Infusionsoft Rebrands as Keap With Software to Streamline Client Tasks for Small Businesses

Infusionsoft Rebrands as Keap With Software Streamlining Client Tasks for Small Businesses

Infusionsoft is now known as Keap.

And Keap has a new smart client management software product built specifically for small businesses.

The Keap rebranding and launch is specifically designed to appeal to the large market of small home based businesses as well as those in the professional and personal service industries that have been previously shut out of automation because of the cost and technical requirements around software.

This software offering automates certain client tasks like scheduling appointments, following up on quotes and leads and even collecting payments. It targets small businesses like home repair, fitness and even business consulting as well as interior design and prompts the user when it’s time to make contact.

Brent Leary Managing Partner, CRM Essentials, added his expert input:

“Rebranding InfusionSoft to Keap and launching a separate, simplified product aimed at a bigger pool of smaller businesses with different needs to their traditional customer base is a big undertaking.  It couples reaching a new customer audience with one message while addressing concerns of current customers who may feel the shift in branding signals potential change in the products and services they’ve grown accustomed to,” he wrote in an email. “It will take a great deal of effort for Keap to attract new customers at scale for the new product, while retaining current customers for the long  haul.”

Keap Rebrand

The rebrand and new product launch are the result of two years of research into small businesses.  Keap CEO Clate Mask provided some statistics in a press release.

“We discovered small service providers waste time juggling five to seven tools just to book appointments, send communications, provide quotes or collect payments. That is 50 hours a month that could be spent servicing more clients, growing the business or at home with family.”

Features

Some of the important features include the fact new smart client management software streamlines important functions into one place. There’s also a mobile app so that small business owners can get access to client information 24/7.

There’s also a series of auto reminders and personalized follow-ups that are designed to save valuable time for small business owners. It streamlines and can almost eliminate going back and forth with clients through email or on the phone to follow up on quotes and proposals. It even makes it easier to chase late payments.

There’s a one click pay now button so online invoices get paid quickly and easily.

Work Ahead

Finally, Leary had a few words on the work ahead for the new venture.

“Keap will have to accelerate their efforts to gain the traction they need to scale up customers for the new product.  It took them 15 years to reach the 200K user mark.  With more competition from a variety of directions, they will have to take a different approach than what they’ve done in the past in order to scale up their customer acquisition activities to reach the “millions of users” goal they want to grow to.”

Keap were pioneers in both CRM and marketing automation small business.The company has over  200,000 users worldwide under the Infusionsoft and Keap product banner. They have headquarters  in Chandler, Arizona and other offices in  San Francisco and Atlanta. Visit them online at www.keap.com or connect here on Facebook.

Image: Keap

This article, "Infusionsoft Rebrands as Keap With Software to Streamline Client Tasks for Small Businesses" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Infusionsoft Rebrands as Keap With Software to Streamline Client Tasks for Small Businesses

Infusionsoft Rebrands as Keap With Software Streamlining Client Tasks for Small Businesses

Infusionsoft is now known as Keap.

And Keap has a new smart client management software product built specifically for small businesses.

The Keap rebranding and launch is specifically designed to appeal to the large market of small home based businesses as well as those in the professional and personal service industries that have been previously shut out of automation because of the cost and technical requirements around software.

This software offering automates certain client tasks like scheduling appointments, following up on quotes and leads and even collecting payments. It targets small businesses like home repair, fitness and even business consulting as well as interior design and prompts the user when it’s time to make contact.

Brent Leary Managing Partner, CRM Essentials, added his expert input:

“Rebranding InfusionSoft to Keap and launching a separate, simplified product aimed at a bigger pool of smaller businesses with different needs to their traditional customer base is a big undertaking.  It couples reaching a new customer audience with one message while addressing concerns of current customers who may feel the shift in branding signals potential change in the products and services they’ve grown accustomed to,” he wrote in an email. “It will take a great deal of effort for Keap to attract new customers at scale for the new product, while retaining current customers for the long  haul.”

Keap Rebrand

The rebrand and new product launch are the result of two years of research into small businesses.  Keap CEO Clate Mask provided some statistics in a press release.

“We discovered small service providers waste time juggling five to seven tools just to book appointments, send communications, provide quotes or collect payments. That is 50 hours a month that could be spent servicing more clients, growing the business or at home with family.”

Features

Some of the important features include the fact new smart client management software streamlines important functions into one place. There’s also a mobile app so that small business owners can get access to client information 24/7.

There’s also a series of auto reminders and personalized follow-ups that are designed to save valuable time for small business owners. It streamlines and can almost eliminate going back and forth with clients through email or on the phone to follow up on quotes and proposals. It even makes it easier to chase late payments.

There’s a one click pay now button so online invoices get paid quickly and easily.

Work Ahead

Finally, Leary had a few words on the work ahead for the new venture.

“Keap will have to accelerate their efforts to gain the traction they need to scale up customers for the new product.  It took them 15 years to reach the 200K user mark.  With more competition from a variety of directions, they will have to take a different approach than what they’ve done in the past in order to scale up their customer acquisition activities to reach the “millions of users” goal they want to grow to.”

Keap were pioneers in both CRM and marketing automation small business.The company has over  200,000 users worldwide under the Infusionsoft and Keap product banner. They have headquarters  in Chandler, Arizona and other offices in  San Francisco and Atlanta. Visit them online at www.keap.com or connect here on Facebook.

Image: Keap

This article, "Infusionsoft Rebrands as Keap With Software to Streamline Client Tasks for Small Businesses" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Puerto Rico’s biggest bank came out of Hurricane Maria stronger

PUERTO RICO was never the most financially stable of places. After years of trouble its government defaulted in 2016. Then, in 2017, Hurricane Maria roared in. The island took close to a year to restore electricity fully, and financial restructuring continues. Manufacturers decamped during the power cuts; many did not return. Banco Popular, the biggest financial institution, which had already been buffeted by a wave of bad loans, was hit by another. Its failure would have been no surprise.

