Attend This Free Online Event And Gain Insights from Seasoned Entrepreneurs

Work From Home Ideas: 12 In-Home Business Opportunities You Can Start From Your Laptop
Want to start a new business — or grow an existing one? Where do you go and who do you ask for help?

Both these questions will be answered with an online event coming your way this fall. And attendance is free!

At this year’s Growth & Success Conference, experts will discuss ways to build your brand; reset, reboot and redirect your success; gain confidence and clarity; and how you can learn to systematically carry out successful negotiations.

The event brings together a collection of seasoned entrepreneurs and thought leaders to share their knowledge, experience and insights as business owners, mentors and strategists with you!

You can attend the free conference from September 17 – 18, 2018 online as part of the Virtual Conference Series.

Click on the Growth & Success box below to register and attend:

Register for Free



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

Growth & Success ConGrowth & Success Con
September 17, 2018, Online

This small business virtual conference is dedicated to supporting entrepreneurs at all stages who are stuck in the daily grind of building their businesses and struggle to get solid advice and guidance. An amazing panel of experts in various disciplines and business coaches will share tips & tricks on topics including Growth, Marketing, Management & Business Building for Success. Register today!


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends.

You can see a full list of events, contest and award listings or post your own events by visiting the Small Business Events Calendar.

Image: Shutterstock

This article, "Attend This Free Online Event And Gain Insights from Seasoned Entrepreneurs" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Attend This Free Online Event And Gain Insights from Seasoned Entrepreneurs

Work From Home Ideas: 12 In-Home Business Opportunities You Can Start From Your Laptop
Want to start a new business — or grow an existing one? Where do you go and who do you ask for help?

Both these questions will be answered with an online event coming your way this fall. And attendance is free!

At this year’s Growth & Success Conference, experts will discuss ways to build your brand; reset, reboot and redirect your success; gain confidence and clarity; and how you can learn to systematically carry out successful negotiations.

The event brings together a collection of seasoned entrepreneurs and thought leaders to share their knowledge, experience and insights as business owners, mentors and strategists with you!

You can attend the free conference from September 17 – 18, 2018 online as part of the Virtual Conference Series.

Click on the Growth & Success box below to register and attend:

Register for Free



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

Growth & Success ConGrowth & Success Con
September 17, 2018, Online

This small business virtual conference is dedicated to supporting entrepreneurs at all stages who are stuck in the daily grind of building their businesses and struggle to get solid advice and guidance. An amazing panel of experts in various disciplines and business coaches will share tips & tricks on topics including Growth, Marketing, Management & Business Building for Success. Register today!


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends.

You can see a full list of events, contest and award listings or post your own events by visiting the Small Business Events Calendar.

Image: Shutterstock

This article, "Attend This Free Online Event And Gain Insights from Seasoned Entrepreneurs" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

10 Expert Suggestions for Getting Your Content Found

Content marketing can be a tricky strategy for small businesses to master. Not only do you need to actually create content that’s both relevant and effective, but you also need to find ways to get that content in front of potential customers. SEO, social media and collaboration can all be effective strategies in this area. Read what members of the online small business community have to say on those subjects below.

Check Out These Powerful Examples of Link Worthy Content

If you want to build links to your content, you need to create content that’s actually worthy of being linked to. It can help to gather some inspiration by looking at other link-worthy content. Here are some examples to guide your own content creation from Anne Leuman of TopRank Marketing.

Gain Visibility Using Instagram Hashtags for Business

Once you create content on Instagram, hashtags can help you get it in front of more potential customers. However, it’s important to have a strategy in mind so you actually get found by relevant people. Learn more in a recent Social Media Examiner post by Jenn Herman.

Get the Scoop on LinkedIn Hashtags

If you use LinkedIn to promote your content, you may have noticed a recent update that includes the ability to add hashtags. This new feature is being tested and could potentially help you reach more users. Rachel Strella discusses more in a post on Strella Social Media. And BizSugar members offer additional thoughts here.

Save Time on Content Curation and Collaboration

Involving others in your content strategy can be a great way to get your message in front of new eyes. Curating content and collaborating with others can be time consuming. But there are tools out there to help you save time, like the ones listed in a recent Content Marketing Institute post by Aaron Orendorff.

