Experian. KS, North Ferriby, Yorkshire


After emailing me you discover that, in a botched attempt to sort the problem, Nationwide has opened a second account in your name with Experian which shows a healthy credit rating, but that’s small comfort since the old delinquent account remains. No one can explain how this came to be and they tell you that they have 56 days under their terms and conditions to get to the bottom of the mystery.


Continue reading...



via Business Feeds

3 Svelte Aids to Get Your Smartphone Through the Day

There's no need to choose between a dead smartphone and lugging around a brick to charge it. A number of thin, credit-card sized devices can now top off a smartphone from their own internal batteries, a laptop, or even the wall.

















RSS: Business Feeds

My Super Bowl Victory in Weight Loss

2015-02-01-DonandPetePerlman.jpg



Peter Perlman, one of the nations' most acclaimed trial attorneys, and Don McNay



You know we're just strutting' for fun

Strutting' our stuff for everyone.

We're not here to start no trouble.

We're just here to do the Super Bowl Shuffle.




-the 1985 Chicago Bears



Super Bowl Sunday marks an important anniversary for me. Exactly 2 months ago today, Dr Derek Weiss of Bluegrass Bariatric in Lexington performed gastric sleeve weight loss surgery on me at Georgetown Community Hospital.



This is part of my business plan upcoming book (released in August) called Project 199, My Business Plan to Lose 175 Pounds and the plan is working .



I started my recovery, which included walking around the hospital a few hours after surgery, almost immediately and was discharged the next day. I had no serious complications and after a few weeks off of work, I've come back better than ever.



Some reasons to celebrate the weight loss Super Bowl.



Concerning health issues:



-My weight has dropped from 377 to 311 pounds. A loss of 66 pounds.



-I was diabetic before I started the surgery. I have not been since the day after the surgery. I threw away the two blood sugar medicines that I was taking for diabetes the day after the surgery and my blood sugar stays in a normal range and never varies. That saves me over $400 a month in medications along.



-My blood pressure is steadily dropping.



-My ankles and feet don't swell. My shoe size is about a ½ of a size smaller.



-I have more energy and personal happiness than ever.



At 377 pounds, I weighed more than William "The Refrigerator" Perry. Now I don't and never will again



2015-02-01-TheFridge.jpg



The Fridge in 1985





Lifestyle issues:



-I've lost 10 inches around my waist and 4 around my neck collar.



-I can sit in a normal, coach, airline seat (I couldn't before.)



-I can sit in a normal coach airline seat without a seat belt extender. (I couldn't get near)



-I can crawl on the floor with my grandchildren. As I get in the next two months, I hope to able to crawl on the floor but could not do it at all. I had to be pulled off the floor previously.



-I went to two NBA basketball games and could sit in normal seats. I've had times in recent years where I did not fit into seats in sports arenas.



-I won't be gaining thousands of calories at this Super Bowl, as I have in the past. I can have normal food but my stomach only holds a tiny amount of it. My focus will be on low carb, high protein snacks, like meat and chip. No chips and no soft drinks.



- I will probably never have another soft drink. Since I was knocking out six diet cokes a day or more, this is a huge step.



-I have not been to a fast food restaurant since the surgery. I also have not had any bread. They allow me to have some bread but I am not interested in the carbs.



2015-02-01-DonandJusticeDebraLambert.jpg



Kentucky Court of Appeals Justice Debra Lambert and Don McNay





New Habits I picked up:



1. I have written down every morsel of food that I eaten (or drank on an I Phone app named Lose It. Everyone seems to have their favorite app, or something like Fit Bit. I happened to get this one first, it does what I want to and I have no desire to change.



2. Immediately upon waking up, I weigh myself, take my blood sugar, body temperature, blood pressure (not every day) and how much sleep I had the night before. '



3. Lately I have added my steps for the day, which Lose It also tracks. I focus on getting 2 miles of walking in each day. This is 1.9999 longer than I was two months ago.



To quote Jimmy Buffett, "if it suddenly ended tomorrow, I could somehow adjust to the fall." I am a lot healthier and everyone around me tells me I am much happier. My blood sugar fueled mood swings have gone away. I'm pretty laid back for the first time in my life.



On the other hand, I am not even at the half way point. My business plan calls for me to lose 175 pounds and that is what I am going to do.



By next year's Super Bowl.



They say it is hard to repeat as Super Bowl champion but in the weight loss Super Bowl, I plan to rack up two in a row. Then a lifetime after that.



Don McNay CLU CHFS, MSFS, CSSC is a bestselling author, former syndicated column, lottery guru and author of the upcoming book, Project 199: My Business Plan to Lose175 Pounds. He lives in Lexington KY and weighed 377 pounds on August 28 of last year.



McNay is beginning a series of talks and lectures about his process. The lecture which will be free to groups who fight obesity or addiction. If you want more information, contact him at http://ift.tt/1xyRg3L or email him at don@donmcnay.com






2015-02-01-DonandPierceonPierceBD.jpg



Pierce Hamblin, One of the nations's best mediators and trial attorney, with Don McNay and a copy of Ric Flair's autobiography.



Business Feed :


Adweek's Instant Reviews of the 2015 Super Bowl Ads

Tim Nudd - February 01, 2015 at 10:06AM

It's that time again. Time to gorge on football and pricey commercials, not necessarily in that order.


We already know a lot about what to expect from the ads of Super Bowl XLIX. Comedy, tragedy, celebrities, puppies, big spectacles and a few quiet moments. But hopefully something we haven't seen yet will blow us away.


On Sunday night, Adweek will bring you real-time reviews of every single commercial immediately after it airs. Last year, we did letter grades. This year we're making it even simpler—thumbs up or thumbs down.


Follow us on Twitter at @Adweek and @AdFreak to see the instant reviews there first. Then, as the game progresses, you'll be able to see every commercial again—and Adweek's reviews of them all—at the links below. We'll be updating the galleries in real time, too, keeping up with the pace of the ads.


• FIRST QUARTER (link will go live after the quarter begins)

• SECOND QUARTER (link will go live after the quarter begins)

• THIRD QUARTER (link will go live after the quarter begins)

• FOURTH QUARTER (link will go live after the quarter begins)


Thanks for joining us. Enjoy the night!






via Business Feeds

China manufacturing shrinks for the first time in two years, survey shows

China’s official measure of activity in factory and workshops shows it contracted in January, signalling continued slowing of the economy


China grows at slowest rate for 24 years


China’s manufacturing activity contracted for the first time in more than two years in January, an official survey showed on Sunday, signalling further downward pressure on the world’s second-largest economy.


The official purchasing managers’ index (PMI) released by the national bureau of statistics came in at 49.8 last month, down from the 50.1 recorded in December.


Related: Hard times return as China bids to bring its economic miracle to an end


Continue reading...



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RIP Bonne Bell: Lip Smacker manufacturer set to close

Lip-smacker-1

It's the end of an era.


Bonne Belle, the cosmetics company behind the iconic Lip Smacker flavored lip gloss, is slated to close its factory and lay off the vast majority of its employees.



Mawkins International, a California-based cosmetics company, which owns brands like Wet N Wild and Physicians Formula, is acquiring Bonne Bell and Lip Smacker, the two companies announced.


As a result, Bonne Bell will soon be "permanently laying off" most of its employees and closing down its factory, according to a report on Cleveland.com. Read more...


More about Nostalgia, Business, and Us





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Taking Your Startup Public Is Fraught With Negatives

In the old days, every entrepreneur dreamed of easily taking their startup public, and making it big. Today the rate of startups going public (IPO - Initial Public Offering) is up from the dead zone, but is still less than half the rate of 15 years ago. Smart entrepreneurs now avoid this option like the plague, due to its unpredictability and the challenges of running a public company.






According to a recent Ernst & Young global report, 2014 was a strong year with IPOs actually outperforming other indices by 10 percent. Yet they see warning lights flashing, based on a still fragile global economy, and volatile markets ahead. Today 70 percent of successful startups are still acquired by bigger companies, as the safer and preferred method of growth and funding.






The reasons are a lot more complex than the meltdown of key investment banks in the US a few years ago, so don't expect a big change in the numbers soon, even with recent stock market rallies. In my view, the key reasons that IPOs have lost their luster from an entrepreneur and investor perspective include the following:







  1. The US IPO process is still stumbling. Too many startups have experienced early financial losses and technical glitches, like King Digital Entertainment and the Facebook IPO a while back, which antagonized individual investors and startup executives as well. In addition, most ordinary investors are convinced that IPO rewards only go to insiders.



  2. Going public is an expensive process. Typical costs for startups today range from $250,000 to $1 million, even if the offering does not go through. In addition, huge amounts of executive time are required, as well as hits to key operational, accounting, and communication processes. The M&A alternative looks simple by comparison.



  3. Constant pressure to increase earnings. Because public shareholders usually take the short-term view, they want to see constant rises in the stock's price so they can sell their shares for a profit. Thus, there is tremendous pressure to increase current earnings, and little appetite for strategic investments.



  4. Startups going public are laid open to competitors and critics. Startups are typically run by a couple of executives who are reluctant to disclose via the prospectus and SEC reports all the decision-making criteria, operational financial details, and compensation formulas. With thousands of shareholders, dealing with critics is an onerous challenge.



  5. Complying with Sarbanes-Oxley requirements is a heavy burden. Public companies of any size must comply immediately with the full reporting requirements of the SEC. There is no accommodation for smaller public companies, who can't be competitive in their space with the new accounting, documenting, and reporting processes required.



  6. Public companies are always at risk for takeovers. Friendly or hostile takeover attempts are just a couple of the many ways that company founders sense a loss of control of their own destiny. The board of directors, as well as public stockholders, are no longer part of the inside team focused on the founder's vision to change the world.



  7. Increased liability risk exposure. Public company executives and directors are at civil and even criminal risk for false or misleading statements in the registration statement. In addition, officers may face liability for misrepresentations in public communications and SEC reports. Executives are also at risk for insider trading and employment practices.



  8. Violent market swings usually hit public companies first. Private companies in less-relevant market segments can often fly under the radar in turbulent times like the recent recession. Public stockholders are more easily swayed by emotion and the activities of the crowd, than real market conditions.



  9. Startup founders don't fit in a public company. Most just don't enjoy all the challenges of communicating to analysts, placating demanding stockholders, and keeping up with legal reporting requirement. They know they can be quickly tossed aside for not maintaining the right image and the right relationships with people they don't like.



  10. The image of large public companies is negative. In the last couple of decades, the paternal image of large multi-national company leaders like Thomas Watson at IBM and Henry Ford is gone. Now the mistakes of large companies like Enron and BP have set a new image of public companies as being led by greedy and uncaring executives.






These negatives have largely overshadowed the potential IPO positives of increased capital for the startup, possible huge increase in personal net worth, broader access to investors, market for their stock, the ability to attract top-notch professionals, and the peer prestige of running a public company.






Thus most startups I know don't even mention the IPO exit option, when applying for Angel funding, and most Angel investors will react negatively if you do mention it. As best, you should reserve this option for later stage VC discussions, once you have a well-proven business model, large market following, and substantial revenue.






More importantly, make sure first that you really want to give up the entrepreneur lifestyle for the challenges of a public company executive. I'm betting that Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook fame still has second thoughts from time to time, despite being worth $33 billion as a result.






Business Feed :


FirstBank: Charlie is an actor

















Advertising Agency: TDA_Boulder, Boulder, USA

Creative Director / Copywriter: Jeremy Seibold

Art Director: Haley Garyet

Executive Creative Directors: Jonathan Schoenberg, Thomas Dooley

Account Director: Danielle Borden

Account Sup.: Charlie Wright

Agency Producer: Susan Fisher

Production Company: Furlined

Directors: Speck and Gordon

D.P.: Jo Willems

Executive Producer: David Thorne

Line Producer: Aris McGarry

Talent: Charlie Greenleaf

Editorial/Post: Stitch

Editor: Andy McGraw

Producer: Rebecca Baker

Telecine: The Mill

Colorist: Adam Scott

Mix/Sound Design: Lime Studios

Engineer: Dave Wagg

Animation: Bernard Tan

Music: JSM Music

Creative Director / Producer: Joel Simon

Executive Producer: Ross Hopman

Composers: Doug Katsaros, Nathan Kil, Joel Simon

Published: February 2015







via Business Feeds

FirstBank: Puppies for sale

















Advertising Agency: TDA_Boulder, Boulder, USA

Creative Director / Copywriter: Jeremy Seibold

Art Director: Haley Garyet

Executive Creative Directors: Jonathan Schoenberg, Thomas Dooley

Account Director: Danielle Borden

Account Sup.: Charlie Wright

Agency Producer: Susan Fisher

Production Company: Furlined

Directors: Speck and Gordon

D.P.: Jo Willems

Executive Producer: David Thorne

Line Producer: Aris McGarry

Talent: Charlie Greenleaf

Editorial/Post: Stitch

Editor: Andy McGraw

Producer: Rebecca Baker

Telecine: The Mill

Colorist: Adam Scott

Mix/Sound Design: Lime Studios

Engineer: Dave Wagg

Animation: Bernard Tan

Music: JSM Music

Creative Director / Producer: Joel Simon

Executive Producer: Ross Hopman

Composers: Doug Katsaros, Nathan Kil, Joel Simon

Published: February 2015







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Vespa Ecuador: Solution, 3



Advertising Agency: RGB, Quito, Ecuador

Creative Director / Copywriter: Xavier Montag

Art Director: Santiago Ontaneda







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Vespa Ecuador: Solution, 2



Advertising Agency: RGB, Quito, Ecuador

Creative Director / Copywriter: Xavier Montag

Art Director: Santiago Ontaneda







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Vespa Ecuador: Solution, 1



Advertising Agency: RGB, Quito, Ecuador

Creative Director / Copywriter: Xavier Montag

Art Director: Santiago Ontaneda







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Old Spice: Courage

















Advertising Agency: Circus Grey, Peru

Chief Creative Officer: Juan Carlos Gómez de la Torre

Associate Chief Creative Officer: Emiliano González De Pietri

Interactive Creative Director: Ricardo Llavador

Copywriter: Nicolás Soto

Art Director: Francisco Valenzuela

Agency Producers: Vanessa Díaz, Melissa Perales

Account Director: Gisella Paul

Account Executive: Claudia Bellido

Production Company: No Problem Films

Director: Jesús Plaza

Executive Producer: Pimi Ravizza

Post Production: Tosta

Sound: Megáfono

Music: Franjo Antich







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Old Spice: Confidence

















Advertising Agency: Circus Grey, Peru

Chief Creative Officer: Juan Carlos Gómez de la Torre

Associate Chief Creative Officer: Emiliano González De Pietri

Interactive Creative Director: Ricardo Llavador

Copywriter: Nicolás Soto

Art Director: Francisco Valenzuela

Agency Producers: Vanessa Díaz, Melissa Perales

Account Director: Gisella Paul

Account Executive: Claudia Bellido

Production Company: No Problem Films

Director: Jesús Plaza

Executive Producer: Pimi Ravizza

Post Production: Tosta

Sound: Megáfono

Music: Franjo Antich







via Business Feeds

Old Spice: Audacity

















Advertising Agency: Circus Grey, Peru

Chief Creative Officer: Juan Carlos Gómez de la Torre

Associate Chief Creative Officer: Emiliano González De Pietri

Interactive Creative Director: Ricardo Llavador

Copywriter: Nicolás Soto

Art Director: Francisco Valenzuela

Agency Producers: Vanessa Díaz, Melissa Perales

Account Director: Gisella Paul

Account Executive: Claudia Bellido

Production Company: No Problem Films

Director: Jesús Plaza

Executive Producer: Pimi Ravizza

Post Production: Tosta

Sound: Megáfono

Music: Franjo Antich







via Business Feeds

Old Spice: Strength

















Advertising Agency: Circus Grey, Peru

Chief Creative Officer: Juan Carlos Gómez de la Torre

Associate Chief Creative Officer: Emiliano González De Pietri

Interactive Creative Director: Ricardo Llavador

Copywriter: Nicolás Soto

Art Director: Francisco Valenzuela

Agency Producers: Vanessa Díaz, Melissa Perales

Account Director: Gisella Paul

Account Executive: Claudia Bellido

Production Company: No Problem Films

Director: Jesús Plaza

Executive Producer: Pimi Ravizza

Post Production: Tosta

Sound: Megáfono

Music: Franjo Antich







via Business Feeds

Old Spice: Leadership

















Advertising Agency: Circus Grey, Peru

Chief Creative Officer: Juan Carlos Gómez de la Torre

Associate Chief Creative Officer: Emiliano González De Pietri

Interactive Creative Director: Ricardo Llavador

Copywriter: Nicolás Soto

Art Director: Francisco Valenzuela

Agency Producers: Vanessa Díaz, Melissa Perales

Account Director: Gisella Paul

Account Executive: Claudia Bellido

Production Company: No Problem Films

Director: Jesús Plaza

Executive Producer: Pimi Ravizza

Post Production: Tosta

Sound: Megáfono

Music: Franjo Antich







via Business Feeds

Old Spice: Chivalry

















Advertising Agency: Circus Grey, Peru

Chief Creative Officer: Juan Carlos Gómez de la Torre

Associate Chief Creative Officer: Emiliano González De Pietri

Interactive Creative Director: Ricardo Llavador

Copywriter: Nicolás Soto

Art Director: Francisco Valenzuela

Agency Producers: Vanessa Díaz, Melissa Perales

Account Director: Gisella Paul

Account Executive: Claudia Bellido

Production Company: No Problem Films

Director: Jesús Plaza

Executive Producer: Pimi Ravizza

Post Production: Tosta

Sound: Megáfono

Music: Franjo Antich







via Business Feeds

City of Edmonton: The Fit Finder

















Advertising Agency: RED the Agency, Edmonton, Canada

Creative Director: Dennis Lenarduzzi

Art Director: Christy Yaseyko

Copywriter: Katie Rolheiser

Account / Project Manager: Angus Gastle, Joshua Zarobiak

Video: Kelly Wolfert / Leven Creative

Published: January 2015







via Business Feeds

Is the failure of health regulation damaging our well-being? | Aseem Malhotra

Doctors are advised on pharmaceuticals by Nice, but this advice is often based on studies funded by the companies selling the drugs

Crises affecting the NHS are in the news every week. Staff shortages and bed-blocking; increasing demand from patients with chronic conditions; the worst A&E waiting times for a decade. This is despite the government investing £700m in emergency care over the past few months.


But perhaps it’s not all about money or, rather, it’s about spending whatever money we have wisely. For once in healthcare, there is a lesson to be learned from the US, where it is estimated that a third of all healthcare brings no benefit to patients.


Continue reading...



via Business Feeds

Alexis Tsipiros, new Greek PM, tamps down rhetoric on bailout

Alexis Tsipras

A day after Greece appeared on a collision course with its creditors, new radical left Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has tamped down the rhetoric by vowing to pay off debts and not act unilaterally.






via Business Feeds

10 Worst States To Grow Old In

This story was originally published on 24/7 Wall St.



The U.S. elderly population has grown exponentially in recent decades. The number of Americans 65 and older grew from 35 million in 2000 to 41.4 million in 2011 and to an estimated 44.7 million in 2013. This trend is expected to continue as members of the baby boomer generation reach retirement age.



While it can be difficult to grow old in some U.S. states, life for seniors is often far worse in many other countries. Still, the United States will face increasingly large challenges. In the coming years, state officials, families, and individuals will need to pay more attention to the needs of the elderly — to improve medical care, access to services, infrastructure, or other amenities that become more necessary late in life.



Click here to see the worst states to grow old in



HelpAge International evaluates each year the social and economic well-being of elderly country residents in its Global AgeWatch Index. Last year, the United States was among the better places to grow old in the world, at eighth place. However, domestically, each state offers a very different quality of life for its older residents. Based on an independent analysis by 24/7 Wall St., which incorporated a range of income, health, labor, and environmental indicators, Utah is the best state in which to grow old, while Mississippi is the worst.



To be considered among the worst states to grow old, senior citizens in the states had to have relatively weak income security, as measured by several indicators. The 2013 median income among families with a head of household 65 and older, for example, did not exceed the comparable national figure of $37,847 in nine of the worst states to grow old. A typical elderly household in Mississippi earned less than $30,000, the least nationwide.



Retirees often have fixed income as they begin to tap into their savings and collect social security. Kate Bunting, CEO of AgeWatch USA, explained that, “It’s really important for older people to have reliable access to a guaranteed income.” More than 90% of Americans 65 and older in the vast majority of states received social security income in 2013. Yet, the average monthly social security benefit of $1,294 was likely not enough for many seniors.



Many older Americans also had non-social security income, such as withdrawals from 401Ks and savings as a supplement. In 2013, 47.9% of Americans 65 and older had such supplemental retirement incomes. Comparable figures in a majority of the worst states to grow old actually exceeded the national figure. Even with the supplemental retirement income many elderly residents had, it was frequently not enough to offset their financial burdens. At stake, according to Bunting, is the elderly’s “ability to eat nutritious foods, which impacts their health, and their ability to access other critical services.”



Click here to see the best states to grow old in



With lower, and often fixed, incomes, elderly Americans are vulnerable financially. In addition, age often brings a host of health problems, causing greater reliance on medical and accessibility services. To determine how the states fared when it comes to health care, we examined health services and outcomes. Among the worst states, for example, life expectancy was relatively low. In all of the 10 worst states, it was less than 80 years. Life expectancy at birth in 2011 did not exceed 76 years in four of the states.



A good education, which can lead to employment opportunities and higher incomes, is also an indication of well-being. More than 24% of Americans 65 and older had at least a bachelor’s degree as of 2013. In seven of the 10 worst states to grow old, however, less than 20% of elderly residents had attained at least a bachelor’s degree. In Mississippi, just 14.2% did, the lowest rate nationwide.



Safety often becomes a greater concern for aging Americans, as older people are often targeted by criminals. Residents of any age in the worst states to grow old also did not feel particularly safe. On a recent survey, less than 70% of residents in nine of the 10 states told Gallup they felt safe walking home alone at night. The violent crime rate in four of the worst states was also greater than 500 violent crimes reported per 100,000 residents, all among the higher violent crime rates in the nation.



In addition, policies often shape the quality of life of a state’s elderly population, particularly in terms of accessibility to services. Based on an OECD survey, all of the worst states for old people had worse accessibility to services than the majority of states. Bunting said that the aging population is growing, and it will become increasingly “important that [states] have the right kinds of policies in place that help support a quality old age.” Adapting to these demographic patterns through age-friendly policy, Bunting continued, is “important and worthwhile to do, no matter what age you are.”



These are the worst states to grow old in.



Business Feed :


Adalskodun: The cliff

















Advertising Agency: Quiver, Iceland







via Business Feeds

The Boston Globe: Bulletin board




Where Seattle comes for their bulletin board material.

Everything you need to know about Super Bowl Sunday. All week long.



Advertising Agency: Sleek Machine, Boston, USA

Creative Director: Tim Cawley

Art Director: Alan Duda

Copywriter: Jeff Morois

Photographers: Jim Davis, Matthew J. Lee

Published: January 2015







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The Boston Globe: Nachos




Sound smart at your Super Bowl party. Even with a mouthful of nachos.

Everything you need to know about Super Bowl Sunday. All week long.



Advertising Agency: Sleek Machine, Boston, USA

Creative Director: Tim Cawley

Art Director: Alan Duda

Copywriter: Jeff Morois

Photographers: Jim Davis, Matthew J. Lee

Published: January 2015







via Business Feeds

The Boston Globe: Monday




Hopefully on Monday, you’ll be buying an extra copy to frame.

Everything you need to know about Super Bowl Sunday. All week long.



Advertising Agency: Sleek Machine, Boston, USA

Creative Director: Tim Cawley

Art Director: Alan Duda

Copywriter: Jeff Morois

Photographers: Jim Davis, Matthew J. Lee

Published: January 2015







via Business Feeds

A cry for help from the health service

Chris Riddell on Ed Miliband’s pledge to ‘weaponise’ the NHS


Continue reading...



via Business Feeds

The Richest County In Each State

In his recent State of the Union address, president Barack Obama asked, “will we accept an economy where only a few of us do spectacularly well? Or will we commit ourselves to an economy that generates rising incomes and chances for everyone who makes the effort?”



Business Feed :


One Show: ROI

















Advertising Agency: The Martin Agency / Design Army

Animation: Hue&Cry

Sound and Music: Antfood







via Business Feeds

Fisher-Price: Poem to your child

















Advertising Agency: Trojan One, Canada







via Business Feeds

May Fair Kitchen: Fish



Advertising Agency: Saatchi Masius, London, UK

Creative Director: Surrey Garland

Art Director: Mel Harvey

Copywriter: Richard Warren

Photographer: Chelsea Bloxsome

Published: November 2014







via Business Feeds

May Fair Kitchen: Tomato



Advertising Agency: Saatchi Masius, London, UK

Creative Director: Surrey Garland

Art Director: Mel Harvey

Copywriter: Richard Warren

Photographer: Chelsea Bloxsome

Published: November 2014







via Business Feeds

May Fair Kitchen: Steak



Advertising Agency: Saatchi Masius, London, UK

Creative Director: Surrey Garland

Art Director: Mel Harvey

Copywriter: Richard Warren

Photographer: Chelsea Bloxsome

Published: November 2014







via Business Feeds

Sta-Bil Storage: Hog




Be sure your hog isn't a bore next spring.



Advertising Agency: MARC USA, Chicago, USA

Executive Creative Director: Joe Burke

Creative Director: Stephanie Franke

Associate Creative Director / Copywriter: Jeff Norman

Associate Creative Director / Art Director: Chad Hangen

Photographer: Zack Burris

Retoucher: Bill Sheffler

Published: September 2014







via Business Feeds

Sta-Bil Storage: Horse




Be sure the ol’ girl doesn’t come up lame next spring.



Advertising Agency: MARC USA, Chicago, USA

Executive Creative Director: Joe Burke

Creative Director: Stephanie Franke

Associate Creative Director / Copywriter: Jeff Norman

Associate Creative Director / Art Director: Chad Hangen

Photographer: Zack Burris

Retoucher: Bill Sheffler

Published: September 2014







via Business Feeds

Sta-Bil Storage: Goat




Make sure she wakes up hungry in the spring.



Advertising Agency: MARC USA, Chicago, USA

Executive Creative Director: Joe Burke

Creative Director: Stephanie Franke

Associate Creative Director / Copywriter: Jeff Norman

Associate Creative Director / Art Director: Chad Hangen

Photographer: Zack Burris

Retoucher: Bill Sheffler

Published: September 2014







via Business Feeds

Eat24: Hangry

















Advertising Agency: Hub Strategy, USA

Production Company: Hub Strategy & Communication

Director: DJ O'Neil

Producer: Jeremy Cook

Director of Photography: Greg Schmitt

Production Designer: Alex Fymat

Hub Creative Director: Peter Judd

Hub Associate Creative Director / Copywriter: Hugh Gurin

Production Coordinator: Zoe Drazen







via Business Feeds

Voters face epic choice at general election – over the size of the state

On 7 May, electors will be offered the starkest choice in a generation. We weigh up the radically different Tory and Labour spending plans


For two decades and more, it has been a truism in British political campaigning that where spending the public’s hard-earned cash is concerned, there is mortal danger in allowing too much space to open up between you and the opposition.


Make too many spending pledges, or venture a modest tax rise or two, and you risk being tethered to a giant, Zeppelin-style “tax bombshell”, looming over anxious households (Labour, 1992). Pledge to make deeper cuts than your rivals, and they can paint you as a brutal, Thatcher-style job-snatcher, taunting you with questions about how many nurses, teachers and doctors you plan to sack to meet your spending targets (copyright G Brown).


Continue reading...



via Business Feeds

Using An Ad Blocker Is Unethical

Using an ad blockers allows people to take obtain something of value without paying for it. This is both unethical and disrespectful.

















RSS: Business Feeds