13 Email Examples That Totally Nailed Personalization

If you're anything like most people, you can probably rattle off 100 different things you'd rather do than dig through your inbox.

It starts to feel like a chore, because what's in there isn't very interesting. In fact, only 21% of consumers reported that they've received a memorable promotional email in the past two months, according to a study by Litmus.

To overcome that, many brands are using email personalization as a strategy for creating more engaging email experiences -- ones that feel less like a robot, and more like a friend.

The best part? Email personalization doesn't need to be insanely complicated to resonate with recipients. To see what I mean, check out these 13 great email examples that cleverly use personalization.

13 Personalized Email Examples You Can't Help but Click

1) OpenTable

As you may have gathered from my bio, there are few things in life that bring me as much joy as a remarkable meal. That's why OpenTable is one of my favorite brands. Not only does it easy to make reservations online, but it also remembers my favorite restaurants, and helps me discover new ones based on my reviews and reservation behavior.

One way OpenTable encourages me to leave reviews is by sending me an email with a personalized subject line asking me how my most recent meal was that I booked through this platform.

Because these reviews help OpenTable figure out which restaurant recommendations to make for me, I'm already encouraged -- but a personalized, specific subject line with a reminder of where my last reservation was, helps to boost my engagement.

2) JetBlue

Oh, JetBlue. You shouldn't have.

This anniversary email highlights a creative example of a brand using something as simple as a date to provide a standout experience. Much like a birthday shout out, JetBlue used my colleague's account creation date to trigger a personalized email to celebrate the fact that they've been "emailing for 365 days now."

If you're a HubSpot customer, this is an easy email to replicate for your contacts through a fixed date or property-based workflows. It allows you to base your workflow on a calendar or contact property date, so you can send anniversary emails, digital birthday cards, renewal reminders, and more. And if your business is sending a high volume of these emails, we also offer the Transactional Email Add-On.

3) Spotify

Here's another great personalized email example that leverages a user's interests to provide a relevant, value-packed message.

The copy in this email from Spotify is particularly effective because it frames the personalization in a way that makes the recipient feel like they're being rewarded for their usage. Phrases like "top listener" and "be the first to get access" lend themselves to a sense of exclusivity -- making the user feel important.

The email also closes with a written call-to-action that encourages the recipient to listen to Charles Kelley's new song -- specifically on Spotify. Again, this push helps to ensure that the user is actively using the streaming service, and therefore continuously reminded of the value.

4) Amazon

A few Halloweens ago, HubSpot's blogging team dressed as the dancing pumpkin man from this viral video. (And, in case you're wondering, we dressed as a bunch of bananas last year.) But before opting to DIY our own orange masks, my colleague, Lindsay Kolowich, set out on an Amazon search to find us the real deal.

Within just a couple of days, she received this personalized email from Amazon featuring "products similar to 'full face plastic pumpkin masks'." (Some of them are quite scary, aren't they?)

This email serves as a great example of how to use a contact's search behavior to re-engage them with your company, and hopefully move them closer to a sale.

5) LinkedIn

Once upon a time, before I worked for HubSpot -- practically another lifetime, it feels like -- I was about to graduate from business school and actively applying for jobs.

I often used LinkedIn for my search -- a business-focused social network that was paying attention the type of listings I responded to. Each day, LinkedIn sent me a roundup jobs it thought would pique my interest.

LinkedIn

What's interesting about this email is that LinkedIn wasn't using it to earn my paid business. Rather, LinkedIn seemed to be keeping a close eye, algorithmically, to the locations and type of work I was seeking. While some of the listings were more applicable than others, all of them were clickable.

Did you catch that? Clickable. And even if none of these jobs piqued my interest, I had about 250 classmates who might have considered them, driving even more traffic to LinkedIn's website.

So think about what's going to make your content clickable, and how you can use personalized emails to drive traffic to your site. Then, set up workflows that remind subscribers how to continue taking advantage of these specially-tailored messages.

