What is Mix and How Do I Use it for My Business?

What is Mix and How I Do I Use it?

On June 30, 2018, StumbleUpon is moving to Mix. And the new platform has a few features that might be of interest to small business owners and entrepreneurs. Similar to StumbleUpon, the social network site that helps users discover unique and interesting things across the web, Mix provides a new way to discover and save people’s favorite things on the internet.

What is Mix?

Mix is created and provided by the makers of StumbleUpon. Like StumbleUpon, Mix is part of the Expa family. Expa works with proven founders to develop and launch new companies. Expa was founded by Garret Camp, co-founder of Uber and StumbleUpon.

Built upon the legacy of StumbleUpon, Mix enables you to curate and share the best of the internet. The platform learns what you love browsing and searching for across the web, to show you even more of what you are interested in.

So entrepreneurs and small business owners can use this site either as a research tool to learn more about their industry and passions, as a networking tool to connect with partners and customers who share their interests or as another way of sharing their content with a specific target audience.

From articles and images to videos and music, you can save anything from anywhere on Mix. As long as it’s on the internet, you can add your favorite things to Mix.

The social media platform enables you to delve deeper into new topics and explore interests with greater comprehension. Rather than being merely a source for breaking news, Mix is aimed at taking its users deeper into the things that interest and matter to them, helping them learn more about their favorite topics and discover new and interesting things.

On this interactive and engaging online discovery site, you can share what you find with other users who have similar interests.

How Do You Use Mix?

You need to set up an account with Mix to be able to start using the site. You can set up a Mix profile with a StumbleUpon, Facebook, Twitter or Google account. When setting up on Mix, you’ll need to tell the site what you are passionate about surfing on the internet, in order for Mix to provide you with the news, information and recommendations you’re interested in.

The different categories of interest include cooking, technology, popular culture, travel, space, healthy living, nature, history, lifehacks, the environment, activism, art, outdoors, fashion and much, much more. Based on your selections, Mix then provides you with relevant stories and information from around the web to enlighten you about your passions.

You can create your own profile on Mix, including a bio and image. From your profile, you can post content and share it across the Mix platform, as well as onto other social media sites, including Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest. You can also email posts on Mix to chosen recipients.

Like other social media platforms, Mix is centered on interacting with other users by following people with shared interests and passions and growing your own list of followers.

It is important to note that Mix should not be confused with Mixx. Similar to Mix, Mixx was a user-driven social media site that enabled users to find content based on their interests. Through articles, images and videos, Mixx allowed users to search, discover and share media relevant to their interests and interact with other users. In 2011, Mixx became Chime.in, which has since terminated its services.

The new company Mix.com is built on content discovery. Garret Camp, Expa’s CEO, spoke of the ethos of this new content exploration site.

“Mix’s mission is to connect the curious with the creative, delivering personalized recommendations one click at a time. Mix will provide a modern and elegant way to discover the best content like by friends and experts, from across the web to your mobile device.”

Have you registered yet on Mix.com? We’d love to here what you think about the site.

Image: StumbleUpon

This article, "What is Mix and How Do I Use it for My Business?" was first published on Small Business Trends



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What is Mix and How Do I Use it for My Business?

What is Mix and How I Do I Use it?

On June 30, 2018, StumbleUpon is moving to Mix. And the new platform has a few features that might be of interest to small business owners and entrepreneurs. Similar to StumbleUpon, the social network site that helps users discover unique and interesting things across the web, Mix provides a new way to discover and save people’s favorite things on the internet.

What is Mix?

Mix is created and provided by the makers of StumbleUpon. Like StumbleUpon, Mix is part of the Expa family. Expa works with proven founders to develop and launch new companies. Expa was founded by Garret Camp, co-founder of Uber and StumbleUpon.

Built upon the legacy of StumbleUpon, Mix enables you to curate and share the best of the internet. The platform learns what you love browsing and searching for across the web, to show you even more of what you are interested in.

So entrepreneurs and small business owners can use this site either as a research tool to learn more about their industry and passions, as a networking tool to connect with partners and customers who share their interests or as another way of sharing their content with a specific target audience.

From articles and images to videos and music, you can save anything from anywhere on Mix. As long as it’s on the internet, you can add your favorite things to Mix.

The social media platform enables you to delve deeper into new topics and explore interests with greater comprehension. Rather than being merely a source for breaking news, Mix is aimed at taking its users deeper into the things that interest and matter to them, helping them learn more about their favorite topics and discover new and interesting things.

On this interactive and engaging online discovery site, you can share what you find with other users who have similar interests.

How Do You Use Mix?

You need to set up an account with Mix to be able to start using the site. You can set up a Mix profile with a StumbleUpon, Facebook, Twitter or Google account. When setting up on Mix, you’ll need to tell the site what you are passionate about surfing on the internet, in order for Mix to provide you with the news, information and recommendations you’re interested in.

The different categories of interest include cooking, technology, popular culture, travel, space, healthy living, nature, history, lifehacks, the environment, activism, art, outdoors, fashion and much, much more. Based on your selections, Mix then provides you with relevant stories and information from around the web to enlighten you about your passions.

You can create your own profile on Mix, including a bio and image. From your profile, you can post content and share it across the Mix platform, as well as onto other social media sites, including Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest. You can also email posts on Mix to chosen recipients.

Like other social media platforms, Mix is centered on interacting with other users by following people with shared interests and passions and growing your own list of followers.

It is important to note that Mix should not be confused with Mixx. Similar to Mix, Mixx was a user-driven social media site that enabled users to find content based on their interests. Through articles, images and videos, Mixx allowed users to search, discover and share media relevant to their interests and interact with other users. In 2011, Mixx became Chime.in, which has since terminated its services.

The new company Mix.com is built on content discovery. Garret Camp, Expa’s CEO, spoke of the ethos of this new content exploration site.

“Mix’s mission is to connect the curious with the creative, delivering personalized recommendations one click at a time. Mix will provide a modern and elegant way to discover the best content like by friends and experts, from across the web to your mobile device.”

Have you registered yet on Mix.com? We’d love to here what you think about the site.

Image: StumbleUpon

This article, "What is Mix and How Do I Use it for My Business?" was first published on Small Business Trends



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NHTSA Sends 2022-2025 CAFÉ Standards to OMB

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on May 30 sent its proposed Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFÉ) standards for model year 2022-2025 cars and light trucks to the White House Office of Management and Budget for review.

Information about the proposal is not yet available. However the agency had been considering eight possible CAFÉ standards. A draft proposal in April sought to freeze the standards for those years and prevent California from enforcing higher greenhouse gas standards. Current targets call for 2021 models to average 41 miles per gallon and 2025 models to average 49.7 miles per gallon.

Any changes to the CAFÉ standards are likely to be challenged in court.

DOT’s decision to revisit the CAFÉ standards marks yet another move by the Trump Administration to roll back environmental policies established by the Obama Administration.

The Trump Administration on May 29 also repealed a rule that required recipients of federal transportation dollars -- mostly states, cities, and metropolitan planning areas -- to measure greenhouse gas emissions when planning transportation projects. That rule change removes the obligation to measure greenhouse gas emissions from fuel use by vehicles that would be associated with new transportation projects.



via Business Feeds

American tech giants are making life tough for startups

IT IS a classic startup story, but with a twist. Three 20-somethings launched a firm out of a dorm room at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2016, with the goal of using algorithms to predict the reply to an e-mail. In May they were fundraising for their startup, EasyEmail, when Google held its annual conference for software developers and announced a tool similar to EasyEmail’s. Filip Twarowski, its boss, sees Google’s incursion as “incredible confirmation” they are working on something worthwhile. But he also admits that it came as “a little bit of a shock”. The giant has scared off at least one prospective backer of EasyEmail, because venture capitalists try to dodge spaces where the tech giants might step.

The behemoths’ annual conferences, held to announce new tools, features, and acquisitions, always “send shock waves of fear through entrepreneurs”, says Mike Driscoll, a partner at Data Collective, an investment firm. “Venture capitalists attend to see which of...



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Are you stuck in a “bullshit job”?

SISYPHUS, king of Corinth, was condemned for all eternity to push a boulder up a hill, only to watch it roll down again. David Graeber, an anthropologist, thinks that many modern workers face the same fate today, forced to perform pointless tasks, or “bullshit jobs”, as his new book* calls them.

Mr Graeber defines a bullshit job as one “that is so completely pointless, unnecessary or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence”, though they may have to pretend that they believe in it. This definition, and indeed much of the book, combines two categories of roles. In the first are jobs that Mr Graeber tends to think are socially worthless, such as corporate lawyers or investment bankers. (Some of those workers may take an equally dim view of the utility of anthropologists.) In the second group are jobs where employees find themselves with little or nothing to do and, worse, must still look as if they are frantically busy.

What is his evidence? The...



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Shootings in India tarnish Vedanta’s reputation

AFTER 99 peaceful days of protests, the 100th brought carnage. On May 22nd in Tuticorin, a coastal town near the southern tip of India, police indiscriminately fired live rounds into a crowd of several thousand demonstrators who were opposing the planned expansion of a copper-smelting facility. Thirteen people died and scores more were injured. The fallout threatens to be a chronic headache both for the Indian authorities and Vedanta, the mining giant which owns the facility.

Corporate public-relations consultants in London, where Vedanta’s main holding company is based, have depressingly ample experience in helping commodities firms whose reputations risk being sullied by such police violence. Royal Dutch Shell, an oil group, still faces ire for the way Nigerian authorities arrested then executed Ken Saro-Wiwa, an activist, in 1995. Lonmin, a platinum-miner also listed in London, had to rebuff claims by South African police that it should carry some blame for cops shooting its striking workers...



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Six muddles about share buy-backs

THE last time a corporate-finance concept went mainstream was during the financial crisis, when banks’ capital became a subject you could raise in yoga studios or biker bars without being hushed or hospitalised. Now there is a new candidate: share buy-backs, which reached $189bn in the three months to March for firms in the S&P 500 index, a record high. They may rise even further when a wave of cash comes home in response to America’s new tax rules, which encourage firms to repatriate the $1trn of funds they have parked in foreign subsidiaries. Apple plans to spend $100bn on buy-backs, for example.