Prepare to be astonished, then: Popular is in pretty decent shape. Part of that is due to the island’s tentative recovery. Sales of cement and cars have been strong; tourism is starting to pick up. But even so, Popular’s performance is striking. The KBW index, a broad measure of American banking stocks, has fallen by 16% in the past year; Popular’s shares are up by a third. Over the past five years the KBW index rose by 46%; Popular’s shares...



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Conflicts in the credit-derivatives market threaten to undermine it

SHAKESPEARE WAS a fan of the quibble. His plots often hinge on the gap between word and intended meaning. Macbeth was supposed to be invincible because he could be harmed by “none of woman born”—but his killer, Macduff, was delivered by Caesarean section. In “The Merchant of Venice” Portia saves Antonio by arguing that though he agreed to forfeit a pound of flesh to Shylock if he defaulted on a loan, he did not agree to lose blood.

Traders in credit-derivative markets are keen on quibbles, too. Credit-default swaps (CDSs) are insurance-like derivatives designed to compensate lenders when a company goes bust. A simple enough aim, you might think, but there are plenty of devilish details. A company can go bust in many ways: it can close and have its assets sold off, or restructure its debt and keep operating. And CDS contracts pay out the difference between a bond’s face value and the price of the cheapest bond available, even though the underlying...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Illicit financial flows are hard to stop

WHEN FOREIGN aid enters developing countries, it is welcomed with handshakes and ribbon-cutting. Private money, by contrast, is sometimes smuggled across borders or siphoned into offshore bank accounts. Everyone agrees that such “illicit financial flows” are a problem. A report published on January 28th by Global Financial Integrity (GFI), a campaign group, estimates that illicit flows to and from developing countries are worth more than a fifth of their total trade with the rich world.

Governments have pledged to plug the leaks, including as part of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. If only they could reach agreement on what they are talking about. A few rich countries, notably America, complain that illicit flows are not properly defined. Statisticians are still puzzling over how they can be accurately measured.

Obviously, gun-running and drug-trafficking should count; in 2011 the UN estimated that financial flows linked to transnational organised crime were worth 1.5% of global GDP. Bribes, and the proceeds of unregistered trade in legal goods, such as cigarettes, probably should, too. But broader definitions also fold in tax avoidance, which may not be illegal. The result is hopelessly vague, diverting attention from dirty money to smear legitimate businesses, argues Maya Forstater of the Centre for Global...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Value investing is long on virtue but has been short on reward

IN A COMEDY sketch from the 1980s, Rowan Atkinson plays the devil as a cross between a package-holiday guide and a louche English bureaucrat. Dressed in a smoking jacket, he welcomes the damned to Hell and, consulting his clipboard, sorts them into groups. Lawyers? Join the thieves and murderers over there. The French? Come down here with the Germans. Atheists? You must be feeling pretty silly. And finally, Christians? I’m sorry, your faith was an error.

Even if they are not confronted by hard evidence, everyone is occasionally troubled by the thought that their beliefs are misplaced. A bad run of stockmarket returns is such a test of faith. Investors who favour “value” stocks—those with a low price relative to the book value of a firm’s assets—have had to wrestle more than most with doubt. If you buy value, and are patient, your reward should be superior returns. But for much of the past decade, value has seemed a...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

An overbanked region sees some welcome consolidation

WHEN YOU have 60 banks in a country of just 9.5m people, there is much to be said for merging three at a time. On January 29th Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank (ADCB), the third-biggest bank by assets in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), agreed to buy eighth-ranked Union National Bank in an all-share deal. The enlarged ADCB will then swallow Al Hilal Bank, a smaller, Islamic bank. All three are controlled by Abu Dhabi’s government, which will own 60.2% of the new entity.

The deal is the latest of several tie-ups, actual or mooted, among banks in the Gulf. On January 24th Kuwait Finance House, that country’s second-biggest bank, announced “tentative” agreement on takeover terms with Ahli United Bank, of Bahrain. Saudi British Bank and Alawwal Bank are joining forces to form Saudi Arabia’s third-largest lender. The kingdom’s number one, National Commercial Bank, is talking to Riyad Bank, the current number four. And in 2017...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

A Chinese state-backed giant’s rapid rise in global trading of food

THE WORLD of grain trading is a gerontocracy. The four giant firms that dominate global agricultural flows—ADM, Bunge, Cargill and Louis Dreyfus, collectively known as the ABCDs—were all founded over a century ago. Their age is an edge: their unique networks of silos, ports, ships and farmer relationships, built over decades, make them indispensable middlemen. But a toddler from China is threatening to put a pitchfork in the works. COFCO International (CIL), the overseas trading arm of China’s state-owned food and oil giant, wants to “become a true global agribusiness”, says Chi Jingtao, its chairman. It is barely four years old.

Mr Chi’s aims are not only commercial but strategic. China does not have enough arable land to feed its 1.4bn people. As a rising middle class consumes more meat, that gap worsens, for animal feed is mostly made of grain. One solution from the government has been to buy farmland abroad....



via Business Feeds

Has Comcast bet against technology?

Roberts and Murdoch, big spenders

IN FORGING HIS media empire Rupert Murdoch never worried much about whether he was spending too much money. He thought it mattered more what businesses he was building. Such as, in 1989, a cash-haemorrhaging satellite broadcaster in Britain called Sky Television. Decades later Brian Roberts, chief executive of Comcast, an American pay-TV giant, proved Mr Murdoch right again. In October he completed a deal to buy Sky, a successor to Sky Television, for £30.6bn ($40bn).

Mr Roberts is also testing the wisdom of profligate spending with his deal. In buying Sky he is taking Comcast into Britain, Italy and Germany, adding 24m customers and $20bn a year in revenue (including Sky, Comcast has a total of 54m customers and $110bn in annual revenues). Critics say he massively overpaid for an antiquated technology at a time when internet video is the future. Four months on Mr...



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America lifts sanctions on Oleg Deripaska’s business empire

AT FIRST GLANCE, the American government’s decision to lift sanctions on Oleg Deripaska’s business empire looks questionable. He is a Russian oligarch close to the Kremlin and a former business partner of Donald Trump’s erstwhile campaign manager, Paul Manafort. Shares in EN+, Mr Deripaska’s holding firm, soared this week after a deal with America’s Treasury department that saw Mr Deripaska reduce his ownership stake below 50% in exchange for the sanctions relief. Given Mr Trump’s alleged fondness for Russia, many in America smelled a rat.