6) The Bowery Presents

I received this email back when I was living in New York address, but it still serves as a great example of how to use location information to provide a customized email experience.

In the email, The Bowery Presents pulled shows from New York venues -- where I purchased tickets for many events when I lived there -- for artists similar to the ones I saw live.

The Bowery Presents

And when I finally purchased tickets to see one of these artists in Boston? It re-personalized my emails to let me know about shows here.

By making it easy for me to quickly visualize what's headed to the area and when, The Bowery Presents is able to lower the barrier between me and the point of purchase.

This type of personalization could be extremely beneficial for a company looking to deliver more relevant messages to international leads or existing customers.

7) Twitter

After following one of her favorite brunch spots on Twitter, my colleague Corey Wainwright received this email from the social network with suggestions for similar accounts to follow.

What's more is that the suggestions were actually super relevant -- turns out, a couple of them were just right around the corner from her. (Hello, new grub options.)

twitter email mkt resized 600

When companies have as much data as Twitter does, they usually go one of two ways with personalization: They totally hit the nail on the head, or they have too much data to sift out what's important. This is an example of accurately identifying what Corey would actually care about, and delivering it to her.

8) Hawaiian Airlines

There are few places on the planet that I love more than Hawaii. I'm constantly thinking about my next trip there, but for a while, could never quite commit to booking it.

That is, until I received this special birthday email from Hawaiian Airlines. In keeping with the Hawaiian tradition of presenting someone with a lei on his or her birthday, the airline instead chose to present me with 500 bonus miles, just for booking a trip within the next year. Aloha, indeed.

Hawaiian Airlines

There's more than one noteworthy thing about this email. First, the only reason I received it is that I'm enrolled in the Hawaiian Airlines mileage program, and getting emails like these is just one of the "rewards" of membership. Plus, the airline understands that I joined for a reason -- because at some point, I planned to visit Hawaii again.

With that in mind, Hawaiian Airlines used this personalized email to give me an incentive to finally book that trip, with a birthday greeting to boot. That's a great way for brands to achieve customer reactivation -- by using a fixed date, like a birthday or anniversary, to remind people what it was that they loved about your business in the first place. By offering something special from your brand to commemorate the occasion, you're giving your audience the motivation to take action and making a purchase.

9) HubSpot Academy

There's a thing about licenses and certifications. They're valuable. They help you master knowledge and become an expert. Having them makes you look good. But they also have to be kept up-to-date, and unless you're reminded, letting them expire can be all too easy.

If you have any HubSpot certifications, you know that doesn't have to be the case. Our Academy team creates personalized emails to let certification-holders know which ones they currently possess, which ones need to be renewed, which ones might be helpful to add to their credentials, and when new certifications are available.

HubSpot Mail - A new certification course by HubSpot Academy

Eric Peters, the senior growth marketing manager with HubSpot Academy, explained the technology that makes emails like these work. Each certification box in the above email is made "smart," to show users which certifications are available to them.

"All nine certifications are available to partners. Eight are available to customers, and four to non-customers," Peters says. "Each one of those certifications has a Smart CTA that appears as a different color, depending on whether the user is actively certified -- which means they passed within the last 395 days -- expired, or incomplete."

"In other words," he explains, "it's a bunch of Smart CTAs embedded in a smart rich text box. The CTAs point to the splash page describing the certification."

(HubSpot Professional and Enterprise customers: You can create Smart CTAs like these in your own emails with your HubSpot CTA tool.)

10) Netflix

Am I the only one that spends more time looking for a movie on Netflix than I do actually watching it?

Aware that its database can be overwhelming, Netflix regularly sends out these personalized emails that suggest movies for its users. (If you want to learn more about the science behind the Netflix algorithms, you can brush up on it here.)

By providing a custom recommendation, Netflix helps ensure that users are actively seeing the value of their subscription. In other words, it keeps them watching, which ultimately keeps them paying.