As the sums rise, so does the controversy. In a buy-back a firm acquires its own stock to return cash to its shareholders. To critics they are a financial voodoo that exacerbates inequality and depresses investment. Elizabeth Warren, a left-leaning senator, wants them partially banned. But among investors such hostility is seen as a “derangement syndrome”, to quote Cliff Asness, the boss of AQR,...



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Activist investors go after a German industrial icon

White heat of change

FEW industrial scenes offer the drama of a steelworks in full flow. Perched high in a cabin, a technician guides a bucket the size of a house to send 250 tons of lava-like molten metal into a vast crucible. As a roar echoes across a gargantuan hall, a pile of scrap slides into the mixture. Plumes of illuminated smoke rise. Sparks like giant fireflies tumble down. ThyssenKrupp’s steelmaking plant in Duisburg makes 30,000 tons of the metal daily.

The firm itself is going through an industrial drama, after years of ailing. Its boss, Heinrich Hiesinger, was seen as its saviour after arriving from Siemens late in 2010. But swiftness is not his forte: a colleague says he talks of “diligence before speed”. He did rid the firm of loss-making steel plants, such as assets in the Americas that cost €8bn ($9.3bn) in write-downs. Yet he has not reformed a top-heavy company.

Several bits of the group—a hotch-potch that includes submarine-, ship...



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A Hungarian startup could beat Ryanair at its own low-cost game

JUST a few hundred metres from Budapest airport’s runways, the wails of scorched airline passengers echo around an industrial estate. But no real people are being harmed. Here Wizz Air, a rapidly growing Hungarian carrier, trains cabin crew and pilots in evacuating its planes safely. Last year the airline recruited 1,000 new staff, twice as many as the year before. In February construction work started on a bigger training centre to teach an extra 1,400 cabin crew it will need next year.

If anyone will be burned by this expansion it will be Europe’s cheapest airline, Ryanair. Over the past two decades its chief executive, Michael O’Leary, turned the Irish minnow into Europe’s biggest carrier by copying the low-cost model of Southwest, an American budget airline. It has long had no-frills rivals such as easyJet and Norwegian. But these two have never been able to match Ryanair’s low cost base. Yet after Wizz’s full-year results on May 24th, in which it reported record profits,...



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HEYTEA wants to make tea-drinking cool again in China

TIPPED, not stirred, is how hip young things in China now take their tea. To be exact, at a 45-degree tilt. So advise the tea-ristas of HEYTEA, a budding, pricey tea chain, the better to blend the bitter tang of freshly brewed leaves with a salty cream-cheese “cap”. Naigai cha, or cheese-tea, has taken China’s rich eastern cities by storm. For months after HEYTEA shops appeared in Shanghai in February 2017, security guards had to manage queues with waiting times of up to three hours. Impatient customers hired queuers from personal-services apps to stand in line for them. Cups were limited to two purchases a person to ward off scalpers (the limit is still in place in Beijing).

To many in the beverage industry this smacked of “thirst marketing”, purposely keeping supply scarce. HEYTEA denies this, as well as accusations of padding out its own queues. Though everything from fancy eateries to convenience stores is on China’s main food-delivery apps, HEYTEA stayed off them...



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Comcast and Disney battle over Rupert Murdoch’s empire

A YEAR ago, investors in 21st Century Fox, Rupert Murdoch’s entertainment empire, could have been forgiven a bout of the blues. Shares were down by 30% from their peak in December 2014. Viewership of most of the company’s American networks was in decline, and millions had dropped expensive pay-TV packages, including its own, in favour of cheaper web-delivered video.

On May 25th Fox’s shares reached a new all-time high, rising above $39 a share. The business has not turned around, but Fox’s value has, as a prize for other media titans seeking global scale. Comcast, a cable giant, is preparing to top Disney’s $52bn all-stock offer for much of Fox (plus almost $15bn in debt) with an all-cash offer of at least $60bn. Disney is reportedly readying cash to sweeten its offer, which Fox’s board had approved in December. The final sale price could exceed $70bn. The winner will take on Netflix and Amazon in the competition for customers globally. The loser will be at risk of falling behind in...



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The number of new banks in America has fallen off a cliff

THE single-storey main branch of the Texas Hill Country Bank, in Kerrville, sits at the back of a tired shopping centre, in the shade of a six-storey Wells Fargo building. When Roy Thompson, the chief executive, was hired (from Wells) in 2012, three years after it opened, he ran a radio ad campaign to alert locals to its existence. It asked listeners to help a mother (his) to find her child (Roy himself), who had gone missing after joining a community bank.

If Mr Thompson had shared the fate of many small-town bankers, he would have remained missing. Since 2012 more than 2,000 American banks have closed (see chart). Almost all were small, operating in the shadows of big banks with big budgets for marketing, technology and regulatory compliance. For the same reasons, almost no new banks have opened. Before the crisis the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) approved hundreds of bank charters each year. Since 2009 there have been only a dozen in total.

So sudden has been the stop that the FDIC is...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

In investing, as in poker, following rules works best

AT THE annual World Series of Poker, which begins this week in Las Vegas, the main event is the no-limit Texas hold ’em tournament. In the course of two weeks of gruelling knock-out play, several thousand players are whittled down to just two, playing “heads-up” for one of the WSOP’s coveted bracelets.

In last year’s final hand, both players had pushed all their chips in, with five shared cards yet to be dealt. Scott Blumstein, who held Ace-Deuce, was a big underdog against Daniel Ott, who held Ace-Eight. With one card to come, Mr Blumstein’s hand had not improved. His chances had narrowed to 7%. Of the remaining 44 cards, only one of the other three deuces could give him victory.

The cards—and thus the odds of winning or losing—were known to both players, because they had already committed all their chips. Poker is not usually like this. Winning depends not only on your cards but on the unseen cards held by other players, on your ability to deceive them by your...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

There is madness, but perhaps also method, in America’s trade policies

DIVINING meaning in the Trump administration’s trade announcements is a thankless task. No sooner does a policy seem settled than it is thrown up in the air once more. On May 23rd, days before a scheduled meeting with the European Union and Japan on a joint trade strategy and in the middle of talks to revamp the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), it began an investigation into whether car imports are a threat to America’s national security. On May 29th, days after tariffs on imports from China were supposedly put on hold, official word came that tariffs on $50bn of Chinese imports would be imposed “shortly” after June 15th. Barring a last-minute change of heart—which would not be the first—as The Economist went to press the administration was expected to announce tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from the EU from June 1st. Whether America’s partners in NAFTA, Canada and Mexico, would also be hit was unclear.

The chaos is partly the consequence...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Turkey’s central bank has streamlined its fight against inflation

THE baroque era in Turkish architecture lasted deep into the 19th century, leaving behind lavish buildings, such as the Lily Mosque in Istanbul and waterside pavilions that seem to float on the Bosphorus. The baroque period in Turkish monetary policy will last until June 1st, when the central bank will simplify its equally ornate monetary-policy framework. It will henceforth rely on a single interest rate (the one-week repo rate), which it will raise to 16.5%. This will supersede a jumble of interest rates (see chart) that has left the Turkish currency perilously close to submersion.

Turkish baroque mingled Western...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

If wages are to rise, workers need more bargaining power

“IT’S just not going to happen,” said Troy Taylor, the boss of a Coca Cola bottling company, when asked at a recent Federal Reserve event whether he foresaw broad-based wage gains. His remarks (unlike the fizzy drinks he sells) were unsweetened. But experience suggests he may have a point. In most rich countries, real pay has grown by at most 1% per year, on average, since 2000. For low-wage workers the stagnation has been more severe and prolonged: between 1979 and 2016, pay adjusted for inflation for the bottom fifth of American earners barely rose at all. Politicians are scrambling for scapegoats and solutions. But addressing stagnant wages requires a better understanding of the relationship between pay, productivity and power.

In the simplest economic models, productivity is almost all that matters. Workers are paid exactly and precisely in accordance with their contribution to a firm’s output. Were they paid less, rival employers could profit by luring them away with higher pay, and wages...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Rwanda refuses to remove tariffs on imports of used clothing

Glad rags to sad rags

IN A market in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital, a cacophonous auction is under way. Sellers hold crumpled T-shirts and faded jeans aloft; traders shout and jostle for the best picks. Everything is second-hand. A Tommy Hilfiger shirt goes for 5,000 Rwandan francs ($5.82); a plain one for a tenth of that. Afterwards, a trader sorts through the purchases he will resell in his home village. The logos hint at their previous lives: Kent State University, a rotary club in Pennsylvania, Number One Dad.

These auctions were once twice as busy, says Félicité Mukarurangwa, a trader. But in 2016 Rwanda’s government hiked import duties on a kilo of used clothes from $0.20 to $2.50. Now she struggles to break even. The traders are not the only ones who are unhappy. Exporters in America claim the tariffs are costing jobs there. In March President Donald Trump warned that he would suspend Rwanda’s duty-free access to American markets for its apparel after 60 days if it...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

10 Gelato and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

In 2016, gelato accounted for approximately 5% of the $14.3 billion U.S. ice cream market. So, opening a gelato and shaved ice business can prove lucrative for entrepreneurs.

Still, like any business, starting from scratch can be challenging, particularly when it comes to competing with large gelato chains. One option is to become a gelato and shaved ice franchisee and open a store with an established brand.

Gelato and ice cream franchises have experienced massive growth over past five years leading up to 2017, according to one published report.

Starting from a humble porch in Philly Rita’s Italian Ice went on to become an international phenomenon with more than 600 locations across the U.S. and around the world. The brand remains a testament to the huge demand for gelato and shaved ice and the potential success of franchising within this industry.

Gelato Franchises to Consider

Of course you could always choose from a number of other franchises besides Rita’s when seeking a successful gelato or shaved ice opportunity with an established brand.

Gelato Go

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

An established gelateria brand throughout America, Gelato Go, offers franchising opportunities for proactive and determined entrepreneurs looking for a share of the profitable gelato market. A total investment of $183,500 to $400,100 is required to open a Gelato Go store. And franchisees will receive comprehensive training.

Papalani Gelato

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Papalani Gelato serves gelato, frozen yoghurt, sorbetto and many more iced goodies across the U.S. The company offers franchise opportunities in the U.S., encouraging people to start their own fun and rewarding business. Depending on where you open a Papalani Gelato business, the costs can range from $152,475 to $478,550.

Amorino

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Amorino provides Italian gelato available in a whole host of flavors, with customers being able to create their own Amorino rose gelato. Amorino gelaterias are available to franchise across America. The company looks for impassioned self-starters who are keen to contribute to the success of Amorino. Details about franchise costs are available upon application.

Shaved Ice Franchises to Consider

Mustache Mike’s Italian Ice

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Mustache Mike’s Italian Ice manufactures Italian ice in California and then distributes it throughout the U.S. This popular Italian ice brand offers franchise opportunities the company describes as simple, flexible and providing excellent profit margins. The company doesn’t charge franchise fees and as the products are non-dairy, there are no health department issues.

Kona Ice

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Kona Ice is another shaved ice opportunity in the U.S., with more than 800 shaved ice truck franchises across the country. An investment of $110,750, includes a franchise fee, inventory pack and truck.  The company seeks a strong, personal commitment and an active involvement in opening the business in order to become a Kona Ice truck franchisee.

Bahama Buck’s

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Bahama Buck’s offers opportunities to run a shaved ice and tropical dessert shop for entrepreneurs wanting to surround themselves with fresh ingredients and innovative products. Bahama Buck’s says its franchising system is a proven ‘Plan to Win’, with support given by a team of professionals with experience in developing people and products. The initial cost for a Bahama Buck’s franchise ranges from $233,326 to $770,532.

Hokulia Shave Ice

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

If you fancy putting your flipflops on and working at the beach each day, then why not open a Hokulia Shave Ice store in a sunny location. Hokulia is one of the nation’s premier shaved ice and tropical dessert franchises. Franchisees need to make an initial investment of $81,500 to $133,500 covering start-up costs, equipment, inventory, payroll and ongoing support.

Tikiz

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Another shaved ice truck franchise, Tikiz, has been offering opportunities for entrepreneurs to start their own businesses since 2012. With a financial investment of between $132,000 and $144,000, you too could be selling shaved ice and other frozen products from a Tikiz truck, which comes with a top-of-the-line high output ice shaver.

Wanna Chill?

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

From shaved ice to frozen yoghurt, smoothies to acai bowls, Wanna Chill? offers another growing shaved ice brand. The company offers three franchising options: a cart you can tow, a food truck, or a Wanna Chill? store. Investment requirements vary depending on which of these three franchise options you choose, ranging from a $51,000 initial investment to around $186,000.

Ohana Bros

Inspired by the world travels of the Ohano Bros Surfer Dudes, Ohano Bros stores specialize in Hawaiian shave ice and a variety of other products. For an investment ranging from $192,670 to $368,070, entrepreneurs with enthusiasm to sell shaved ice can grab themselves an Ohana Bros franchise business.

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "10 Gelato and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

10 Gelato and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

In 2016, gelato accounted for approximately 5% of the $14.3 billion U.S. ice cream market. So, opening a gelato and shaved ice business can prove lucrative for entrepreneurs.

Still, like any business, starting from scratch can be challenging, particularly when it comes to competing with large gelato chains. One option is to become a gelato and shaved ice franchisee and open a store with an established brand.

Gelato and ice cream franchises have experienced massive growth over past five years leading up to 2017, according to one published report.

Starting from a humble porch in Philly Rita’s Italian Ice went on to become an international phenomenon with more than 600 locations across the U.S. and around the world. The brand remains a testament to the huge demand for gelato and shaved ice and the potential success of franchising within this industry.

Gelato Franchises to Consider

Of course you could always choose from a number of other franchises besides Rita’s when seeking a successful gelato or shaved ice opportunity with an established brand.

Gelato Go

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

An established gelateria brand throughout America, Gelato Go, offers franchising opportunities for proactive and determined entrepreneurs looking for a share of the profitable gelato market. A total investment of $183,500 to $400,100 is required to open a Gelato Go store. And franchisees will receive comprehensive training.

Papalani Gelato

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Papalani Gelato serves gelato, frozen yoghurt, sorbetto and many more iced goodies across the U.S. The company offers franchise opportunities in the U.S., encouraging people to start their own fun and rewarding business. Depending on where you open a Papalani Gelato business, the costs can range from $152,475 to $478,550.

Amorino

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Amorino provides Italian gelato available in a whole host of flavors, with customers being able to create their own Amorino rose gelato. Amorino gelaterias are available to franchise across America. The company looks for impassioned self-starters who are keen to contribute to the success of Amorino. Details about franchise costs are available upon application.

Shaved Ice Franchises to Consider

Mustache Mike’s Italian Ice

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Mustache Mike’s Italian Ice manufactures Italian ice in California and then distributes it throughout the U.S. This popular Italian ice brand offers franchise opportunities the company describes as simple, flexible and providing excellent profit margins. The company doesn’t charge franchise fees and as the products are non-dairy, there are no health department issues.

Kona Ice

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Kona Ice is another shaved ice opportunity in the U.S., with more than 800 shaved ice truck franchises across the country. An investment of $110,750, includes a franchise fee, inventory pack and truck.  The company seeks a strong, personal commitment and an active involvement in opening the business in order to become a Kona Ice truck franchisee.

Bahama Buck’s

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Bahama Buck’s offers opportunities to run a shaved ice and tropical dessert shop for entrepreneurs wanting to surround themselves with fresh ingredients and innovative products. Bahama Buck’s says its franchising system is a proven ‘Plan to Win’, with support given by a team of professionals with experience in developing people and products. The initial cost for a Bahama Buck’s franchise ranges from $233,326 to $770,532.

Hokulia Shave Ice

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

If you fancy putting your flipflops on and working at the beach each day, then why not open a Hokulia Shave Ice store in a sunny location. Hokulia is one of the nation’s premier shaved ice and tropical dessert franchises. Franchisees need to make an initial investment of $81,500 to $133,500 covering start-up costs, equipment, inventory, payroll and ongoing support.

Tikiz

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

Another shaved ice truck franchise, Tikiz, has been offering opportunities for entrepreneurs to start their own businesses since 2012. With a financial investment of between $132,000 and $144,000, you too could be selling shaved ice and other frozen products from a Tikiz truck, which comes with a top-of-the-line high output ice shaver.

Wanna Chill?

10 Gelato Franchises and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s

From shaved ice to frozen yoghurt, smoothies to acai bowls, Wanna Chill? offers another growing shaved ice brand. The company offers three franchising options: a cart you can tow, a food truck, or a Wanna Chill? store. Investment requirements vary depending on which of these three franchise options you choose, ranging from a $51,000 initial investment to around $186,000.

Ohana Bros

Inspired by the world travels of the Ohano Bros Surfer Dudes, Ohano Bros stores specialize in Hawaiian shave ice and a variety of other products. For an investment ranging from $192,670 to $368,070, entrepreneurs with enthusiasm to sell shaved ice can grab themselves an Ohana Bros franchise business.

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This article, "10 Gelato and Shaved Ice Franchises to Compete with Rita’s" was first published on Small Business Trends



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A Guide to Boston Startups

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The Boston Startup Scene

Boston recently ranked first among the top 25 startup hubs in America. Discover some of the elements that make Boston an ideal place for entrepreneurs.

In the past, Boston has been an underestimated player in the startup scene. However, it recently ranked first among the top 25 startup hubs in America, according to a report by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation and startup incubator 1776. The findings are based on talent, specialization, capital, density, connectivity, and cultural statistics, among other data. “Boston earned the top spot by having clear emphasis on next generation tech companies specializing in education, energy and healthcare industries,” according to the Boston Business Journal.

Not only is the city of Boston a startup hub, next-door neighbor Cambridge is thriving, thanks in part to the plethora of world-class universities located nearby. Facebook and Microsoft are just two of the most famous examples to come from the intellectual capital of the United States. That’s one of the reasons tech leaders are taking notice of the area’s impressive growth. Companies like Amazon and Twitter have opened headquarters on the East Coast or established offices in Boston.

The Boston Startup Scene

The Boston Startup Scene

In addition to high quality of life ratings and a welcoming regulatory environment for startups, Boston has a lot to offer. Because of critical factors like a collaborative community and innovative business concepts, its growth as a startup hub is expected to continue. There are many elements that make Boston an ideal place for entrepreneurs and startups. Here are just a few:

Access to Venture Capital

For companies looking for access to startup funds, the city is ideal. Boston has topped the charts alongside California for the most venture capital per capita invested in the U.S.,” according to the Startup Institute. This figure increased 37 percent in 2014, as Massachusetts companies raised $4.2 billion in venture capital funding.

Its status as a startup hub makes Boston highly attractive to investors. Numerous “super-angels and angel groups” have institutionalized, creating a broader set of seed-stage funds, according to investment capital firm NextView Ventures. “A handful of industry-focused funds have also burst onto the scene. These promise to add significant expertise and capital,” NextView Ventures says.

Spirit of Innovation

Boston’s tech giants, top-tier universities, and medical centers are constantly driving new developments in technology, energy, culture, politics, education, health care, and more. Boston’s startup culture makes it a hotbed for growth and new ideas. Even companies in the early stages are growing fast, hiring larger staffs, and boosting the local economy.

A collaborative approach to entrepreneurship means that more established enterprises continue to drive innovation, working with local talent and smaller startups to create what The Next Web calls “a tech mecca.” Top-tier universities also contribute to the area’s startup culture with new ideas and the latest research.

The Boston Startup Scene

An Ecosystem of Support

There are more than 40 university and industry incubators and accelerators throughout the state of Massachusetts, The Next Web points out. This means that entrepreneurs have access to the resources they need for success.

Local government is playing an important role as well: “City Hall has built programs that support startups to help Boston evolve into a world-class tech ecosystem, including the hiring of the first ‘Startup Czar,’ an advocate for the city’s entrepreneurs and early-stage businesses,” The Next Web continues.

Boston also offers other resources. Professional services like legal, public relations, and finance abound, so Boston startups have access to the support they need. In addition, companies like Techstars BostonMassChallenge, and Startup Institute Boston provide guidance and other resources to first-time founders and entrepreneurs. These programs provide selected early-stage ventures with office space, capital, mentorship, peers, industry connections, investor introductions, and other support. In addition, Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC), founded in Cambridge’s Kendall Square, supports more than 1,000 companies in the startup community by providing infrastructure and co-working space. CIC has also expanded to include a Boston center.

The Boston Startup Scene

The Talent Pool

As home to more universities than any other city in the United States, Boston is full of well-educated young professionals — 39.2 percent of adults ages 18 to 34 in Boston have a bachelor’s degree. The city is also home to many of the top STEM schools in the country. This means that a large amount of tech research and development is taking place locally.

The talent pool feeds an impressive tech sector workforce as well. JLL’s 2015 Technology Office Outlook report found that Boston is second only to Silicon Valley. The Boston Redevelopment Authority Research Division’s Boston’s Economy report in 2015 also found that employment in high tech industries has grown 9 percent each year since 2010. Consequently, there is a wealth of both raw and seasoned talent to choose from in the area.

Women Are Major Players

Boston has a positive startup climate for women, with female-led startups in mobile, health care, finance, and other industries. Statewide, there was a 21.4 percent growth rate of women in tech between 2009 and 2013, putting Massachusetts second among competing tech states, The Next Web reports.

Twenty-nine percent of startup founders in the city are female — second only to Chicago, which has 30 percent female founders, according to the Global Startup Ecosystem Ranking report. For example, the CEOs of Boston startups like Baroo and Care.com are female, and more than 10 percent of companies “invested in by some top venture capital firms are women founded in Boston,” according to Alice Rossiter, founder of Alice’s Table. Considering the average is 3 percent, this statistic is indicative of the important role women play in the Boston startup culture.

The Boston Startup Scene

5 Boston Startups

The following are just a few of the many startups that call Boston home. Their industries range from fitness to utilities, but each business is focused on innovation and bringing new ideas to the marketplace.

  • Circle was founded in 2013 by Jeremy Allaire, who also helped create online video platform Brightcove. This venture aims to bring digital currency like bitcoin into mainstream commerce by “building products to make it easier for consumers and merchants to accept the currency,” according to Mashable.
  • Runkeeper is a fitness app that allows users to track their workouts. It was founded in 2009 and was cofounded by Michael Sheeley, who later began working with another area startup, Mobee.
  • Boundless was founded by Aaron White, Ariel Diaz, and Brian Balfour in 2011. Its goal is to help students save money by offering free online textbooks and “high-quality content from the Web,” Business Insider says.
  • WegoWise focuses on reducing energy and water usage by gathering utility information and sharing it with users. The company was founded in 2010 by Edward Connelly, DeWitt Jones, and Barun Singh. WegoWise aims to “make buildings more energy efficient and to simultaneously save customers money,” according to Planted, an online talent community.
  • Whole Heart Provisions is a vegan fast-casual restaurant founded in 2015 by chef Rebecca Arnold and restauranteur James DiSabatino. Whole Heart Provisions offers healthy food options in a quick-serve setting for an affordable price.

From examples like these, it’s clear that startups in Boston are thriving. The city offers “a passionate and talented workforce and an abundance of investors and government support—all the things that position this city as a high-tech force to be reckoned with,” The Next Web says.

The Path to Success

Lesley University’s online business degree programs are ideal for those looking to create innovative business ventures like the ones featured here. Lesley’s online BS in Business Management features a curriculum focused on management skills that prepare graduates for a variety of business careers.

Lesley also offers an online MS in Management degree. This program prepares graduates to become business leaders. It uses a multidimensional approach to leadership that helps students develop the skills for successful entrepreneurship.

Photo via Lesley University

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "A Guide to Boston Startups" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

A Guide to Boston Startups

Sponsored Post

The Boston Startup Scene

Boston recently ranked first among the top 25 startup hubs in America. Discover some of the elements that make Boston an ideal place for entrepreneurs.

In the past, Boston has been an underestimated player in the startup scene. However, it recently ranked first among the top 25 startup hubs in America, according to a report by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation and startup incubator 1776. The findings are based on talent, specialization, capital, density, connectivity, and cultural statistics, among other data. “Boston earned the top spot by having clear emphasis on next generation tech companies specializing in education, energy and healthcare industries,” according to the Boston Business Journal.

Not only is the city of Boston a startup hub, next-door neighbor Cambridge is thriving, thanks in part to the plethora of world-class universities located nearby. Facebook and Microsoft are just two of the most famous examples to come from the intellectual capital of the United States. That’s one of the reasons tech leaders are taking notice of the area’s impressive growth. Companies like Amazon and Twitter have opened headquarters on the East Coast or established offices in Boston.

The Boston Startup Scene

The Boston Startup Scene

In addition to high quality of life ratings and a welcoming regulatory environment for startups, Boston has a lot to offer. Because of critical factors like a collaborative community and innovative business concepts, its growth as a startup hub is expected to continue. There are many elements that make Boston an ideal place for entrepreneurs and startups. Here are just a few:

Access to Venture Capital

For companies looking for access to startup funds, the city is ideal. Boston has topped the charts alongside California for the most venture capital per capita invested in the U.S.,” according to the Startup Institute. This figure increased 37 percent in 2014, as Massachusetts companies raised $4.2 billion in venture capital funding.

Its status as a startup hub makes Boston highly attractive to investors. Numerous “super-angels and angel groups” have institutionalized, creating a broader set of seed-stage funds, according to investment capital firm NextView Ventures. “A handful of industry-focused funds have also burst onto the scene. These promise to add significant expertise and capital,” NextView Ventures says.

Spirit of Innovation

Boston’s tech giants, top-tier universities, and medical centers are constantly driving new developments in technology, energy, culture, politics, education, health care, and more. Boston’s startup culture makes it a hotbed for growth and new ideas. Even companies in the early stages are growing fast, hiring larger staffs, and boosting the local economy.

A collaborative approach to entrepreneurship means that more established enterprises continue to drive innovation, working with local talent and smaller startups to create what The Next Web calls “a tech mecca.” Top-tier universities also contribute to the area’s startup culture with new ideas and the latest research.

The Boston Startup Scene

An Ecosystem of Support

There are more than 40 university and industry incubators and accelerators throughout the state of Massachusetts, The Next Web points out. This means that entrepreneurs have access to the resources they need for success.

Local government is playing an important role as well: “City Hall has built programs that support startups to help Boston evolve into a world-class tech ecosystem, including the hiring of the first ‘Startup Czar,’ an advocate for the city’s entrepreneurs and early-stage businesses,” The Next Web continues.

Boston also offers other resources. Professional services like legal, public relations, and finance abound, so Boston startups have access to the support they need. In addition, companies like Techstars BostonMassChallenge, and Startup Institute Boston provide guidance and other resources to first-time founders and entrepreneurs. These programs provide selected early-stage ventures with office space, capital, mentorship, peers, industry connections, investor introductions, and other support. In addition, Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC), founded in Cambridge’s Kendall Square, supports more than 1,000 companies in the startup community by providing infrastructure and co-working space. CIC has also expanded to include a Boston center.

The Boston Startup Scene

The Talent Pool

As home to more universities than any other city in the United States, Boston is full of well-educated young professionals — 39.2 percent of adults ages 18 to 34 in Boston have a bachelor’s degree. The city is also home to many of the top STEM schools in the country. This means that a large amount of tech research and development is taking place locally.

The talent pool feeds an impressive tech sector workforce as well. JLL’s 2015 Technology Office Outlook report found that Boston is second only to Silicon Valley. The Boston Redevelopment Authority Research Division’s Boston’s Economy report in 2015 also found that employment in high tech industries has grown 9 percent each year since 2010. Consequently, there is a wealth of both raw and seasoned talent to choose from in the area.

Women Are Major Players

Boston has a positive startup climate for women, with female-led startups in mobile, health care, finance, and other industries. Statewide, there was a 21.4 percent growth rate of women in tech between 2009 and 2013, putting Massachusetts second among competing tech states, The Next Web reports.

Twenty-nine percent of startup founders in the city are female — second only to Chicago, which has 30 percent female founders, according to the Global Startup Ecosystem Ranking report. For example, the CEOs of Boston startups like Baroo and Care.com are female, and more than 10 percent of companies “invested in by some top venture capital firms are women founded in Boston,” according to Alice Rossiter, founder of Alice’s Table. Considering the average is 3 percent, this statistic is indicative of the important role women play in the Boston startup culture.

The Boston Startup Scene

5 Boston Startups

The following are just a few of the many startups that call Boston home. Their industries range from fitness to utilities, but each business is focused on innovation and bringing new ideas to the marketplace.

  • Circle was founded in 2013 by Jeremy Allaire, who also helped create online video platform Brightcove. This venture aims to bring digital currency like bitcoin into mainstream commerce by “building products to make it easier for consumers and merchants to accept the currency,” according to Mashable.
  • Runkeeper is a fitness app that allows users to track their workouts. It was founded in 2009 and was cofounded by Michael Sheeley, who later began working with another area startup, Mobee.
  • Boundless was founded by Aaron White, Ariel Diaz, and Brian Balfour in 2011. Its goal is to help students save money by offering free online textbooks and “high-quality content from the Web,” Business Insider says.
  • WegoWise focuses on reducing energy and water usage by gathering utility information and sharing it with users. The company was founded in 2010 by Edward Connelly, DeWitt Jones, and Barun Singh. WegoWise aims to “make buildings more energy efficient and to simultaneously save customers money,” according to Planted, an online talent community.
  • Whole Heart Provisions is a vegan fast-casual restaurant founded in 2015 by chef Rebecca Arnold and restauranteur James DiSabatino. Whole Heart Provisions offers healthy food options in a quick-serve setting for an affordable price.

From examples like these, it’s clear that startups in Boston are thriving. The city offers “a passionate and talented workforce and an abundance of investors and government support—all the things that position this city as a high-tech force to be reckoned with,” The Next Web says.

The Path to Success

Lesley University’s online business degree programs are ideal for those looking to create innovative business ventures like the ones featured here. Lesley’s online BS in Business Management features a curriculum focused on management skills that prepare graduates for a variety of business careers.

Lesley also offers an online MS in Management degree. This program prepares graduates to become business leaders. It uses a multidimensional approach to leadership that helps students develop the skills for successful entrepreneurship.

Photo via Lesley University

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "A Guide to Boston Startups" was first published on Small Business Trends



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