Overcome Common Link Building Blockers

When it comes to building links to your content, there are some common challenges and mistakes keeping content creators from making as much of an impact. Read about some of the most common blockers and how to overcome them in a Search Engine Land post by Paddy Moogan.

Rethink Authenticity in Your Content Strategy

It can be difficult for a lot of marketers to strike a balance between creating authentic content and creating a performance that gets results. In a recent Copyblogger post, Stefanie Flaxman talks about how you can rethink that idea and create authentic content. And you can also see commentary from the BizSugar community too.

Drive Sales with Your Instagram Marketing Strategy

Of course, the overall goal of your content marketing strategy should be to increase sales for your business, whether that’s directly or indirectly. If you’re looking to drive real sales to your small business from Instagram, check out the tips in a rcent Quick Sprout post by Neil Patel.

Learn What’s New with Facebook in 2018

Part of taking advantage of social platforms like Facebook to gain visibility for your content is keeping up with new features. Facebook is constantly evolving.  You can learn more about what’s new on the platform in this SMB CEO post by Ivan Widjaya.

Use Mentoring to Increase Your Odds of Small Business Survival

A recent report found mentoring can help small businesses survive for longer. Jonathan Dyer of Dyer News discusses the findings in this post. And BizSugar members also share their thoughts on the post in their community.

Avoid These Blogging Mistakes on Other Sites

Sharing your expertise on new sites can be a great way to increase your content’s reach. However, there are a lot of common mistakes that go along with this approach. In a recent CorpNet post, Matej Markovic goes into some of the most prevalent ones and offers solutions.

If you’d like to suggest your favorite small business content to be considered for an upcoming community roundup, please send your news tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "10 Expert Suggestions for Getting Your Content Found" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

10 Expert Suggestions for Getting Your Content Found

Content marketing can be a tricky strategy for small businesses to master. Not only do you need to actually create content that’s both relevant and effective, but you also need to find ways to get that content in front of potential customers. SEO, social media and collaboration can all be effective strategies in this area. Read what members of the online small business community have to say on those subjects below.

Check Out These Powerful Examples of Link Worthy Content

If you want to build links to your content, you need to create content that’s actually worthy of being linked to. It can help to gather some inspiration by looking at other link-worthy content. Here are some examples to guide your own content creation from Anne Leuman of TopRank Marketing.

Gain Visibility Using Instagram Hashtags for Business

Once you create content on Instagram, hashtags can help you get it in front of more potential customers. However, it’s important to have a strategy in mind so you actually get found by relevant people. Learn more in a recent Social Media Examiner post by Jenn Herman.

Get the Scoop on LinkedIn Hashtags

If you use LinkedIn to promote your content, you may have noticed a recent update that includes the ability to add hashtags. This new feature is being tested and could potentially help you reach more users. Rachel Strella discusses more in a post on Strella Social Media. And BizSugar members offer additional thoughts here.

Save Time on Content Curation and Collaboration

Involving others in your content strategy can be a great way to get your message in front of new eyes. Curating content and collaborating with others can be time consuming. But there are tools out there to help you save time, like the ones listed in a recent Content Marketing Institute post by Aaron Orendorff.

Overcome Common Link Building Blockers

When it comes to building links to your content, there are some common challenges and mistakes keeping content creators from making as much of an impact. Read about some of the most common blockers and how to overcome them in a Search Engine Land post by Paddy Moogan.

Rethink Authenticity in Your Content Strategy

It can be difficult for a lot of marketers to strike a balance between creating authentic content and creating a performance that gets results. In a recent Copyblogger post, Stefanie Flaxman talks about how you can rethink that idea and create authentic content. And you can also see commentary from the BizSugar community too.

Drive Sales with Your Instagram Marketing Strategy

Of course, the overall goal of your content marketing strategy should be to increase sales for your business, whether that’s directly or indirectly. If you’re looking to drive real sales to your small business from Instagram, check out the tips in a rcent Quick Sprout post by Neil Patel.