But what unfolded may be less a tale of wrongdoing than of incompetence. Richard Nephew, a former State Department sanctions specialist, compares the debacle to the children’s rhyme about the old lady who swallowed a fly—officials tried to solve a problem but compounded it. It began with the new Trump administration’s perceived softness on Russia, which spurred a Republican-...



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Harley-Davidson brought low by tariffs and demographics

Motorcycle-maintenance plan

A TOUR OF the modernist building of the Harley-Davidson museum in Milwaukee helps to explain why the midwestern maker of motorcycles has iconic status, but also why it is struggling. Nearly all the visitors are white, middle-aged men, some clad in leather and heavily tattooed, others dressed conservatively. Harley is the quintessential baby-boomer brand but its customers are slowing down.

The firm has been losing sales at home for eight consecutive quarters with the latest being no exception. Sales in America plunged by a tenth in the three months ending at the end of December compared with the same period a year earlier, it said this week. The total cost of tariffs (those imposed specifically on its bikes by the European Union and China, and also those levied by America on imports of steel and aluminium, its main materials), together with restructuring costs, wiped out its...



via Business Feeds

Netflix, but for video games

Clouds are on the way

THE ABILITY to stream films and songs over the internet has upended the entertainment industry, but the $140bn market in video-gaming has resisted the revolution. That may soon change. A battle is brewing between big media and technology firms to see who—if anybody—can become the Netflix of video games.

In October Google began tests of a cloud-gaming service called “Project Stream”, using a big-budget game, “Assassin’s Creed Odyssey” (a still is pictured). The game was designed to run on dedicated consoles and beefy PCs. But with the computational heavy-lifting shifted to Google’s data-centres, even a modest laptop could have the game’s sumptuous take on the Peloponnesian War piped to it over the web.

Those initial trials are now finished. Microsoft, which makes the Xbox consoles, is due to start testing a similar service, Project xCloud, later this year. Amazon is...



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A Brazilian tragedy is a Deepwater Horizon moment. Sort of

FROM THE air, the iron-ore mines in Minas Gerais look like roughshod capitalism let loose. Mines are torn out of the landscape, and ramshackle mining towns exist perilously close by. Squeezed within the dense topography are tailings dams, pools of waste material extracted from the mine that sit behind pharaonic embankments reaching dozens of storeys high. On January 25th an 86-metre-tall one owned by Vale, the world’s biggest iron-ore producer, breached, unleashing a wave of sludge that may have killed more than 350 people. They included hundreds of the company’s own employees, many of them having lunch in the cafeteria, recklessly sited below.

Such a death toll would make this one of the worst tailings tragedies in history; worse for instance than Aberfan in Wales in 1966, or Buffalo Creek, West Virginia in 1972. Even more damaging for Vale, this is the second such disaster in which it is implicated in just over three years. For...



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The 15 Best Business Podcasts Right Now

The 15 Best Business Podcasts Right Now

Did you know a staggering 44% of the U.S. population has listened to a podcast and an incredible 40 million people tune into podcasts for education, entertainment and inspiration every week?

We cannot ignore the fact that podcasts are becoming an increasingly popular and prevalent way to be informed about the latest business and industry tips, trends and updates.

In short, if you’re a business owner or entrepreneur and you’ve yet to jump on the podcast phenomenon, you could be seriously missing out on having easy access to this exciting information and communication medium.

Best Business Podcasts

If you’re unsure which podcasts to listen to, take a look at the following best 15 business podcasts that U.S. listeners can get right now.

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Entrepreneurs on Fire is an award-winning podcast that was founded and presented by John Lee Dumas. The podcast features John interviewing inspiring entrepreneurs to help aspiring entrepreneurs achieve a seamless journey to business success.

The Art of Hustle

The Art of Hustle podcast is co-produced by WeWork and iHeartRadio as an informative platform for entrepreneurs and marketers. This popular business podcast was founded by Anthem Salgado, a small business coach and marketing specialist. Each episode provides business advice and training designed to “untangle your to-do list and clear a pathway for new forward movement.”

Rise and Grind

Rise and Grind is hosted by Shark Tank presenter Daymond John, one of the most prominent names in America’s business landscape today. Each podcast sees John interview leading business figures on issues related to productivity, power and performance.

Indie Hackers

Enjoy listening to raw and unscripted conversations with the founders of profitable online business on the Indie Hackers podcast. Host Courtland Allen interviews successful online business founders to find out how they have successfully marketing and grown their online business.

Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee is an informative podcast which is recorded each week from a coffee shop by hosts Christopher Penn and John Wall. The podcast is designed to help small businesses with marketing, providing them with tips on the likes of social media, copywriting, SEO, affiliate marketing and more.

Foundr Podcast

Nathan Chan hosts the Foundr Podcast, designed to help small business owners and entrepreneurs learn from the greatest minds in business today. This leading business podcast is hailed as the “go-to digital resource for the growing ranks of craft, self-made entrepreneurs – at every level of experience.”

Business Wars

The Business Wars podcast dissects and analyses stories behind brands and their leaders. It looks at the inspiration and challenges some of the world’s biggest brands have been up against, such as Nike, Netflix and Adidas. Insight into inspiring real-life business stories is presented by David Brown, former anchor of Marketplace.

Hack to Start

Hack to Start is devoted to telling the stories of interesting people and the innovative ways they have achieved success. Each week co-hosts Franco Varriano and Tyler Copeland speak with a new guest about how they “created, hacked and hustled their way to the top.”

Mixergy

Mixery is a popular business podcast hosted by successful business owner and entrepreneur Andrew Warner. Each episode focuses on different aspects of running a business, from starting a venture to finding a sustainable, purpose-built business. Each episode features a successful and inspiring entrepreneur.