This approach could be applied to a number of marketing materials -- ebooks, webinars, and blog articles, to name a few. For example, if you find that someone downloaded an ebook on social media tips, you may want to set up a workflow to trigger a follow-up email that suggests they check out your social media guide on SlideShare.

11) Pinterest

In an effort to keep my friend Ginny Mineo pinning, Pinterest sent her this personalized email. Based on her past activity on the site, the social network provided some suggestions for other topics she may want to explore. (Butter, Lauren Conrad, and cheese -- I like your style, Ginny.)

And given that, at the time, she was planning a yellow-themed wedding, I'd say the results were pretty accurate.

What we love most about the email is its simplicity. It offers up just six topics, which is enough to interest the recipient without overwhelming her. Plus, the copy is quick, friendly, and clear.

12) WeddingWire

In other wedding-related news, Mineo also received this email example from WeddingWire, an online marketplace for venues, cakes, dresses, and other wedding-planning items.

While the copy was clever in and of itself, what really struck us was the personalization used in the subject line. After all, your recipients aren't going to see the content unless you persuade them to click first, right?

By using a witty, custom hashtag -- #GinnysLastHurrah -- in the subject line, WeddingWire inspired her to click on the email, check out their tool for creating hashtags, and forward the email to the rest of us.

If you want to boost the word-of-mouth influence behind your product or service, you should consider how personalization can help propel your message.

13) Birchbox

Birchbox is a company that's fixated on personalization in all the right ways -- and all it takes is one glance at the header of this email to see why it's effective.

Birchbox transparently admitted that they took a peek at my colleague Carly Stec's sample and purchase history before crafting this email. That gave her the sense that what came next would likely be relevant to her -- and it was.

These little, personalized messages always reinforce why Carly continues to subscribe to the Birchbox service -- they strengthen her loyalty.

Let's Get Personal

With 62% of millennials feeling that online content drives their loyalty to a brand, and 46% of U.S. consumers admitting that they’re more likely to switch providers than they were 10 years ago -- it's clear that fostering loyalty through personalization should be a priority.

It may seem like a big undertaking, but by observing, understanding, and investing in the behavior of your customers, you can help to ensure that they'll stay customers. So start getting personal -- and building loyalty.



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Unfiltered: How to Show Up in Local Search Results

Posted by sherrybonelli

If you're having trouble getting your local business' website to show up in the Google local 3-pack or local search results in general, you're not alone. The first page of Google's search results seems to have gotten smaller over the years – the top and bottom of the page are often filled with ads, the local 7-pack was trimmed to a slim 3-pack, and online directories often take up the rest of page one. There is very little room for small local businesses to rank on the first page of Google.

To make matters worse, Google has a local "filter" that can strike a business, causing their listing to drop out of local search results for seemingly no reason – often, literally, overnight. Google's local filter has been around for a while, but it became more noticeable after the Possum algorithm update, which began filtering out even more businesses from local search results.

If you think about it, this filter is not much different than websites ranking organically in search results: In an ideal world, the best sites win the top spots. However, the Google filter can have a significantly negative impact on local businesses that often rely on showing up in local search results to get customers to their doors.

What causes a business to get filtered?

Just like the multitude of factors that go into ranking high organically, there are a variety of factors that go into ranking in the local 3-pack and the Local Finder.

http://ift.tt/2iNGREw

Here are a few situations that might cause you to get filtered and what you can do if that happens.

Proximity matters

With mobile search becoming more and more popular, Google takes into consideration where the mobile searcher is physically located when they're performing a search. This means that local search results can also depend on where the business is physically located when the search is being done.

A few years ago, if your business wasn't located in the large city in your area, you were at a significant disadvantage. It was difficult to rank when someone searched for "business category + large city" – simply because your business wasn't physically located in the "large city." Things have changed slightly in your favor – which is great for all the businesses who have a physical address in the suburbs.