Learn What’s New with Facebook in 2018

Part of taking advantage of social platforms like Facebook to gain visibility for your content is keeping up with new features. Facebook is constantly evolving.  You can learn more about what’s new on the platform in this SMB CEO post by Ivan Widjaya.

Use Mentoring to Increase Your Odds of Small Business Survival

A recent report found mentoring can help small businesses survive for longer. Jonathan Dyer of Dyer News discusses the findings in this post. And BizSugar members also share their thoughts on the post in their community.

Avoid These Blogging Mistakes on Other Sites

Sharing your expertise on new sites can be a great way to increase your content’s reach. However, there are a lot of common mistakes that go along with this approach. In a recent CorpNet post, Matej Markovic goes into some of the most prevalent ones and offers solutions.

If you’d like to suggest your favorite small business content to be considered for an upcoming community roundup, please send your news tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Photo via Shutterstock

This article, "10 Expert Suggestions for Getting Your Content Found" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Rebooted Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Brings New Features to Your Business Computer

Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Reboots an Old Favorite

The original Microsoft IntelliMouse was launched in 1996, with the last model being released in 2003. It has taken 15 years, but Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) has decided to revive this iconic mouse with the new Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse.

Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse

As to why Microsoft decided this was the right time to bring back the IntelliMouse, Simon Dearsley, Devices Design Director at Microsoft, explained the reasoning on the company’s official Windows Blogs. Dearsly said tracking and switch technology, as well as price, has matured, which presented an opportunity for the company.

Dearsly added Microsoft saw the opportunity to “Improve on an icon by updating it with modern technology. We know how important the IntelliMouse range has been and wanted to take a moment to reflect on the history of it and do something special for our fans.”

Keeping the Classic Design

The first IntelliMouse was originally sculpted by hand by the most experienced mouse designers in the world, this according to Dearsly. For Microsoft, it meant leaving a good thing alone and instead channeling its focus to updating the performance with the latest technology.

Inside the new IntelliMouse, Microsoft has upgraded the device with new mechanical engineering and new structures to make it stronger than the original.

This includes adding three Kailh switches for the middle wheel and side buttons as well as making improvements to the two side buttons. The three classic buttons can be customized to introduce more efficiency to your workflow.

When it comes to tracking, a DPI range of up to 3200 makes the mouse more precise. And at $39.99, the Microsoft Classic Intellimouse is an affordable peripheral with great design and technology.

Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Reboots an Old Favorite

Workflow Efficiency

The mouse has evolved greatly since it was invented by Douglas Engelbart in the 1960s when it was called the “X-Y Position Indicator for a Display System.” As it continued evolving, it introduced new levels of efficiency in applications and eventually web browsing and more.

It is almost inconceivable to picture a computer without some type of mouse capability these days. Along with the keyboard, the mouse has become an indispensable tool likely to remain with us until something better comes along.

You can get the new Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse here.

Images: Microsoft

This article, "Rebooted Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Brings New Features to Your Business Computer" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Rebooted Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Brings New Features to Your Business Computer

Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Reboots an Old Favorite

The original Microsoft IntelliMouse was launched in 1996, with the last model being released in 2003. It has taken 15 years, but Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) has decided to revive this iconic mouse with the new Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse.

Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse

As to why Microsoft decided this was the right time to bring back the IntelliMouse, Simon Dearsley, Devices Design Director at Microsoft, explained the reasoning on the company’s official Windows Blogs. Dearsly said tracking and switch technology, as well as price, has matured, which presented an opportunity for the company.

Dearsly added Microsoft saw the opportunity to “Improve on an icon by updating it with modern technology. We know how important the IntelliMouse range has been and wanted to take a moment to reflect on the history of it and do something special for our fans.”

Keeping the Classic Design

The first IntelliMouse was originally sculpted by hand by the most experienced mouse designers in the world, this according to Dearsly. For Microsoft, it meant leaving a good thing alone and instead channeling its focus to updating the performance with the latest technology.

Inside the new IntelliMouse, Microsoft has upgraded the device with new mechanical engineering and new structures to make it stronger than the original.

This includes adding three Kailh switches for the middle wheel and side buttons as well as making improvements to the two side buttons. The three classic buttons can be customized to introduce more efficiency to your workflow.