Startups for the Rest of Us

Startups for the Rest of Us is an extremely useful business podcast that helps entrepreneurs, developers and designers improve the way the launch software products. This popular podcast is hosted by the experienced web app professional and author Rob Walling and programmer analyst Mike Taber.

Hack the Entrepreneur

Hack the Entrepreneur is an entrepreneur podcast for anyone looking to develop their entrepreneurial mindset. Hosted by Jon Nastor, the podcast explores the struggles, fears and habits of small business owners to help entrepreneurs find success.

Demand Gen Chat

Host Emil Shour helps B2B marketers generate more leads and revenue on the Demand Gen Chat podcast. Each episode records a candid interview with an expert in B2B marketing, exploring different topics like SEO, advertising and career growth.

Inside LaunchStreet

Inside LaunchStreet examines the whole picture involved in setting up, running and growing a business. Each episode sees an inspiring figure in the world of business and marketing provide insight on how to successful run a business. Listeners benefit from actionable takeaways at the end of each episode. Inside LaunchStreet is hosted by Tamara Ghandour, founder of the thriving online education and business community platform, GoToLaunchStreet.com.

The Marketing Companion

Claiming to be the “world’s most entertaining podcast”, the Marketing Companion is a useful tool for businesses wanting to improve their marketing capabilities. Hosted by the globally-recognized marketing author, consultant and blogger Mark Schaefer, alongside the pithy research and raconteur Tom Webster, the Marketing Companion provides fun, witty and unique insight into all aspects of marketing.

StartUp

Described as arguably the number one podcast in the world today, StartUp looks at what it is really like to start and launch a startup. The podcast features professionals within the business world. This popular business podcast is hosted by Alex Blumberg and Lisa Chow.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "The 15 Best Business Podcasts Right Now" was first published on Small Business Trends



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The 15 Best Business Podcasts Right Now

The 15 Best Business Podcasts Right Now

Did you know a staggering 44% of the U.S. population has listened to a podcast and an incredible 40 million people tune into podcasts for education, entertainment and inspiration every week?

We cannot ignore the fact that podcasts are becoming an increasingly popular and prevalent way to be informed about the latest business and industry tips, trends and updates.

In short, if you’re a business owner or entrepreneur and you’ve yet to jump on the podcast phenomenon, you could be seriously missing out on having easy access to this exciting information and communication medium.

Best Business Podcasts

If you’re unsure which podcasts to listen to, take a look at the following best 15 business podcasts that U.S. listeners can get right now.

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Entrepreneurs on Fire is an award-winning podcast that was founded and presented by John Lee Dumas. The podcast features John interviewing inspiring entrepreneurs to help aspiring entrepreneurs achieve a seamless journey to business success.

The Art of Hustle

The Art of Hustle podcast is co-produced by WeWork and iHeartRadio as an informative platform for entrepreneurs and marketers. This popular business podcast was founded by Anthem Salgado, a small business coach and marketing specialist. Each episode provides business advice and training designed to “untangle your to-do list and clear a pathway for new forward movement.”

Rise and Grind

Rise and Grind is hosted by Shark Tank presenter Daymond John, one of the most prominent names in America’s business landscape today. Each podcast sees John interview leading business figures on issues related to productivity, power and performance.

Indie Hackers

Enjoy listening to raw and unscripted conversations with the founders of profitable online business on the Indie Hackers podcast. Host Courtland Allen interviews successful online business founders to find out how they have successfully marketing and grown their online business.

Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee is an informative podcast which is recorded each week from a coffee shop by hosts Christopher Penn and John Wall. The podcast is designed to help small businesses with marketing, providing them with tips on the likes of social media, copywriting, SEO, affiliate marketing and more.

Foundr Podcast

Nathan Chan hosts the Foundr Podcast, designed to help small business owners and entrepreneurs learn from the greatest minds in business today. This leading business podcast is hailed as the “go-to digital resource for the growing ranks of craft, self-made entrepreneurs – at every level of experience.”

Business Wars

The Business Wars podcast dissects and analyses stories behind brands and their leaders. It looks at the inspiration and challenges some of the world’s biggest brands have been up against, such as Nike, Netflix and Adidas. Insight into inspiring real-life business stories is presented by David Brown, former anchor of Marketplace.

Hack to Start

Hack to Start is devoted to telling the stories of interesting people and the innovative ways they have achieved success. Each week co-hosts Franco Varriano and Tyler Copeland speak with a new guest about how they “created, hacked and hustled their way to the top.”

Mixergy

Mixery is a popular business podcast hosted by successful business owner and entrepreneur Andrew Warner. Each episode focuses on different aspects of running a business, from starting a venture to finding a sustainable, purpose-built business. Each episode features a successful and inspiring entrepreneur.

Startups for the Rest of Us

Startups for the Rest of Us is an extremely useful business podcast that helps entrepreneurs, developers and designers improve the way the launch software products. This popular podcast is hosted by the experienced web app professional and author Rob Walling and programmer analyst Mike Taber.

Hack the Entrepreneur

Hack the Entrepreneur is an entrepreneur podcast for anyone looking to develop their entrepreneurial mindset. Hosted by Jon Nastor, the podcast explores the struggles, fears and habits of small business owners to help entrepreneurs find success.

Demand Gen Chat

Host Emil Shour helps B2B marketers generate more leads and revenue on the Demand Gen Chat podcast. Each episode records a candid interview with an expert in B2B marketing, exploring different topics like SEO, advertising and career growth.

Inside LaunchStreet

Inside LaunchStreet examines the whole picture involved in setting up, running and growing a business. Each episode sees an inspiring figure in the world of business and marketing provide insight on how to successful run a business. Listeners benefit from actionable takeaways at the end of each episode. Inside LaunchStreet is hosted by Tamara Ghandour, founder of the thriving online education and business community platform, GoToLaunchStreet.com.

The Marketing Companion

Claiming to be the “world’s most entertaining podcast”, the Marketing Companion is a useful tool for businesses wanting to improve their marketing capabilities. Hosted by the globally-recognized marketing author, consultant and blogger Mark Schaefer, alongside the pithy research and raconteur Tom Webster, the Marketing Companion provides fun, witty and unique insight into all aspects of marketing.