According to Ben Fisher, Co-Founder of SteadyDemand.com and a Google Top Contributor, "Proximity and Google My Business data play an important role in the Possum filter. Before the Hawk Update, this was exaggerated and now the radius has been greatly reduced." This means there's hope for you to show up in the local search results – even if your business isn't located in a big city.

Google My Business categories

When you're selecting a Google My Business category for your listing, select the most specific category that's appropriate for your business.

However, if you see a competitor is outranking you, find out what category they are using and select the same category for your business (but only if it makes sense.) Then look at all the other things they are doing online to increase their organic ranking and emulate and outdo them.

If your category selections don't work, it's possible you've selected too many categories. Too many categories can confuse Google to the point where it's not sure what your company's specialty is. Try deleting some of the less-specific categories and see if that helps you show up.

Your physical address

If you can help it, don't have the same physical address as your competitors. Yes, this means if you're located in an office building (or worse, a "virtual office" or a UPS Store address) and competing companies are also in your building, your listing may not show up in local search results.

When it comes to sharing an address with a competitor, Ben Fisher recommends, "Ensure that you do not have the same primary category as your competitor if you are in the same building. Their listing may have more trust by Google and you would have a higher chance of being filtered."

Also, many people think that simply adding a suite number to your address will differentiate your address enough from a competitor at the same location — it won't. This is one of the biggest myths in local SEO. According to Fisher, "Google doesn't factor in suite numbers."

Additionally, if competing businesses are located physically close to you, that, too, can impact whether you show up in local search results. So if you have a competitor a block or two down from your company, that can lead to one of you being filtered.

Practitioners

If you're a doctor, attorney, accountant or are in some other industry with multiple professionals working in the same office location, Google may filter out some of your practitioners' listings. Why? Google doesn't want one business dominating the first page of Google local search results. This means that all of the practitioners in your company are essentially competing with one another.

To offset this, each practitioner's Google My Business listing should have a different category (if possible) and should be directed to different URLs (either a page about the practitioner or a page about the specialty – they should not all point to the site's home page).

For instance, at a medical practice, one doctor could select the family practice category and another the pediatrician category. Ideally you would want to change those doctors' landing pages to reflect those categories, too:

http://ift.tt/2zkeBAt
http://ift.tt/2iNKs5m

Another thing you can do to differentiate the practitioners and help curtail being filtered is to have unique local phone numbers for each of them.

Evaluate what your competitors are doing right

If your listing is getting filtered out, look at the businesses that are being displayed and see what they're doing right on Google Maps, Google+, Google My Business, on-site, off-site, and in any other areas you can think of. If possible, do an SEO site audit on their site to see what they're doing right that perhaps you should do to overtake them in the rankings.

When you're evaluating your competition, make sure you focus on the signals that help sites rank organically. Do they have a better Google+ description? Is their GMB listing completely filled out but yours is missing some information? Do they have more 5-star reviews? Do they have more backlinks? What is their business category? Start doing what they're doing – only better.

In general Google wants to show the best businesses first. Compete toe-to-toe with the competitors that are ranking higher than you with the goal of eventually taking over their highly-coveted spot.

Other factors that can help you show up in local search results

As mentioned earlier, Google considers a variety of data points when it determines which local listings to display in search results and which ones to filter out. Here are a few other signals to pay attention to when optimizing for local search results:

Reviews

If everything else is equal, do you have more 5-star reviews than your competition? If so, you will probably show up in the local search results instead of your competitors. Google is one of the few review sites that encourages businesses to proactively ask customers to leave reviews. Take that as a clue to ask customers to give you great reviews not only on your Google My Business listing but also on third-party review sites like Facebook, Yelp, and others.

Posts

Are you interacting with your visitors by offering something special to those who see your business listing? Engaging with your potential customers by creating a Post lets Google know that you are paying attention and giving its users a special deal. Having more "transactions and interactions" with your potential customers is a good metric and can help you show up in local search results.

Google+

Despite what the critics say, Google+ is not dead. Whenever you make a Facebook or Twitter post, go ahead and post to Google+, too. Write semantic posts that are relevant to your business and relevant to your potential customers. Try to write Google+ posts that are approximately 300 words in length and be sure to keyword optimize the first 100 words of each post. You can often see some minor increases in rankings due to well-optimized Google+ posts, properly optimized Collections, and an engaged audience.

Here's one important thing to keep in mind: Google+ is not the place to post content just to try and rank higher in local search. (That's called spam and that is a no-no.) Ensure that any post you make to Google+ is valuable to your end-users.

Keep your Google My Business listing current

Adding photos, updating your business hours for holidays, utilizing the Q&A or booking features, etc. can help you show off in rankings. However, don't add content just to try and rank higher. (Your Google My Business listing is not the place for spammy content.) Make sure the content you add to your GMB listing is both timely and high-quality content. By updating/adding content, Google knows that your information is likely accurate and that your business is engaged. Speaking of which...

Be engaged

Interacting with your customers online is not only beneficial for customer relations, but it can also be a signal to Google that can positively impact your local search ranking results. David Mihm, founder of Tidings, feels that by 2020, the difference-making local ranking factor will be engagement.

engagement-ranking-factor.jpg

(Source: The Difference-Making Local Ranking Factor of 2020)

According to Mihm, "Engagement is simply a much more accurate signal of the quality of local businesses than the traditional ranking factors of links, directory citations, and even reviews." This means you need to start preparing now and begin interacting with potential customers by using GMB's Q&A and booking features, instant messaging, Google+ posts, responding to Google and third-party reviews, ensure your website's phone number is "click-to-call" enabled, etc.

Consolidate any duplicate listings

Some business owners go overboard and create multiple Google My Business listings with the thought that more has to be better. This is one instance where having more can actually hurt you. If you discover that for whatever reason your business has more than one GMB listing, it's important that you properly consolidate your listings into one.

Other sources linking to your website

If verified data sources, like the Better Business Bureau, professional organizations and associations, chambers of commerce, online directories, etc. link to your website, that can have an impact on whether or not you show up on Google's radar. Make sure that your business is listed on as many high-quality and authoritative online directories as possible – and ensure that the information about your business – especially your company's Name, Address and Phone Number (NAP) -- is consistent and accurate.

So there you have it! Hopefully you found some ideas on what to do if your listing is being filtered on Google local results.

What are some tips that you have for keeping your business "unfiltered"?


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NATSO, Biodiesel Supply Chain Urge Tax-Writing Committees to Extend, Phase Out Biodiesel Tax Credit

NATSO and a diverse group of biodiesel producers, fuel retailers and trucking interests representing every segment of the biodiesel supply chain sent a letter the Senate Finance Committee and House Ways and Means Committee on Oct. 31 in support of extending and phasing out the biodiesel blenders’ tax credit, and outlining their opposition to efforts to shift the credit to a producers’ credit as the tax-writing committees consider tax reform legislation.

In the letter, the organizations said that the blenders’ credit has worked successfully to build a robust biodiesel and renewable diesel industry and that shifting to a producer credit would limit supply and raise the price of both diesel fuel and heating oil.

“Phasing out the blenders’ credit over five years makes sense in the context of comprehensive tax reform where Congress is looking to lower rates, simplify the tax code, and foster economic growth,” NATSO Vice President of Government Affairs David Fialkov said in a statement. “Shifting to a producers’ credit, on the other hand, is excessively complicated, would create a brand new tax expenditure and would result in higher fuel prices.

“What’s more, it divides the stakeholder community. Fuel retailers do not support a producer credit. You don’t have to be Nostradamus to see that a divided stakeholder community makes it less likely that the biodiesel tax credit will be extended in any form. That would be undesirable for everyone. The companies that would be hurt the most, however, are not retailers, who will continue to sell fuel that their customers want to buy. It will be the small biodiesel producers who are unwittingly beholden to a flawed advocacy strategy."

