The long-term decline in bond yields enters a new phase

AT THE END of 1989, an American in London received a call from a friend back home. The caller had watched the fall of the Berlin Wall and the toppling of Nicolae Ceausescu in Romania with growing dismay. He was at the end of a four-year course in Russian Studies at an elite university with hefty tuition fees. He had learned all the Kremlinology a would-be cold warrior could need—but not that the cold war might suddenly end. “I just took a $60,000 bath,” he said.

This story comes to mind not so much because of fears of a new cold war, this time with China, but because of the bond market’s recent response to such fears. Long-term interest rates have tumbled almost as swiftly as communism fell in Europe. The yield on a ten-year Treasury bond has plunged from 2.5% to 2.1% in the past month. Ten-year Bund yields have turned negative again and have reached a new all-time low.

What happens to long-term interest rates in large part reflects what is expected to happen to short-term rates. The bond market’s Kremlinologists expect the Federal Reserve to cut them soon. Other central banks will seek to keep money easy. One consequence is that the secular decline in real interest rates is unlikely to reverse soon (see chart). The implications are far-reaching: the whole edifice of asset prices is founded on a low-rate regime. But what if...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

0 nhận xét:

Post a Comment