StartUp

Described as arguably the number one podcast in the world today, StartUp looks at what it is really like to start and launch a startup. The podcast features professionals within the business world. This popular business podcast is hosted by Alex Blumberg and Lisa Chow.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "The 15 Best Business Podcasts Right Now" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Master the Art of Boosting Your Traffic with These 4 Tools from Google AdSense

How to Increase Traffic Using Google AdSense

Just like the number of people who walk in your brick and mortar store, the amount of traffic you get on your website will dictate the success of your business.

A new infographic released by Google AdSense lists four valuable tools you can use to get the most out of your website with the goal of increasing the traffic. Although AdSense is known for monetizing your site more effectively, it also has a suite of tools to help you increase traffic and reach more of your potential customer base.

How to Increase Traffic Using Google AdSense

For small businesses with a digital presence, optimizing the monetization and traffic of a website is absolutely essential. Google wants to help your site by sharing important tips on how to boost and optimize your web site with Google AdSense tools.

Google Search

It all starts with the range of Google Search console tools to improve the performance of your digital presence online.

According to Google, you should submit your page to the Google index to see how the search engine views your site. This will diagnose any potential problems so the crawler can gain access for optimizing your ads.

You can then use Search Analytics to see the queries which are bringing more visitors to your site.

Traffic Analysis

According to Google, boosting the traffic of your site requires you to analyze, optimize and gain visibility.

With this analysis, you can determine who your audience is so you can tailor the content and ads on your site accordingly. Once you have figured this out, you need to optimize your website so it works seamlessly on all platforms.

This is followed by implementing solutions which allow you to gain the visibility of your site to rank high in searches.

With Google Analytics, you can track and monitor who is visiting your site and when. Based on this information, you can further optimize and customize the content and even the products and services you offer.

Additional tools include Google Trends to see what everyone is searching for, Market Finder to find new promotional opportunities, Consumer Barometer to determine just how people are using the internet, New Consumer insights for segmenting audiences with data, analytics and insights, and  Success Stories for getting valuable tips and tricks from the community of users.

Channel Customisation

After you understand what your audience is looking for, the next step is to customize your channels. This will further optimize your site in order to reach your users.

Google says you need to review its new traffic acquisition tips and create up to 2,000 channels to optimize the performance of your ad units.

With the custom channels in place, it is time to turn them into targetable ad placements so advertisers can choose to display their ads.

During the optimization process, Google recommends you follow the Google AdSense Program policies and Webmaster Quality Guidelines.

Mobile Optimization

Mobile has surpassed desktop traffic. If your digital assets are not optimized for mobile traffic you are greatly limiting the number of users who will visit your site.

Whether you built your site yourself or you had a developer do it, make sure it is optimized for mobile. This will make it much faster to load and format on mobile devices to improve the user experience.

Google also recommends to start building AMP versions of your site, test your site to ensure it is operating efficiently on mobile, compare the speeds of other publishers with your site, and more.

How to Increase Traffic Using Google AdSense

Image: Google

This article, "Master the Art of Boosting Your Traffic with These 4 Tools from Google AdSense" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Master the Art of Boosting Your Traffic with These 4 Tools from Google AdSense

How to Increase Traffic Using Google AdSense

Just like the number of people who walk in your brick and mortar store, the amount of traffic you get on your website will dictate the success of your business.

A new infographic released by Google AdSense lists four valuable tools you can use to get the most out of your website with the goal of increasing the traffic. Although AdSense is known for monetizing your site more effectively, it also has a suite of tools to help you increase traffic and reach more of your potential customer base.

How to Increase Traffic Using Google AdSense

For small businesses with a digital presence, optimizing the monetization and traffic of a website is absolutely essential. Google wants to help your site by sharing important tips on how to boost and optimize your web site with Google AdSense tools.

Google Search

It all starts with the range of Google Search console tools to improve the performance of your digital presence online.

According to Google, you should submit your page to the Google index to see how the search engine views your site. This will diagnose any potential problems so the crawler can gain access for optimizing your ads.

You can then use Search Analytics to see the queries which are bringing more visitors to your site.

Traffic Analysis

According to Google, boosting the traffic of your site requires you to analyze, optimize and gain visibility.

With this analysis, you can determine who your audience is so you can tailor the content and ads on your site accordingly. Once you have figured this out, you need to optimize your website so it works seamlessly on all platforms.

This is followed by implementing solutions which allow you to gain the visibility of your site to rank high in searches.

With Google Analytics, you can track and monitor who is visiting your site and when. Based on this information, you can further optimize and customize the content and even the products and services you offer.

Additional tools include Google Trends to see what everyone is searching for, Market Finder to find new promotional opportunities, Consumer Barometer to determine just how people are using the internet, New Consumer insights for segmenting audiences with data, analytics and insights, and  Success Stories for getting valuable tips and tricks from the community of users.

Channel Customisation

After you understand what your audience is looking for, the next step is to customize your channels. This will further optimize your site in order to reach your users.

Google says you need to review its new traffic acquisition tips and create up to 2,000 channels to optimize the performance of your ad units.

With the custom channels in place, it is time to turn them into targetable ad placements so advertisers can choose to display their ads.

During the optimization process, Google recommends you follow the Google AdSense Program policies and Webmaster Quality Guidelines.

Mobile Optimization

Mobile has surpassed desktop traffic. If your digital assets are not optimized for mobile traffic you are greatly limiting the number of users who will visit your site.

Whether you built your site yourself or you had a developer do it, make sure it is optimized for mobile. This will make it much faster to load and format on mobile devices to improve the user experience.

Google also recommends to start building AMP versions of your site, test your site to ensure it is operating efficiently on mobile, compare the speeds of other publishers with your site, and more.

How to Increase Traffic Using Google AdSense

Image: Google

This article, "Master the Art of Boosting Your Traffic with These 4 Tools from Google AdSense" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Italy’s slump reflects trouble both at home and abroad

ITALY BOASTS no glittering economic record. GDP growth has trailed the euro-area average every year since 1999. Despite a decent showing in 2016-17, the economy has yet to regain fully the output lost during the global crisis a decade ago and a domestic banking scare a few years later.