When it comes to tracking, a DPI range of up to 3200 makes the mouse more precise. And at $39.99, the Microsoft Classic Intellimouse is an affordable peripheral with great design and technology.

Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Reboots an Old Favorite

Workflow Efficiency

The mouse has evolved greatly since it was invented by Douglas Engelbart in the 1960s when it was called the “X-Y Position Indicator for a Display System.” As it continued evolving, it introduced new levels of efficiency in applications and eventually web browsing and more.

It is almost inconceivable to picture a computer without some type of mouse capability these days. Along with the keyboard, the mouse has become an indispensable tool likely to remain with us until something better comes along.

You can get the new Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse here.

Images: Microsoft

This article, "Rebooted Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse Brings New Features to Your Business Computer" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Burn the Business Plan! is a Book about Turning Entrepreneurial Vision Into Practical Solution

Burn the business plan! Burn the business plan! Wait? Is that all I need to do to get started in this

Does author Carl Schramm truly believe entrepreneurs should “Burn The Business Plan” as the provocative title of his book suggests? If you were to ask the  former president of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the answer would likely be no.

Schramm’s colorfully titled, Burn The Business Plan: What Great Entrepreneurs Really Do does offer plenty of other suggestions though.  Schramm, a university professor at Syracuse whom The Economist calls the “evangelist of entrepreneurship,” wrote this book to dispel the myths people hear about entrepreneurship and share the truths for building sustainable success.

What Is Burn the Business Plan About?

Burn The Business Plan covers key scenarios entrepreneurs face in terms of setting entrepreneurial expectations. The first chapter makes its case for burning the business plan, of course, but the rest  of the book gets to the motivation behind business building. The book also looks at resources, both professional and personal. It also looks at how to learn from other entrepreneurs and how to create an entrepreneurial culture.

The rest of the book focuses on the motivations driving entrepreneurs to build a business. Good points and counterpoints exist in the chapters, with supporting materials where possible. In Chapter 5, for example, Schramm cautions about toxic mentors and gives four examples.  When seeking an example of how entrepreneurs can improve their  learning speed, Schramm mentions OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act), an approach to decision making used by pilots when making quick judgments. Devised by John Boyd, an Air Force pilot who served in the Korean War, this approach helps entrepreneurs broaden their view, one of Schramm’s main purposes in writing the book.

What I Liked about Burn the Business Plan

Schramm does a very good job of providing useful explanations that show the reader why certain business ideas are accepted without question even though they can’t stand up to scrutiny.  I liked the book’s emphasis on creating a platform and selecting mentors.  When Schramm explains how an idea is executed, he notes how this happens through product trials.

“No one knows at the outset …exactly how her idea will be valued by customers. Thus, every startup becomes a platform on which to develop and test the utility of an evolving product.”

As software becomes part of a business model, businesses have to rethink how they deliver products and services. That means deploying multiple dynamic plans rather than a single static business plan and rethinking your road map regularly as information changes.

Schramm’s ideas flow smoothly from chapter to chapter without being repetitive.  In fact Chapter 6, Big Companies Can Be Schools For Start Ups, was a standout chapter to me.  Schramm explains how large enterprises benefit startups in a somewhat unusual way. While these behemoths certainly can scale, they can also become bureaucratic. This sometimes leaves open untapped opportunities and innovations. And these can entice employees who had never showed any interest in entrepreneurship before to launch businesses in order to take advantage of these opportunities. Schramm calls these people Spinout Entrepreneurs and explains how and why they can contribute to a small business’s success.

“Very few spinout entrepreneurs start companies outside of the industries in which they work. The obvious reason is that they have acquired specific knowledge….Executives within an industry often move from one company to another. They are not hired because they are bringing company secrets, but because they know the common culture of the industry.”

Schramm shares a few specific stories, like entrepreneur Gary Burrell, head designer for King Radio, who went on to design communication and navigation systems used by King’s customers.

Schramm says Ewing Kaufman, founder of Marion Labs and the Ewing Marion Kaufmann Institute (Schramm’s former employer), had especially inspired him. In fact, Schramm ended up dedicating the book to Kaufman. According to Schramm, Kaufman had always encouraged this kind of entrepreneurship, even if it meant a few employees would leave:

“Ewing Kaufman delighted in knowing that many new companies, at least fifteen, were created by former employees of Marion Labs. He viewed his company as a nursery for other entrepreneurs.”