NATSO supports the viable off-ramp for the biodiesel tax credit introduced earlier this year by Representatives Diane Black (R-Tenn.) and Ron Kind (D-Wisc.). Under the phaseout proposed by Representatives Black and Kind, the tax credit amount for all biodiesel blenders would be $1.00 per gallon in 2017 and 2018, $0.75 per gallon in 2019, $0.50 per gallon in 2020 and 2021, and zero in 2022 and later.

Since 2005, the biodiesel blenders’ tax credit has helped build a robust diesel and renewable diesel industry by allowing industry to sell biodiesel to consumers at a price that is comparable to a gallon of regular diesel. In the last two years, the United States has enjoyed more than 2 billion gallons of diesel replacement fuels that reduce greenhouse gas emissions by greater than 50 percent relative to traditional diesel. Fuel retailers have struggled, however, amid market uncertainty created by the on and off again nature of the tax credit, which expired at the end of 2016.

The Commerce Department also recently announced a preliminary decision to require importers to pay cash deposits to the U.S. government on biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia, which obviates the need for a producer credit, further exacerbates existing market uncertainty and upends the biofuels market by impeding access to cleaner-burning biodiesel produced abroad. It also will disrupt the Renewable Fuel Standard and threaten industry ability to satisfy advanced biofuel mandates established by the Environmental Protection Agency every year.

The cash deposits required on biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia will generate a surge in domestic biodiesel prices that cannot be offset by a tax credit and which in turn will result in higher prices for diesel fuel. When this occurs, it will cost more to ship products across the country, which will result in higher prices for consumer goods moved by truck.



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Mars city living: Designing for the Red Planet

How will people live on Mars? An MIT team developed a design concept addressing this question as part of Mars City Design 2017, an international competition focused on sustainable cities on Mars to be built in the next century.

MIT’s winning urban design, titled Redwood Forest, creates domes or tree habitats that can each house up to 50 people. The domes provide open, public spaces containing plants and abundant water, which would be harvested from the northern plains of Mars. The tree habitats sit atop a network of underground tunnels, or roots, providing access to private spaces and easy, shirt-sleeve transportation to the other tree habitants in the community of 10,000. In addition to connectivity, the roots offer residents protection from cosmic radiation, micrometeorite impacts, and extreme thermal variations.

MIT postdoc Valentina Sumini and Assistant Professor Caitlin Mueller, who teaches in both departments of Architecture and Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), led the interdisciplinary team effort, which included nine MIT students from different departments and research groups.

Sumini describes the project’s design fundamentals and forest metaphor: “On Mars, our city will physically and functionally mimic a forest, using local Martian resources such as ice and water, regolith (or soil), and sun to support life. Designing a forest also symbolizes the potential for outward growth as nature spreads across the Martian landscape. Each tree habitat incorporates a branching structural system and an inflated membrane enclosure, anchored by tunneling roots. The design of a habitat can be generated using a computational form-finding and structural optimization workflow developed by the team. The design workflow is parametric, which means that each habitat is unique and contributes to a diverse forest of urban spaces.”

The team aims to build a comfortable environment for inhabitants while using location and system architecture focused on sustainability, a critical component for any Mars community.

Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics doctoral student George Lordos MBA '00, who was responsible for the system architecture of Redwood Forest, pointed out the central role of water in building vibrant communities on Mars:

“Every tree habitat in Redwood Forest will collect energy from the sun and use it to process and transport the water throughout the tree, and every tree is designed as a water-rich environment,” says Lordos. “Water fills the soft cells inside the dome providing protection from radiation, helps manage heat loads, and supplies hydroponic farms for growing fish and greens. Solar panels produce energy to split the stored water for the production of rocket fuel, oxygen, and for charging hydrogen fuel cells, which are necessary to power long-range vehicles as well as provide backup energy storage in case of dust storms.”

Many of the features of the design could be also useful on Earth, the designers say. Electric vehicles traveling in underground multi-level networks could help ease congested American cities. The tree habitat design could create living and working spaces in harsh environments, such as high latitudes, deserts and the sea floor. Hydroponic gardening beneath cities could provide fresh fish, fruits, and vegetables with lower land and transportation costs.

The MIT team also includes AeroAstro PhD students Samuel Wald, Matthew Moraguez, and Alejandro Trujillo; architecture PhD student Alpha Arsano SM '17 and research fellow Kam-Ming Mark Tam MEng '15; integrated design and management program graduate students Meghan Maupin and John Stillman; and civil and environmental engineering undergraduate student Zoe Lallas.



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Thermostat Wars!

When the heating season comes about, a lot of households and offices with mixed gender staff experience the so-called thermostat wars. But why does it happen? Can you do anything to stop it? And most importantly, is it bad for your heating system?

Setting up a thermostat

At the start of the heating season, no matter if you have a thermostat war raging, you need to perform a maintenance. This way, you can be sure that your heating equipment won’t fail you in the peak of the season. You can learn more about that here http://ift.tt/2ik0Bvt.

What’s the Deal?

To boil it down to the basics, men typically prefer colder temperatures than women when it comes to comfort.…



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Pros and Cons of Being a Landlord

Being a landlord is a great way to earn more income on the side. It also comes with its own set of challenges, from problem tenants to maintenance costs. Below are the pros and cons of being a landlord so you can decide if it’s the right job for you.

Landlord

Pros

Extra Income

One of the biggest appeals of becoming a landlord is the extra income. As long as you have reliable tenants in your property, you can count on a steady cash flow each month. The monthly payment should be enough to cover the mortgage of the property so you can hold on to the property as it appreciates in value.…



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The Power of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce

The Power of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce

If you have an ecommerce business, you might want to consider utilizing influencer marketing to increase brand awareness and advocacy. In fact, experts believe that influencer marketing is the next big trend within the ecommerce marketing space.

Small Business Trends recently caught up with Katie Manley, Rhiona Sullivan and Courtney Sneed of Pepperjam at Influencer Marketing Days in New York City’s Times Square. Pepperjam is a performance marketing agency that provides resources and services for influencers and affiliates and the brands that work with them.

During the conversation, the team shared some thoughts on influencer marketing and how it specifically relates to ecommerce businesses.

The Importance of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce

Currently, influencers mainly impact the buying process early on, usually during the discovery or brand awareness part of the sales cycle. But even though influencers might not be actually closing tons of sales, creating that awareness and building brand advocates can be a huge part of the marketing process for ecommerce businesses.

Manley said of influencer marketing, “It’s important because it is a huge piece of your ecommerce. It’s a really great way to build brand equity and brand advocacy.”

Since that’s all part of the beginning of the buying cycle, measuring results of influencer campaigns for ecommerce has been more difficult than other strategies like affiliate marketing.

But that all could soon change. The team at Pepperjam is working on a new tech offering that could make it easier for influencers and brands to measure results even when working with influencers that have more of an impact early in the buying process. Even though measuring the impact of affiliates has traditionally been a lot easier, Pepperjam believes that the newer concept of influencer marketing is poised to have a major impact on ecommerce businesses going forward.

Manley said, “That is going to be the sweet spot moving forward for ecommerce.”

This article, "The Power of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

The Power of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce

The Power of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce

If you have an ecommerce business, you might want to consider utilizing influencer marketing to increase brand awareness and advocacy. In fact, experts believe that influencer marketing is the next big trend within the ecommerce marketing space.

Small Business Trends recently caught up with Katie Manley, Rhiona Sullivan and Courtney Sneed of Pepperjam at Influencer Marketing Days in New York City’s Times Square. Pepperjam is a performance marketing agency that provides resources and services for influencers and affiliates and the brands that work with them.