Now even its modest recovery seems to have gone into reverse. Figures published on January 31st showed that Italy slipped into recession in the second half of 2018. The economy shrank by 0.2% in the final quarter of 2018, its second consecutive contraction (see chart). The causes are both domestic and external. They seem likely to depress the economy this year, too, and to worsen an already fraught fiscal position.

The euro zone—notably Germany—has lost momentum as global trade has slowed. Italy has not been immune. Exports rose by nearly 6% in 2017, but Loredana Federico of UniCredit, a bank, reckons they probably grew by just 1% last year. Giada Giani...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Hyperinflations can end quickly, given the right sort of regime change

BANKNOTES USED as toilet paper. Wheelbarrows of cash exchanged for a loaf of bread. Prices in supermarkets revised upwards each hour. These vignettes of hyperinflation would be funny if they did not cause such hardship. This is now Venezuela’s situation, in what may be the final days of the ill-starred regime of Nicolás Maduro. An estimate by Steve Hanke of Johns Hopkins University put the country’s inflation rate last year at 100,000%, with prices doubling roughly once a month. The IMF reckons that in 2019 it may reach 10,000,000%.

Hyperinflations are not an exclusively modern problem. Rome suffered one under the emperor Diocletian. But the spread of fiat currencies, backed by the credibility of a government rather than a physical commodity such as gold, has made them more common. They came in devastating bursts over the past century: in the aftermath of the first and second world wars, during the post-Soviet transition from communism to capitalism, and more recently in misgoverned poor countries, mostly in Africa and Latin America. They are not cases of garden-variety inflation run amok. Rather, they demonstrate a catastrophic breakdown in a state’s capacity to govern. In a narrow sense, they are a monetary phenomenon, with printing presses running nonstop. Yet the...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

A new initiative aims to modernise global trading rules

“SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!” promises the seller of “The Law and Policy of the World Trade Organisation” (WTO). The magic of e-commerce means that the doorstopper can be exported from America to Tajikistan for a cool $35.95 (plus shipping). A new initiative on digital trade at the WTO strives to add to the laws and policies described within its pages. But far from increasing general satisfaction, this plan is controversial.

At first glance, it is hard to see why. On January 25th representatives of 76 WTO members gathered at the annual shindig in Davos announced plans to negotiate new rules covering “trade-related aspects of electronic commerce”. Compared with the trade talks between America and China that restarted this week in Washington, this venture seems positively collegial. It makes sense: trade rules were written when cloud computing was the stuff of science fiction. What better way to demonstrate the value of the WTO, just as President Donald Trump is busy undermining it?

But a closer look reveals conflict. Though the 76 members account for 90% of global trade, they are a minority of WTO members. Many developing countries claim that tighter e-commerce rules would tie national regulators’ hands and that the issue is a distraction from others they care about more, such as limiting rich countries’ agricultural...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Hyperinflations can end quickly, given the right sort of regime change

BANKNOTES USED as toilet paper. Wheelbarrows of cash exchanged for a loaf of bread. Prices in supermarkets revised upwards each hour. These vignettes of hyperinflation would be funny if they did not cause such hardship. This is now Venezuela’s situation, in what may be the final days of the ill-starred regime of Nicolás Maduro. An estimate by Steve Hanke of Johns Hopkins University put the country’s inflation rate last year at 100,000%, with prices doubling roughly once a month. The IMF reckons that in 2019 it may reach 10,000,000%.

Hyperinflations are not an exclusively modern problem. Rome suffered one under the emperor Diocletian. But the spread of fiat currencies, backed by the credibility of a government rather than a physical commodity such as gold, has made them more common. They came in devastating bursts over the past century: in the aftermath of the first and second world wars, during the post-Soviet transition from communism to capitalism, and more recently in misgoverned poor countries, mostly in Africa and Latin America. They are not cases of garden-variety inflation run amok. Rather, they demonstrate a catastrophic breakdown in a state’s capacity to govern. In a narrow sense, they are a monetary phenomenon, with printing presses running nonstop. Yet the important question for economists, and for those trying to end them...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

The two tribes of working life

PERHAPS THEY are two of the most welcome words in the English language: “Meeting cancelled”. When they cropped up in Bartleby’s message the other day, he experienced a brief moment of elation. In truth, the meeting turned out only to be postponed for two weeks, but procrastination is an underappreciated pleasure.

Workers, and possibly all people, can be divided into two groups. Those who like to be involved in everything and can be dubbed “FOMOs” because they suffer from a “fear of missing out”. And then there are those who would ideally want to be left to get on with their own particular work, without distraction—the “JOMOs” (joy of missing out).

When The Economist moved offices in London in 2017, the new building came with a set of meeting spaces. As was inevitable, there are a lot more meetings. It is hard to walk by these gatherings without wondering who these people are and what they are doing. (It mostly seems to involve them gazing earnestly at a projection of a computer screen). Never once has Bartleby, who was born under the sign of JOMO, wanted to join one of the groups.

Readers will instantly know their tribe. If the boss announces a new project, do you immediately volunteer, thinking this will be a great chance to prove your skills? If so, you are a FOMO. Or do you foresee the...



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America unseals its indictment against Huawei

IN A CIVIL lawsuit in 2017 an employee of Huawei, a Chinese telecoms giant, was found to have swiped one of the arms of Tappy, a phone-testing robot owned by T-Mobile, an American wireless carrier, and with it the smart proprietary technology in its fingertip. A jury in Seattle ordered Huawei to pay compensation of $4.8m to T-Mobile. The court found, however, “neither damage, unjust enrichment nor wilful and malicious conduct by Huawei”.

This week the Chinese company reminded the world of that verdict in its public response to a sweeping set of fresh allegations against it by America’s Department of Justice. The charges include obstruction of justice—and technology theft, as Tappy becomes the subject of a new criminal case. Huawei was also accused of defrauding four big banks (one of which is known to be HSBC) into clearing transactions that violated international sanctions on Iran. This was why Canadian police arrested Meng Wanzhou, the company’s chief financial officer, on December 1st, on behalf of the American authorities. On January 28th they made a formal request for her extradition. Canada now has 30 days to respond.

Huawei said that it had not committed “any of the asserted violations” and repeated that it was “not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms Meng”. Among the charges unsealed thus far, Tappy is the only direct...



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Boost Your Professional Skills with Cilantro, Selling, and Social Media

This week, we had a flavorful collection of tools, tips, and techniques that will enhance your skills as a professional...

The post Boost Your Professional Skills with Cilantro, Selling, and Social Media appeared first on Copyblogger.



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25 Signs of a Shoplifter in Your Store

25 Signs of a Shoplifter in Your Store

Retail businesses lose nearly $50 billion per year due to shoplifting and similar types of theft. Though you may not be able to eliminate theft completely, you can dramatically reduce the impact by knowing the signs and training your employees to be on the lookout.

Signs of a Shoplifter

Shoplifters can be any age, race, gender and social class. So you have to go beyond the basics and look for specific mannerisms and signs to minimize the effects of shoplifting on your business. Here are some of the top things to look for.

Familiar Faces

Shoplifters certainly don’t all fit into one category. But you may already be aware of some specific individuals who have shoplifted or tried shoplifting from your store. If you’ve caught someone, you can ask them not to return to your store. If you’re just suspicious of a frequent visitor, you might increase security measures or keep a closer eye on them.

In fact, new security systems that use facial recognition technology could help you identify previous shoplifters. According to Daniel Putterman, CEO of computer vision security provider Kogniz, his company’s system allows you to add a photo of a previous offender so you can get alerts if and when they try to enter your store again.

Frequent Visits

Kogniz is also capable of detecting unusual activity like an individual walking around your store multiple times. Even without such a security system, be on the lookout for people who visit your store regularly but don’t make purchases, or those who walk past your store multiple time while looking inside.

Oversized Clothing or Bags

Shoplifters often carry large purses or backpacks where they can easily conceal the items they steal. Or they might wear oversized clothing that could easily fit items inside. Of course, there are other reasons to carry purses or wear large coats, but it’s worth keeping an eye on anyone with a large, open bag.

Winter Gear in Summer

Jackets or large scarves can also be quite effective when attempting to conceal stolen goods. Of course, most people are likely to be wearing these items in the winter. But they should probably raise some red flags on warmer days.

Lumps in Clothing

Since there are plenty of legitimate reasons for people to wear jackets or oversized sweaters, you should also look out for additional signs. This could include awkward lumps under jackets, where the offender may be holding their stolen items.

Split-up Groups

Shoplifters often work in groups. To avoid drawing attention to themselves, they may split up so one can steal while the other distracts employees. Or they could simply take different parts of the store.

Distracting Staff Members

In fact, any sort of distraction or diversion may be a sign of a shoplifter. If anyone asks excessive questions or needs help in one specific part of the store, you may want to pay special attention.

Asking for Out-of-Stock Items

One common method for shoplifters to distract staff members is to ask for items that are not available in the main part of the store. If they can get you to go check the back stockroom, they can easily grab something and make their getaway.

Constantly Monitoring Employees

Shoplifters tend to pay more attention to employees than to the actual products in the store. If you notice someone looking at you constantly, you may want to pay special attention.

Examining Multiple Items

Shoplifters will often pick up items throughout the store and examine them so it won’t seem strange when they pick up an item to steal. This can also be a tactic to throw you off the scent, since you won’t necessarily know exactly what item was stolen.

Excessive Sweating

According to Dr. Lillian Glass, body language expert and author of “The Body Language of Liars,” excessive sweating, especially on the T-zone of the face, is common for those who are being deceptive. Of course, there are other reasons for excessive sweat, but it may be worth keeping an eye on someone who is especially flushed on a cold day.

Lack of Eye Contact

Those who are being deceptive also may have a difficult time making eye contact with people when they’re questioned. It’s not always a surefire sign of shoplifting, but may be something to look out for.

Looking Around Constantly

Shoplifters will also want to be sure that they’re not being watched when they actually go to steal something. If you notice someone with a swivel head, pay special attention.

Fidgeting

Fidgeting is another sign of nervous behavior. Be on the lookout for excessive scratching, face touching, or hair pulling.

Nervous Behavior When Questioned

A study from UCLA found that people who are lying tend to give short responses, over-justify their behavior and repeat questions when they’re approached by another person. If you believe someone may be shoplifting, simply asking if they need help with anything could give you clues about their intent.

Noticing Security Cameras

If you do have security cameras around your store, shoplifters are likely to take notice. They may also try to avoid those parts of your store and focus on back corners or areas that aren’t well monitored.

Loitering in One Spot

Shoplifters also tend to stand around for awhile in one particular part of the store. Pay attention to anyone spending an unusual amount of time in a back corner.

Filling Changing Rooms

In clothing stores, it’s common for shoplifters to take multiple items into a changing room so they can conceal items under their clothing without detection.

Multiple Guests in Changing Rooms

You should also be wary of groups entering changing rooms. They may be working together or trying to create some confusion among the staff.

Atypical Customers

Shoplifters do not have one specific profile. But your small business probably has a pretty consistent target customer. Those who don’t seem like your regular customers may be a bit more likely to shoplift.

Carrying Multiple Items

It is also common for shoplifters to carry around large piles of items so it won’t seem as unusual if one or two of them goes missing. In fact, some shoplifters may even purchase multiple items while also sneaking extras out of the store with them.

Shopping During Off-Hours

Shoplifters do not normally like to take things when there are a lot of people around. Even if staff members are busy, other shoppers may notice something. So pay special attention during slow times.

Loose Price Tags

Not all shoplifters simply take things without paying. Some may try softer tactics like switching price tags so they end up getting a very expensive item at a much lower price. Be on the lookout for any price tags that look like they were placed on a product haphazardly. And check prices on items that don’t have price tags at all.

Obstructed Faces

To avoid being identified, some shoplifters will wear hats, scarves, or sunglasses that cover up parts of their face.