Schramm also explains however the need for something extra on the part of entrepreneurs who find themselves in such a place:

“But being in an innovative environment is not enough. An aspiring entrepreneur needs to pay close attention to the process by which companies develop new products.”

I know many lost entrepreneurs who have identified a product or service, but not a clear idea on how they will deliver that product.  The Amazons of the world know about delivery, and Schramm appreciates it too.   He provides stories of successful entrepreneurs and gets past the typical “passion-is-important” pronouncements to look at the practical side of what works and what doesn’t.

What Could Have Been Done Differently?

What may have been missing in the book was a chapter on team dynamics.  While the book relied on many well-chosen stories to make its points, more detail might have been helpful to see exactly how people behind the scenes made things happen.

But much of this lack of detail is down to the book’s brevity. And the slimness of the volume is also its virtue, delivering important, easy to digest insights to busy entrepreneurs who may not have the tome for a lengthy read.

One significant concept Schramm hits home is how innovation can come with knowledge acquired along the way. One example of this from the book is how two University of South Carolina coaches applied their observations about the materials used in many sports uniforms to launch Sheex, a performance bedding manufacturer.

Why Read Burn The Business Plan?

Entrepreneurs should learn how to plan without letting their plans become restrictive.  Reading Burn The Business Plan will help you see how to focus not just on your vision but on how to make a vision into practical reality delivering real value for customers.

Image: Amazon

This article, "Burn the Business Plan! is a Book about Turning Entrepreneurial Vision Into Practical Solution" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Burn the Business Plan! is a Book about Turning Entrepreneurial Vision Into Practical Solution

Burn the business plan! Burn the business plan! Wait? Is that all I need to do to get started in this

Does author Carl Schramm truly believe entrepreneurs should “Burn The Business Plan” as the provocative title of his book suggests? If you were to ask the  former president of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the answer would likely be no.

Schramm’s colorfully titled, Burn The Business Plan: What Great Entrepreneurs Really Do does offer plenty of other suggestions though.  Schramm, a university professor at Syracuse whom The Economist calls the “evangelist of entrepreneurship,” wrote this book to dispel the myths people hear about entrepreneurship and share the truths for building sustainable success.

What Is Burn the Business Plan About?

Burn The Business Plan covers key scenarios entrepreneurs face in terms of setting entrepreneurial expectations. The first chapter makes its case for burning the business plan, of course, but the rest  of the book gets to the motivation behind business building. The book also looks at resources, both professional and personal. It also looks at how to learn from other entrepreneurs and how to create an entrepreneurial culture.

The rest of the book focuses on the motivations driving entrepreneurs to build a business. Good points and counterpoints exist in the chapters, with supporting materials where possible. In Chapter 5, for example, Schramm cautions about toxic mentors and gives four examples.  When seeking an example of how entrepreneurs can improve their  learning speed, Schramm mentions OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act), an approach to decision making used by pilots when making quick judgments. Devised by John Boyd, an Air Force pilot who served in the Korean War, this approach helps entrepreneurs broaden their view, one of Schramm’s main purposes in writing the book.

What I Liked about Burn the Business Plan

Schramm does a very good job of providing useful explanations that show the reader why certain business ideas are accepted without question even though they can’t stand up to scrutiny.  I liked the book’s emphasis on creating a platform and selecting mentors.  When Schramm explains how an idea is executed, he notes how this happens through product trials.

“No one knows at the outset …exactly how her idea will be valued by customers. Thus, every startup becomes a platform on which to develop and test the utility of an evolving product.”

As software becomes part of a business model, businesses have to rethink how they deliver products and services. That means deploying multiple dynamic plans rather than a single static business plan and rethinking your road map regularly as information changes.

Schramm’s ideas flow smoothly from chapter to chapter without being repetitive.  In fact Chapter 6, Big Companies Can Be Schools For Start Ups, was a standout chapter to me.  Schramm explains how large enterprises benefit startups in a somewhat unusual way. While these behemoths certainly can scale, they can also become bureaucratic. This sometimes leaves open untapped opportunities and innovations. And these can entice employees who had never showed any interest in entrepreneurship before to launch businesses in order to take advantage of these opportunities. Schramm calls these people Spinout Entrepreneurs and explains how and why they can contribute to a small business’s success.