During the conversation, the team shared some thoughts on influencer marketing and how it specifically relates to ecommerce businesses.

The Importance of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce

Currently, influencers mainly impact the buying process early on, usually during the discovery or brand awareness part of the sales cycle. But even though influencers might not be actually closing tons of sales, creating that awareness and building brand advocates can be a huge part of the marketing process for ecommerce businesses.

Manley said of influencer marketing, “It’s important because it is a huge piece of your ecommerce. It’s a really great way to build brand equity and brand advocacy.”

Since that’s all part of the beginning of the buying cycle, measuring results of influencer campaigns for ecommerce has been more difficult than other strategies like affiliate marketing.

But that all could soon change. The team at Pepperjam is working on a new tech offering that could make it easier for influencers and brands to measure results even when working with influencers that have more of an impact early in the buying process. Even though measuring the impact of affiliates has traditionally been a lot easier, Pepperjam believes that the newer concept of influencer marketing is poised to have a major impact on ecommerce businesses going forward.

Manley said, “That is going to be the sweet spot moving forward for ecommerce.”

This article, "The Power of Influencer Marketing in Ecommerce" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Why Entrepreneurs Need to Invest in a Second Passport

Ambitious entrepreneurs will always aspire to break into the global market. However, doing so requires the ability to travel overseas frequently. Getting a visa may seem like the most obvious solution, but applying for a visa can be a long and complex process. For an increasing number of wealthy individuals, obtaining a second passport is a more efficient alternative.

Second passport

Citizenship by investment is a legal process where individuals can obtain citizenship in a country, provided they invest a significant amount of money in government-approved projects designed to help develop that country’s economy. These programmes exist all over the world and provide a welcome boost to economies in small countries such as Cyprus and Dominica.…



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19 Mistakes to Avoid on Your Ecommerce Site Before It Goes Live (INFOGRAPHIC)

19 Ecommerce Website Mistakes to Avoid Before Going Live

So you built an ecommerce site and think it’s now ready. But is it really good to go live?

Several businesses have ecommerce websites these days, but not all succeed in increasing their page views and maximizing conversions. To launch a successful ecommerce site, you must know which mistakes you should avoid.

Discount coupon company Bluehost Coupon Codes has created a checklist of common mistakes businesses make when they launch their ecommerce sites.

Ecommerce Website Mistakes to Avoid Before Going Live

Let’s take a look at a few glaring mistakes you must avoid.

No Proper About Us Page

Potential customers want to know who you are before they start doing business with you. That’s why, most of them will check your About Us page for information. The absence of a good About Us page can affect website traffic and impact your sales.

Not Focusing on the SEO Strategy

You may invest a fortune on creating a sleek ecommerce website, but you won’t be able to reap the results unless you have a solid SEO strategy.

In today’s increasingly competitive marketplace, SEO is crucial to ensure you rank on the top pages of the search engines. A top ranking will get you more traffic and translate it into sales.

Not Taking Content Marketing Seriously

Good content is the reason why customers keep coming back to a site. For an ecommerce site, relevant and updated content is essential to keep customers interested. Remember, the information should provide real value to your target audience.

Not Making Your Website Responsive in Design

The number of mobile users is growing at a steady pace. And for ecommerce site owners, majority of traffic comes from mobile devices. A responsive web design ensures users get the same great experience when they are browsing your site on their mobile phones.

Loading Speed

Slow sites lose customers who tend to never come back again. Fast loading speed, on the other hand, can improve user experience and help you boost traffic.

To see all 19 mistakes you’ll want to avoid before launching your company’s ecommerce website, check out the infographic below:

19 Ecommerce Website Mistakes to Avoid Before Going Live

Image: Bluehost Coupon Codes

This article, "19 Mistakes to Avoid on Your Ecommerce Site Before It Goes Live (INFOGRAPHIC)" was first published on Small Business Trends



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