Quick Exits

Once a shoplifter has grabbed their items, they are likely to try and make a fairly quick exit. They won’t necessarily bolt out of the store, though that should raise some red flags as well. But they may walk a little more briskly than other customers. So it could be worth checking security footage.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "25 Signs of a Shoplifter in Your Store" was first published on Small Business Trends



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25 Signs of a Shoplifter in Your Store

25 Signs of a Shoplifter in Your Store

Retail businesses lose nearly $50 billion per year due to shoplifting and similar types of theft. Though you may not be able to eliminate theft completely, you can dramatically reduce the impact by knowing the signs and training your employees to be on the lookout.

Signs of a Shoplifter

Shoplifters can be any age, race, gender and social class. So you have to go beyond the basics and look for specific mannerisms and signs to minimize the effects of shoplifting on your business. Here are some of the top things to look for.

Familiar Faces

Shoplifters certainly don’t all fit into one category. But you may already be aware of some specific individuals who have shoplifted or tried shoplifting from your store. If you’ve caught someone, you can ask them not to return to your store. If you’re just suspicious of a frequent visitor, you might increase security measures or keep a closer eye on them.

In fact, new security systems that use facial recognition technology could help you identify previous shoplifters. According to Daniel Putterman, CEO of computer vision security provider Kogniz, his company’s system allows you to add a photo of a previous offender so you can get alerts if and when they try to enter your store again.

Frequent Visits

Kogniz is also capable of detecting unusual activity like an individual walking around your store multiple times. Even without such a security system, be on the lookout for people who visit your store regularly but don’t make purchases, or those who walk past your store multiple time while looking inside.

Oversized Clothing or Bags

Shoplifters often carry large purses or backpacks where they can easily conceal the items they steal. Or they might wear oversized clothing that could easily fit items inside. Of course, there are other reasons to carry purses or wear large coats, but it’s worth keeping an eye on anyone with a large, open bag.

Winter Gear in Summer

Jackets or large scarves can also be quite effective when attempting to conceal stolen goods. Of course, most people are likely to be wearing these items in the winter. But they should probably raise some red flags on warmer days.

Lumps in Clothing

Since there are plenty of legitimate reasons for people to wear jackets or oversized sweaters, you should also look out for additional signs. This could include awkward lumps under jackets, where the offender may be holding their stolen items.

Split-up Groups

Shoplifters often work in groups. To avoid drawing attention to themselves, they may split up so one can steal while the other distracts employees. Or they could simply take different parts of the store.

Distracting Staff Members

In fact, any sort of distraction or diversion may be a sign of a shoplifter. If anyone asks excessive questions or needs help in one specific part of the store, you may want to pay special attention.

Asking for Out-of-Stock Items

One common method for shoplifters to distract staff members is to ask for items that are not available in the main part of the store. If they can get you to go check the back stockroom, they can easily grab something and make their getaway.

Constantly Monitoring Employees

Shoplifters tend to pay more attention to employees than to the actual products in the store. If you notice someone looking at you constantly, you may want to pay special attention.

Examining Multiple Items

Shoplifters will often pick up items throughout the store and examine them so it won’t seem strange when they pick up an item to steal. This can also be a tactic to throw you off the scent, since you won’t necessarily know exactly what item was stolen.

Excessive Sweating

According to Dr. Lillian Glass, body language expert and author of “The Body Language of Liars,” excessive sweating, especially on the T-zone of the face, is common for those who are being deceptive. Of course, there are other reasons for excessive sweat, but it may be worth keeping an eye on someone who is especially flushed on a cold day.

Lack of Eye Contact

Those who are being deceptive also may have a difficult time making eye contact with people when they’re questioned. It’s not always a surefire sign of shoplifting, but may be something to look out for.

Looking Around Constantly

Shoplifters will also want to be sure that they’re not being watched when they actually go to steal something. If you notice someone with a swivel head, pay special attention.

Fidgeting

Fidgeting is another sign of nervous behavior. Be on the lookout for excessive scratching, face touching, or hair pulling.

Nervous Behavior When Questioned

A study from UCLA found that people who are lying tend to give short responses, over-justify their behavior and repeat questions when they’re approached by another person. If you believe someone may be shoplifting, simply asking if they need help with anything could give you clues about their intent.

Noticing Security Cameras

If you do have security cameras around your store, shoplifters are likely to take notice. They may also try to avoid those parts of your store and focus on back corners or areas that aren’t well monitored.

Loitering in One Spot

Shoplifters also tend to stand around for awhile in one particular part of the store. Pay attention to anyone spending an unusual amount of time in a back corner.

Filling Changing Rooms

In clothing stores, it’s common for shoplifters to take multiple items into a changing room so they can conceal items under their clothing without detection.

Multiple Guests in Changing Rooms

You should also be wary of groups entering changing rooms. They may be working together or trying to create some confusion among the staff.

Atypical Customers

Shoplifters do not have one specific profile. But your small business probably has a pretty consistent target customer. Those who don’t seem like your regular customers may be a bit more likely to shoplift.

Carrying Multiple Items

It is also common for shoplifters to carry around large piles of items so it won’t seem as unusual if one or two of them goes missing. In fact, some shoplifters may even purchase multiple items while also sneaking extras out of the store with them.

Shopping During Off-Hours

Shoplifters do not normally like to take things when there are a lot of people around. Even if staff members are busy, other shoppers may notice something. So pay special attention during slow times.

Loose Price Tags

Not all shoplifters simply take things without paying. Some may try softer tactics like switching price tags so they end up getting a very expensive item at a much lower price. Be on the lookout for any price tags that look like they were placed on a product haphazardly. And check prices on items that don’t have price tags at all.

Obstructed Faces

To avoid being identified, some shoplifters will wear hats, scarves, or sunglasses that cover up parts of their face.

Quick Exits

Once a shoplifter has grabbed their items, they are likely to try and make a fairly quick exit. They won’t necessarily bolt out of the store, though that should raise some red flags as well. But they may walk a little more briskly than other customers. So it could be worth checking security footage.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "25 Signs of a Shoplifter in Your Store" was first published on Small Business Trends



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