“Very few spinout entrepreneurs start companies outside of the industries in which they work. The obvious reason is that they have acquired specific knowledge….Executives within an industry often move from one company to another. They are not hired because they are bringing company secrets, but because they know the common culture of the industry.”

Schramm shares a few specific stories, like entrepreneur Gary Burrell, head designer for King Radio, who went on to design communication and navigation systems used by King’s customers.

Schramm says Ewing Kaufman, founder of Marion Labs and the Ewing Marion Kaufmann Institute (Schramm’s former employer), had especially inspired him. In fact, Schramm ended up dedicating the book to Kaufman. According to Schramm, Kaufman had always encouraged this kind of entrepreneurship, even if it meant a few employees would leave:

“Ewing Kaufman delighted in knowing that many new companies, at least fifteen, were created by former employees of Marion Labs. He viewed his company as a nursery for other entrepreneurs.”

Schramm also explains however the need for something extra on the part of entrepreneurs who find themselves in such a place:

“But being in an innovative environment is not enough. An aspiring entrepreneur needs to pay close attention to the process by which companies develop new products.”

I know many lost entrepreneurs who have identified a product or service, but not a clear idea on how they will deliver that product.  The Amazons of the world know about delivery, and Schramm appreciates it too.   He provides stories of successful entrepreneurs and gets past the typical “passion-is-important” pronouncements to look at the practical side of what works and what doesn’t.

What Could Have Been Done Differently?

What may have been missing in the book was a chapter on team dynamics.  While the book relied on many well-chosen stories to make its points, more detail might have been helpful to see exactly how people behind the scenes made things happen.

But much of this lack of detail is down to the book’s brevity. And the slimness of the volume is also its virtue, delivering important, easy to digest insights to busy entrepreneurs who may not have the tome for a lengthy read.

One significant concept Schramm hits home is how innovation can come with knowledge acquired along the way. One example of this from the book is how two University of South Carolina coaches applied their observations about the materials used in many sports uniforms to launch Sheex, a performance bedding manufacturer.

Why Read Burn The Business Plan?

Entrepreneurs should learn how to plan without letting their plans become restrictive.  Reading Burn The Business Plan will help you see how to focus not just on your vision but on how to make a vision into practical reality delivering real value for customers.

Image: Amazon

This article, "Burn the Business Plan! is a Book about Turning Entrepreneurial Vision Into Practical Solution" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

The rich world needs higher real wage growth

CENTRAL bankers and economists have spilled much ink in recent years on the question of why wages have not grown more. The average unemployment rate in advanced economies is 5.3%, lower than before the financial crisis. Yet even in America, the hottest rich-world economy, pay is growing by less than 3% annually. This month the European Central Bank devoted much of its annual shindig in Sintra, Portugal to discussing the wage puzzle.

Recent data show, however, that the problem rich countries face is not that nominal wage growth has failed to respond to economic conditions. It is that inflation is eating up pay increases and that real—that is, inflation-adjusted—wages are therefore stagnant. Real wages in America and the euro zone, for example, are growing more slowly even as the world economy, and headline pay, have both picked up (see chart).

...


via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

This Week in Small Business, How Will the Supreme Court’s Sales Tax Ruling Affect You?

It’s time for another edition of This Week in Small Business. In this series, I take a look at three of my favorite articles to appear on Small Business Trends in the past week.

I’m usually joined by a guest to go over these stories and this week I’m rejoined by my friend and small business ecommerce expert John “Colderice” Lawson.

This week, we started our discussion talking about independent retailers. As Rieva Lesonsky reminded us this week, July is Independent Retailers Month.

John and I spoke on the importance and value that independent retailers provide to local economies. Check out the video to see what difference just $10 spent at an independent retailer can make.

Importance of Online Sales Tax Supreme Court Ruling

We then switched focus to a subject I brought up in last week’s video, on the Supreme Court’s ruling that states can require collection of sales tax for online sales. John does not see this decision as a positive for business.

“The effect is going to be laborious for a lot of business owners,” he says.

Check out our whole discussion on the Supreme Court ruling and lasting impact it will have on businesses like yours.

Finally, we talk about the recent submission from the Young Entrepreneur Council and their picks for the top podcasts for small business owners and entrepreneurs. You’ll find out why I was happy to talk about this particular subject this week.

For the rest of the week in small business news, check out the roundup below.

Remember, you’ll get notified the moment new This Week in Small Business videos are released — every Friday afternoon — when you subscribe to the Small Business Trends YouTube channel today.

Management

6 Must-Haves to Include on Your Small Business Mid-Year Legal Checklist

Summer has officially started. This means beaches and barbecues, summer vacation for the kids, and maybe a little extra juggling for parents. It also means we’re halfway through the year, making it the perfect time to assess the legal and tax health of your business.

Interview Questions You May and May Not Ask Under New Massachusetts Pay Equity Law

On July 1, a new equal pay law will go into effect in Massachusetts — and it will impact small businesses in ways of which you may want to be aware. The Massachusetts Equal Pay Act (MEPA) is intended to ensure greater fairness and provide clarity on what constitutes unlawful wage discrimination.

Marketing

Google Ditches AdWords for Ads, Aims at Smarter, Mobile Search

Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) is ditching AdWords and DoubleClick. Google Rebrands Ad Offerings In an attempt to simplify how you create and manage ad campaigns with Google, the search engine company is rebranding these services as Google Ads, Google Marketing Platform, and Google Ad Manager.

Introbrand Aims to Help Small Businesses Create DIY Effects for Your Online Video

Video has become the calling card of today’s digital business ecosystem. And for many small businesses, the DIY route is the way to go because of the cost. Introbrand has created a service which fills a particular niche in this segment. It allows you to make intros, outros and logo animations for your videos.

Retail Trends

Selling to Walmart Doesn’t Have to Be Hard, 3 Tips From the Retailer’s Annual Open Call Event

Over 450 small businesses met buyers head-on at Walmart’s fifth annual Open Call event recently. More than 100 entrepreneurs pitching their American-made products for sale with the retail giant were rewarded by getting to move onto the next step in the process.  A few exceptional pitches landed businesses a deal on the spot.

Small Business Operations

Amazon  WorkDocs Introduces Multi-User Collaboration with Benefits for Small Business Teams

Amazon Web Services (AWS) just announced a new collaborative editing feature for Amazon WorkDocs with big implications for small business teams. The new capability is made possible as a result of a partnership with Hancom, a company which provides office productivity software.

Your  Employees Could Save 33 Minutes and 36 Seconds Per Week with Visual Communication

New research has revealed employees can save 33 minutes and 36 seconds over a 40 hour week by simply using visual communications.

Social Media

Facebook Tools for Video Creators Generate New Small Business Opportunities

Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) announced it is updating the tools it launched for the creator community earlier this year. They will now have new ways in which they can engage with their communities and build a business on Facebook while at the same time managing their presence. Creators and influencers have become a driving force for brands.

Technology Trends

Ricoh Rolls Out Cloud Solutions for Small Businesses

The new RICOH Cloud Workflow Solutions portfolio is going to give small businesses access to an affordable subscription service for reducing manual processes. RICOH (TYO: 7752) looks to eliminate manual steps while reducing manual data entry and managing the interoperability of different systems.

Freshworks 360 Unites Sales, Marketing and Support Channels for Small Businesses

With the launch of Freshworks 360, small businesses can now access a fully integrated cloud-based omnichannel customer engagement solution. Freshworks 360 will bring together and manage all support, sales and marketing communications across different channels on a single platform.

Shopify Ping Allows you to Manage Your Ecommerce Site from Anywhere

The launch of Shopify Ping will allow merchants on the eCommerce platform to manage their business no matter where they are. Ping is going to bring together customer conversations and marketing workflows on websites, Facebook Messenger or SMS along with an intelligent assistant called Kit on Apples’s iOS mobile platform.

This article, "This Week in Small Business, How Will the Supreme Court’s Sales Tax Ruling Affect You?" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds