Ten Tips for Locating Hourly Workers

With the economy improving, it is becoming more and more challenging to hire new employees. Here are ten tips for finding the best new hires.

Search for employees from other industries. “I often suggest people look for workers in places they don’t normally look,” said Darren Schulte, vice president of membership for NATSO.

One industry that truckstop and travel plaza operators can tap into is home health care. “They have very loyal employees that are used to taking care of people. What do we want in a cashier? Someone who is friendly and wants to help,” Schulte said.

Schulte also suggests operators look to the hotel industry when searching for custodians. “Both of these industries—hotels and home health care—don’t always pay well, so we may be able to offer these employees a higher salary than they were receiving,” he explained. “If you’re an organization that is looking for a full-time employee and you have benefits, you may be surprisedat the type of person you can find and hire in those industries.”

To find these employees, operators should look at how hotels and home health care centers recruit for employees. “My guess is they aren’t advertising through the help wanted sign,” Schulte said, adding that operators could reach out to a local staffing agency to let them know what types of positions the travel plaza has available.

Make recruiting an ongoing process. Recruiting only when you have job openings can leave you at a disadvantage because you’ll most likely rush to fill the position, which could result in a bad hiring decision.

Focus on word-of-mouth advertising. While technology has brought about more employee recruiting innovations, such as job boards, websites and social media, referrals from existing employees, vendors and customers are still one of the top ways to find a new hire. You should also be on the lookout for good customer service. Whether you’re checking out at the grocery store or ordering coffee at Starbucks, keep an eye out for good service and let the person know that you are always in the market for friendly, helpful employees.

Put hiring information on your website. Adding a “Careers” or “Join Our Team” tab on your website can help spread the word about open positions. Even if you don’t have a current need, you can list the qualities you are looking for in potential hires.

Use social media. If you’ve already cultivated an online presence (see related story on page 18), you can spread the word through your social media channels.

Use local job boards. Look into all of the resources available in your community. These vary by region, but they could include online listings via local television stations or newspapers or community Facebook pages.

Cultivate a relationship with your local schools. You can introduce your business to local high schools, tech schools and colleges by sponsoring events on campus. You can also create a more formal internship program for certain positions.

Know what you are looking for in an employee. Create a job description for every position, which will help you identify the qualities your employee needs to have.

Make it easy to apply. Putting systems in place, such as job applications that can be submitted online, that make it easy for potential hires to apply can increase the number of applicants. See suggestions at right.

Maintain a reputation as a good place to work. Keeping facilities nice, being involved in the community and treating employees fairly will all affect the number of job applicants a location receives.



via Business Feeds

Cast Your Vote for Your Top Small Business Influencer Pick

small biz influencer

You nominated them and now it’s time to cast your vote to support your pick. Small Business Trends and Small Biz Technology bring you the Small Business Influencer Awards 2015. Here’s a chance to celebrate the people, businesses, and even apps that have made an impact in the small business market.

Even if you missed the nominations, you can still jump in and vote for your favorite. But you might want to hurry. There is less than a week left to vote!

To see a full list or to submit your own event, contest or award listing, visit the Small Business Events Calendar.



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

UnGagged LasVegas 2015UnGagged LasVegas 2015
November 9, 2015, Las Vegas, Nevada

Google now makes 1 to 2 algorithm adjustments each day. With change happening that fast, the best efforts on the planet won’t help you without the right knowledge of what’s working today.

Ungagged is an intimate setting limited to just a few hundred attendees. You’ll hear from some of the most respected speakers in the world in their specialties — people like Duane Forrester of Bing; Loren Baker, founder of Search Engine Journal; Ruth Carter, a lawyer who knows social media law; Kaspar Szymanski, formerly of Google; and many more.

They’ll be talking about topics like how to get PR for your startup, streamlining your content marketing, social media horror stories, how to launch a software-as-a-service (SaaS) business, how to scale your business to a multi-million dollar valuation in 12 months, SEO myths debunked, and lots more. Anita Campbell, founder of Small Business Trends will be there and invites you to attend with our special community discount.

Discount Code
SBT (20% )


World Business Forum New York 2015World Business Forum New York 2015
November 12, 2015, New York, New York

In 2015 the World Business Forum will present two days of powerful stories; of individuals who face shocks – both personal and organizational – and who use those shocks to achieve the extraordinary. Speakers include Sir Richard Branson, Jim Collins, a former faculty member at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Walter Isaacson, once the 14th editor of TIME magazine in 1996 and named Chairman and CEO of CNN in 2001, Adam Grant, author of the New York Times bestseller Give and Take and Herminia Ibarra, Professor of Leadership and Learning and Professor of Organizational Behavior at INSEAD.


SleeterConSleeterCon
November 16, 2015, Las Vegas, Nevada

SleeterCon is the accounting solutions conference for professionals to learn and differentiate their practices, with in-depth education to prepare for the future.
Discount Code
CRUSHZONE50 ($50)


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends and SmallBizTechnology.


Vote Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Cast Your Vote for Your Top Small Business Influencer Pick" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Cast Your Vote for Your Top Small Business Influencer Pick

small biz influencer

You nominated them and now it’s time to cast your vote to support your pick. Small Business Trends and Small Biz Technology bring you the Small Business Influencer Awards 2015. Here’s a chance to celebrate the people, businesses, and even apps that have made an impact in the small business market.

Even if you missed the nominations, you can still jump in and vote for your favorite. But you might want to hurry. There is less than a week left to vote!

To see a full list or to submit your own event, contest or award listing, visit the Small Business Events Calendar.



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

UnGagged LasVegas 2015UnGagged LasVegas 2015
November 9, 2015, Las Vegas, Nevada

Google now makes 1 to 2 algorithm adjustments each day. With change happening that fast, the best efforts on the planet won’t help you without the right knowledge of what’s working today.

Ungagged is an intimate setting limited to just a few hundred attendees. You’ll hear from some of the most respected speakers in the world in their specialties — people like Duane Forrester of Bing; Loren Baker, founder of Search Engine Journal; Ruth Carter, a lawyer who knows social media law; Kaspar Szymanski, formerly of Google; and many more.

They’ll be talking about topics like how to get PR for your startup, streamlining your content marketing, social media horror stories, how to launch a software-as-a-service (SaaS) business, how to scale your business to a multi-million dollar valuation in 12 months, SEO myths debunked, and lots more. Anita Campbell, founder of Small Business Trends will be there and invites you to attend with our special community discount.

Discount Code
SBT (20% )


World Business Forum New York 2015World Business Forum New York 2015
November 12, 2015, New York, New York

In 2015 the World Business Forum will present two days of powerful stories; of individuals who face shocks – both personal and organizational – and who use those shocks to achieve the extraordinary. Speakers include Sir Richard Branson, Jim Collins, a former faculty member at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Walter Isaacson, once the 14th editor of TIME magazine in 1996 and named Chairman and CEO of CNN in 2001, Adam Grant, author of the New York Times bestseller Give and Take and Herminia Ibarra, Professor of Leadership and Learning and Professor of Organizational Behavior at INSEAD.


SleeterConSleeterCon
November 16, 2015, Las Vegas, Nevada

SleeterCon is the accounting solutions conference for professionals to learn and differentiate their practices, with in-depth education to prepare for the future.
Discount Code
CRUSHZONE50 ($50)


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends and SmallBizTechnology.


Vote Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Cast Your Vote for Your Top Small Business Influencer Pick" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Adapt to Business Changes with These Community Tips

adaptation

Running a business means you have to constantly adapt. You have to adapt to new technologies, busy seasons, sales slumps, and so much more.

In this week’s Small Business Trends Community News and Information Roundup, members of the small business community shared some tips and thoughts about changes you deal with when running a business and how to adapt to them.

Learn to Analyze Your Website’s Heat Maps

(ClickTale)

Heat maps can help you gain some valuable insights into how customers are using your website. They can show you where customers focus their attention and where they click most often. To learn more about heat maps and how to use them for your business, check out the advice by Merav Keren.

Create a Winning Holiday Marketing Strategy

(Allin1Social)

The upcoming holiday season means big opportunities for many small businesses. But you need to be ready to capitalize on those opportunities by creating a winning holiday marketing strategy. Emma Koitola shares some tips for doing so.

Keep Up with These Changes to LinkedIn Groups

(Jonny Ross Consultancy)

If you use LinkedIn groups, you may have noticed some changes recently. Jonny Ross explains five of the recent changes to LinkedIn groups and how they could impact your business. BizSugar members also share their input.

Attract the Best Seasonal Retail Employees

(Noobpreneur)

If you own a retail store, then you’re likely gearing up for your busiest time of year. That also probably means that you’ll need to hire some seasonal employees to help with the extra customers. To attract the best seasonal retail employees, read these tips from Chad Stewart.

Create Videos to Increase Audience Reach Online

(Zimana Web Analytics Blog)

Video marketing is a relatively new facet of online media. And as such, many brands don’t know where to start with it. But there are plenty of different ways you can use video to increase your reach online, as Pierre DeBois explains. You can also see discussion about the post over on BizSugar.

Get Social With Your Small Biz Marketing

(Grasshopper)

Marketing with social media means more than just posting product links or new blog posts. There are plenty of different ways to use social in your small business marketing, and plenty of benefits that go along with it. Taylor Tomita discusses the subject.

Generate Repeat Business Through Quality and Service

(SmallBizDaily)

There are so many tips and tricks out there for bringing customers to your business and keeping them. But sometimes the best way to do that is just by offering the best possible products and services to your customers. Dan Byers discusses generating repeat business through quality and service.

Read These Top Entrepreneur Blogs

(Project Be Best)

If you want to be the best entrepreneur you can, you need to learn from the best. Plenty of entrepreneurs share their expertise through blogs. And Roberto Zanon rounded up 59 of the best entrepreneurial blogs. BizSugar members also share their thoughts.

Read the Best of Internet Marketing

(Matthew Woodward)

It’s also important to keep up with news, trends and expert input, like what’s shared by Matthew Woodward. You can learn a lot by seeing what other business owners and professionals have to say about Internet marketing.

Implement a Strategic Marketing Process

(StuartJDavidson)

Marketing isn’t something you can just leave to chance. Having a strategic marketing process in place can help you stay on top of these activities and achieve better results. Stuart J. Davidson discusses more about marketing processes. And BizSugar members also share their thoughts.

You can help make these community roundup posts even better! Share your favorite small business content by sending it to sbtips@gmail.com or sharing it with the BizSugar community. You could see it in an upcoming post.


Adapting Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Adapt to Business Changes with These Community Tips" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Adapt to Business Changes with These Community Tips

adaptation

Running a business means you have to constantly adapt. You have to adapt to new technologies, busy seasons, sales slumps, and so much more.

In this week’s Small Business Trends Community News and Information Roundup, members of the small business community shared some tips and thoughts about changes you deal with when running a business and how to adapt to them.

Learn to Analyze Your Website’s Heat Maps

(ClickTale)

Heat maps can help you gain some valuable insights into how customers are using your website. They can show you where customers focus their attention and where they click most often. To learn more about heat maps and how to use them for your business, check out the advice by Merav Keren.

Create a Winning Holiday Marketing Strategy

(Allin1Social)

The upcoming holiday season means big opportunities for many small businesses. But you need to be ready to capitalize on those opportunities by creating a winning holiday marketing strategy. Emma Koitola shares some tips for doing so.

Keep Up with These Changes to LinkedIn Groups

(Jonny Ross Consultancy)

If you use LinkedIn groups, you may have noticed some changes recently. Jonny Ross explains five of the recent changes to LinkedIn groups and how they could impact your business. BizSugar members also share their input.

Attract the Best Seasonal Retail Employees

(Noobpreneur)

If you own a retail store, then you’re likely gearing up for your busiest time of year. That also probably means that you’ll need to hire some seasonal employees to help with the extra customers. To attract the best seasonal retail employees, read these tips from Chad Stewart.

Create Videos to Increase Audience Reach Online

(Zimana Web Analytics Blog)

Video marketing is a relatively new facet of online media. And as such, many brands don’t know where to start with it. But there are plenty of different ways you can use video to increase your reach online, as Pierre DeBois explains. You can also see discussion about the post over on BizSugar.

Get Social With Your Small Biz Marketing

(Grasshopper)

Marketing with social media means more than just posting product links or new blog posts. There are plenty of different ways to use social in your small business marketing, and plenty of benefits that go along with it. Taylor Tomita discusses the subject.

Generate Repeat Business Through Quality and Service

(SmallBizDaily)

There are so many tips and tricks out there for bringing customers to your business and keeping them. But sometimes the best way to do that is just by offering the best possible products and services to your customers. Dan Byers discusses generating repeat business through quality and service.

Read These Top Entrepreneur Blogs

(Project Be Best)

If you want to be the best entrepreneur you can, you need to learn from the best. Plenty of entrepreneurs share their expertise through blogs. And Roberto Zanon rounded up 59 of the best entrepreneurial blogs. BizSugar members also share their thoughts.

Read the Best of Internet Marketing

(Matthew Woodward)

It’s also important to keep up with news, trends and expert input, like what’s shared by Matthew Woodward. You can learn a lot by seeing what other business owners and professionals have to say about Internet marketing.

Implement a Strategic Marketing Process

(StuartJDavidson)

Marketing isn’t something you can just leave to chance. Having a strategic marketing process in place can help you stay on top of these activities and achieve better results. Stuart J. Davidson discusses more about marketing processes. And BizSugar members also share their thoughts.

You can help make these community roundup posts even better! Share your favorite small business content by sending it to sbtips@gmail.com or sharing it with the BizSugar community. You could see it in an upcoming post.


Adapting Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "Adapt to Business Changes with These Community Tips" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

The Steve Jobs Movie Casts Entrepreneurs as Orchestra Conductors

jobs movie

Steve Jobs, the movie about the late entrepreneur behind Apple, bombed at the box office in its first weekend of release. And critics’ reviews have been mixed. But the movie may be best remembered for is one scene in particular, where Jobs sheds some light on what it’s like being an entrepreneur.

The scene features a conversation between Jobs and his former Apple partner Steve Wozniak. As it turns out, Wozniak was one of the few people who actually enjoyed the film, saying that although fictional, it captured Jobs’ personality quite well. But it’s also worth noting that he was a paid consultant for the movie.

Friends and colleagues of Jobs criticized the movie for taking too many artistic liberties. Jobs’ widow has been very vocal about her dislike for the film and even reportedly tried to halt its production. Even current Apple CEO, Tim Cook, has made comments about the “opportunistic” nature of the movie and others like it.

The Steve Jobs movie, which was written by Aaron Sorkin, centers mainly around the lead up to three major Apple events.

However, it’s not just about the entrepreneurial aspect of Jobs’ life. There’s also a major story line surrounding Jobs’ refusal to acknowledge paternity of his daughter Lisa. Overall, it doesn’t paint Jobs in a very favorable light. It shows some of the worst aspects of his character without focusing much on the brilliance and drive that led him and Apple to be so successful.

Sorkin has stated that the film is fictional and not meant to be a biopic. But given that it’s based on a real person and shows some actual events that took place, some people are bound to look at it that way.

Still, the movie is not completely anti-Jobs. There is, at the very least, the one scene where Jobs speaks to Wozniak about entrepreneurship. In it, he compares entrepreneurs to orchestra conductors. You can view the scene in its entirety below:

“What do you do?” Wozniak (Seth Rogen) asks.

Jobs (Michael Fassbender) responds: “I play the orchestra. And you’re a good musician. You sit right there. You’re the best in your row.”

It doesn’t exactly depict a friendly conversation. In it, Wozniak accuses Jobs of being condescending toward him, even though he was an integral part of building Apple. But could Jobs have a point about his role at Apple? And about entrepreneurs in general, for that matter?

It’s a unique way of looking at entrepreneurship. As Wozniak notes in the scene, Jobs wasn’t an engineer, designer or coder. He wasn’t responsible for much of the actual building of Apple’s early innovative devices.

But as most entrepreneurs know, there’s so much more that goes into building a successful business than just constructing a product that works. You have to find a market for that product, build a team around it, make people want to associate with your brand, and much more.

You have to direct the members of your team to build, market and support the vision that you have for your company.

As an entrepreneur, you need to be the conductor of your business – the one who makes sure that all the different facets work together harmoniously. That’s what Steve Jobs was for Apple. At least according to his character in the Steve Jobs movie. And that’s what many other great entrepreneurs have been for their businesses, whether they’ve really looked at it that way or not.

Do you agree that great entrepreneurs are like orchestra conductors?

Image: “Steve Jobs”

This article, "The Steve Jobs Movie Casts Entrepreneurs as Orchestra Conductors" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

The Steve Jobs Movie Casts Entrepreneurs as Orchestra Conductors

jobs movie

Steve Jobs, the movie about the late entrepreneur behind Apple, bombed at the box office in its first weekend of release. And critics’ reviews have been mixed. But the movie may be best remembered for is one scene in particular, where Jobs sheds some light on what it’s like being an entrepreneur.

The scene features a conversation between Jobs and his former Apple partner Steve Wozniak. As it turns out, Wozniak was one of the few people who actually enjoyed the film, saying that although fictional, it captured Jobs’ personality quite well. But it’s also worth noting that he was a paid consultant for the movie.

Friends and colleagues of Jobs criticized the movie for taking too many artistic liberties. Jobs’ widow has been very vocal about her dislike for the film and even reportedly tried to halt its production. Even current Apple CEO, Tim Cook, has made comments about the “opportunistic” nature of the movie and others like it.

The Steve Jobs movie, which was written by Aaron Sorkin, centers mainly around the lead up to three major Apple events.

However, it’s not just about the entrepreneurial aspect of Jobs’ life. There’s also a major story line surrounding Jobs’ refusal to acknowledge paternity of his daughter Lisa. Overall, it doesn’t paint Jobs in a very favorable light. It shows some of the worst aspects of his character without focusing much on the brilliance and drive that led him and Apple to be so successful.

Sorkin has stated that the film is fictional and not meant to be a biopic. But given that it’s based on a real person and shows some actual events that took place, some people are bound to look at it that way.

Still, the movie is not completely anti-Jobs. There is, at the very least, the one scene where Jobs speaks to Wozniak about entrepreneurship. In it, he compares entrepreneurs to orchestra conductors. You can view the scene in its entirety below:

“What do you do?” Wozniak (Seth Rogen) asks.

Jobs (Michael Fassbender) responds: “I play the orchestra. And you’re a good musician. You sit right there. You’re the best in your row.”

It doesn’t exactly depict a friendly conversation. In it, Wozniak accuses Jobs of being condescending toward him, even though he was an integral part of building Apple. But could Jobs have a point about his role at Apple? And about entrepreneurs in general, for that matter?

It’s a unique way of looking at entrepreneurship. As Wozniak notes in the scene, Jobs wasn’t an engineer, designer or coder. He wasn’t responsible for much of the actual building of Apple’s early innovative devices.

But as most entrepreneurs know, there’s so much more that goes into building a successful business than just constructing a product that works. You have to find a market for that product, build a team around it, make people want to associate with your brand, and much more.

You have to direct the members of your team to build, market and support the vision that you have for your company.

As an entrepreneur, you need to be the conductor of your business – the one who makes sure that all the different facets work together harmoniously. That’s what Steve Jobs was for Apple. At least according to his character in the Steve Jobs movie. And that’s what many other great entrepreneurs have been for their businesses, whether they’ve really looked at it that way or not.

Do you agree that great entrepreneurs are like orchestra conductors?

Image: “Steve Jobs”

This article, "The Steve Jobs Movie Casts Entrepreneurs as Orchestra Conductors" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

7 Psychology-Backed Hacks for Boosting Your Motivation

This post originally appeared on HubSpot's Sales Blog. To read more content like this,subscribe to Sales.

Motivation is crucial in any professional environment. Trouble is, staying motivated is often easier said than done.

No matter what industry you're working in, you’re bound to encounter days with more bad than good. This is no reason to give up.

After all, success comes when you push through the frustrating times and focus your efforts and energy on accomplishing one goal at a time. 

To help you keep pushing forward in whatever you're doing, we've compiled seven science-backed tips for sustaining motivation in the workplace. From finding your "why" to accepting rejection, we're willing to bet that these tips will make a noticeable difference in your day.

7 Psychology-Backed Hacks for Boosting Your Motivation

1) Remind yourself of what you love about your job.

There are two fundamental types of motivation -- extrinsic and intrinsic. When you’re extrinsically motivated, you’re driven to act because of external incentives, like money, recognition, or praise.

Intrinsic motivation, behavior driven by the simple enjoyment of a task, is a more powerful force. Richard Griggs, a psychology professor, writes, “A person’s intrinsic enjoyment of an activity provides sufficient justification for their behavior.”

Try writing down a physical list of everything you enjoy about your job, or keeping a running tab of on-the-job moments that made you happy. The important thing is to be able to quickly refer back to a list of positive moments that will provide you a jolt of intrinsic motivation.

2) Find your “why.”

The intrinsic-extrinsic dichotomy is further explored in the push-pull theory of motivation. According to this theory, humans are either pulled to do something because of internal motivation, or pushed because of external factors.

“Pull-based motivation is about tapping the desire to achieve something,” entrepreneur Jonathan Fields writes in Psychology Today. “It’s about taking action not to remove a current pain, but to bring yourself closer to a deeply desired end.”

So when you’re feeling discouraged, remind yourself of why you got into your industry, and what you’re striving for long-term. With a clearly defined purpose, finding your intrinsic motivation to keep going is far easier.

3) Expect a certain amount of rejection.

Instead of treating rejection as something to be afraid of or an unpleasant surprise, build the expectation that a certain number of potential customers are going to say “no” into your day.

Expectancy theory, pioneered by Victor Vroom, states that people choose to act a certain way based on their expectations of what will happen.

A caveat: This only applies to a normal level of rejection. If no one is converting or expressing interest in the content you're putting out, it might be time to take a closer look at your approach with your manager or peers.

4) Frame potential pitfalls as opportunities.

Research shows that high achievers tend to be achievement-oriented, rather than failure-avoiding. Achievement-motivated people gain satisfaction from succeeding at difficult tasks. Failure-avoiding individuals are primarily concerned with -- you guessed it -- avoiding a screwup.

Failure-avoiding people “are less likely to attempt achievement-oriented tasks, and may give up quickly if success is not readily forthcoming,” according to psychologist Carl Beuke. Not too inspiring, right?

To put yourself in the mindset of a high achiever, frame risks as opportunities. Sure, not everyone is going to be in waiting at their computer to tweet out your latest blog post, but it's more productive to view your post as a step in the right direction towards educating your prospects. Coming from a positive place rather than a place of fear will go a long way to keeping you motivated.

5) Set specific short- and long-term goals.

It’s important to keep in mind your blue-sky goals -- that is, where you want to be in five or 10 years. But five or 10 years is a long time. What are you supposed to reach for in the meantime?

Sports psychologist Frank Smoll suggests setting goals for the short- and long-term. 

Short-term goals allow people to “see immediate improvements in performance and thereby enhance motivation,” Smoll writes in Psychology Today.

On the other hand, relying purely on lofty goals is actually damaging, as it ignores “the sub-goals needed to attain them.” And this results in a failure to achieve much of anything at all.

6) Remember that it’s not personal.

It’s natural to take rejection personally because humans are inherently social beings. But in marketing and sales, it’s unproductive.

“Taking things personally keeps you tied to someone else,” psychiatrist Abigail Brenner writes in Psychology Today. And if you’re tying yourself to every failed opportunity, you’re going to become overwhelmed with disappointment in short order.

To get some distance from an unpleasant situation, Brenner suggests evaluating what the relationship you have with the person who upset you really meant to you.

7) Go take a walk.

The arousal theory of motivation proposes that humans act to correct imbalances in neurological activity. That is, that when we’re either over- or under-stimulated, we subconsciously behave in ways that bring us back to a healthy level of arousal.

You can stay one step ahead of your subconscious, however. If you feel yourself getting agitated or frustrated, remove yourself from the situation. Leave the office for a quick stroll, stop by a coworker’s desk for a quick chat, or just take a bathroom break. By doing something relaxing, you’ll be able to center yourself and re-focus on the task at hand.

How do you stay motivated? Let us know in the comments below.

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via Business Feeds

“The Optimistic Workplace” Shows Managing Happiness is Part of Your Job

optimistic bookAs stated in “The Optimistic Workplace: Creating an Environment That Energizes Everyone” the mission of the book is two-fold. The first “is to show that work can be a source of fulfillment, joy and happiness.”

The second is to show that creating happy human beings leads to a better business.

Sounds like an impossible mission? Not according to Shawn Murphy. Murphy, an organizational development consultant, believes that happiness is within the reach of every single business. The path, his book explains, starts from an unlikely place. It starts, Murphy argues, with management.

What “The Optimistic Workplace” is About

Dealing with staff, time sheets, and keeping the office running smoothly rarely creates a feeling of optimism. Yet that is the mindset that “The Optimistic Workplace” wants to challenge. Murphy writes that, under the right conditions, every work environment has the capacity to encourage and foster happiness.

Work environments, according to Murphy, have suffered from an antiquated and authoritarian management paradigm that only focuses on getting results. In this kind of environment, creating a happy workplace is an afterthought. That approach, however, has come back to haunt a lot of managers. Research has shown that businesses suffer from decreasing productivity, declining morale, and increasing dissatisfaction (a.k.a. the “I’m only here for the paycheck” syndrome) among employees.

Instead, “The Optimistic Workplace” focuses on helping managers actively create a positive, collaborative environment that focuses more on employee happiness than has been traditional in business. The book features a plethora of insights, based on psychological research, which demonstrate that happy employees are also more productive. The research goes on to suggest that fostering happiness in your employees doesn’t always require giving them a raise or a bonus. It could be as simple as giving a compliment, entrusting them with a challenging project or asking for their input.

What Murphy is trying to push managers (and ultimately society) to do is question the core beliefs about work and happiness. It should be common practice, according to Murphy, not an exception, for employees to be made to feel that they matter in the workplace. Work should be a place of innovation, not unnecessary limits.

The shift Murphy is looking for begins when managers step up to the challenge of transforming our words and actions with the employees that work with them. It continues when that shift becomes a way of life for all of us.

What Was Best About This Book

The best part of “The Optimistic Workplace” is the book’s focus on more than the “You need happy employees” message that can be found in other books. And it provides more research and a deeper analysis of what goes into creating a happier workplace.

The book also challenges readers to go beyond traditionally accepted beliefs and management practices. For example, research discussed in “The Optimistic Workplace” shows that ostracism is actually more harmful than bullying. How many of us would have thought the opposite? This kind of challenge to a reader’s thinking is exactly what the author needs to inspire change.

What Could Have Been Done Differently

The book places a lot more attention on the extremes in the case studies. Murphy talks about big companies, like Bamboo HR and others, with larger resources than the typical small business owner or entrepreneur. This can lead to the perception that companies with big pockets are the only ones that can afford to create change. The book attempts to refute this notion, but could do it better with case studies and advice geared to the small business.

Why Read This Book

“The Optimistic Workplace” provides a more detailed discussion of the “How do we improve employee morale?” question. It goes further than the typical advice about better employee appreciation and challenges managers to create and actively maintain a positive work environment over the long term rather than short term.

Murphy also provides more of the research behind what it takes to maintain a productive work environment, which sometimes contradicts traditional beliefs about work and happiness. It is crucial to challenge these key beliefs in order to truly improve employee morale and loyalty over the long term.

About the Author

Shawn Murphy (@TheShawnMurphy) is an author,speaker, Huffington post blogger, CEO and founder of Switch and Shift, an organizational transformation consulting company.

This article, "“The Optimistic Workplace” Shows Managing Happiness is Part of Your Job" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds