London’s reign as the world’s capital of capital is at risk

A WELL-KNOWN stockmarket sell signal is a company splurging on flashy new headquarters. It might then be time to go short the City of London. From the Shard, the tallest building in the European Union, the view is of a crowded skyline of fellow concept skyscrapers. There is the Gherkin, the Cheesegrater, the Walkie Talkie and, rising in their midst, 22 Bishopsgate, which will be the Square Mile’s tallest and most capacious tower. The building frenzy is even accelerating. Londoners are waiting to hear if the 1,000-foot Tulip—with a design that many contend is more phallic than floral—will be approved.

None of this suggests a financial centre bracing for Britain’s departure from the European Union. But as soon as Theresa May, the prime minister, made leaving the single market a “red line” after the Brexit referendum in 2016, it seemed likely that the City would be sundered from its biggest foreign market. Regulators on both sides of the Channel scrambled to ensure business continuity and financial stability. British firms were asked to draw up contingency plans, including opening hubs in the EU27 (the EU minus Britain). For much of the City, Brexit happened sometime last year. 

According to New Financial, a think-tank in London, 291 big financial firms have moved some activities or people to the EU27, or opened...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

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