America and China are sparring over subsidies

AS TRADE TALKS continue between America and China, old fights are rumbling on. On October 28th China asked the World Trade Organisation (WTO) to allow it to retaliate against $2.4bn of imports from America, as part of a long-running dispute over American treatment of Chinese exports. The final sum will be set by an arbitrator, and will be small in the broader context of the two countries’ escalating trade war. But the symbolism will make it sting.

The dispute concerns two of America’s biggest gripes: China’s economic model and the WTO’s inability to constrain it. America accuses China’s government of bloating its private sector with subsidies, which spill over to affect businesses abroad. If state-owned banks make cut-price loans, or state-owned electricity companies sell cheap energy, Chinese exporters have an unfair advantage, it says. By last year America had imposed tariffs on almost 7% of Chinese imports, citing such subsidies and the need to defend itself.

Americans argue that if Chinese state institutions hold a majority stake in a company, this strongly suggests it is a “public body” and therefore capable of giving subsidies. But the WTO’s appellate body has generally disagreed. It has also often backed China’s stance that America’s defensive duties are too harsh.

The United States Trade Representative,...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Why the repo market went awry…

ON SEPTEMBER 17TH, for the first time in a decade, the Federal Reserve intervened in the overnight repurchase, or “repo” market, where banks and hedge funds get short-term funding by swapping $1trn-2trn of Treasuries for cash each day. After the repo rate rose to 10%, the federal-funds rate, at which banks can borrow from each other, climbed above the Fed’s target (see chart). The Fed swooped in, offering $75bn-worth of overnight funding, and both rates came back down. But it has had to keep lending to stop them rising again. During October it said it would lend for longer periods, increased its limit on overnight repo operations to at least $120bn and started buying short-dated Treasuries directly, at a pace of $60bn per month.

The turmoil indicated an unexpected shortage of liquidity in the financial system. Before the financial crisis the Fed had controlled the federal-funds rate using a “corridor”, with a ceiling and floor. Banks could borrow at the ceiling rate, but the floor rate was zero, meaning cash held at the Fed earned nothing. To keep interest rates on-target the Fed used “open-market” operations, swapping Treasuries and cash.

...


via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

A scholar of inequality ponders the future of capitalism

WHEN COMMUNISM fell, that was supposed to be that. History would continue, but arguments about how to organise society seemed to have been settled. Yet even as capitalism has strengthened its hold on the global economy, history’s verdict has come to seem less final. In a new book, “Capitalism, Alone”, Branko Milanovic of the Stone Centre on Socioeconomic Inequality at the City University of New York argues that this unification of humankind under a single social system lends support to the view of history as a march towards progress. But the belief that liberal capitalism will prove to be the destination has been weakened by financial and political dysfunction in the rich world, and by the rise of China. Its triumph cannot be taken for granted.

Mr Milanovic outlines a taxonomy of capitalisms and traces their evolution from classical capitalism before 1914, through the social-democratic capitalism of the mid-20th century, to “liberal meritocratic capitalism” in much of the rich world, in particular America. He contrasts this with the “political capitalism” found in many emerging countries, with China as the exemplar. These two capitalistic forms now dominate the global landscape. Their co-evolution will shape world history for decades to come.

Liberal meritocratic capitalism is generally associated with liberal political...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

As profits dwindle, HSBC plans a radical overhaul

WHEN NOEL QUINN took over as interim chief executive of HSBC from John Flint, ousted by the board in August, analysts expected a change in style. Whereas Mr Flint was seen as a cerebral introvert, Mr Quinn is forthcoming, verging on blunt.

On that front, at least, HSBC’s first quarterly-results announcement on his watch did not disappoint. Although its Asian business “held up well in a challenging environment”, performance in other areas was “not acceptable”, Mr Quinn said on October 28th. Third-quarter net profits, down by 24% on the same period last year, to $3bn, undershot pundits’ forecasts by 14%. Revenues fell by 3.2%, to $13.4bn, missing expectations by 3%. Return on tangible equity (ROTE), its chief measure of profitability, reached 6.4%, compared with analysts’ forecast of 9.5%. Investors agreed with Mr Quinn: the bank’s shares dropped by 4.3% on the news in London. They have fallen by about 11% in the past six months.

HSBC’s woes can be blamed in part on broader conditions: low interest rates, a slowing global economy, business uncertainty in Brexit-hit Britain and trade tensions (HSBC is the world’s largest provider of trade finance). Yet that is hardly likely to reassure investors. Tom Rayner of Numis Securities, a broker, points out that although some of these trends may be reversed, others, such as Brexit...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Capital is flooding into Silicon Valley

DEALMAKERS ARE smooth talkers. They need to be. But which branch of finance has the slickest ones? Consider the polished, public-school manner of the City investment banker—or the high-velocity spiel of the Wall Street bank boss. Both have a strong claim. But the venture capitalists, or VCs, of Silicon Valley have a stronger one. They spend their time either being pitched to by, or pitching on behalf of, entrepreneurs who hope to be the next Zuck or Larry-and-Sergey. Peddlers of such extravagant dreams have to have silver tongues.

They certainly have some catchy phrases. They speak of “vanity metrics” (misleading measures of a startup’s progress); of the importance of “product-market fit” (how well a piece of software meets the customer’s needs); and “deal heat”, the fever that causes investors to overpay. After a while even a normally buttoned-up Buttonwood is asking to “double-click” on a topic when he wants more detail from a voluble VC.

A subject guaranteed to get them talking is the flood of capital into Silicon Valley. In the popular metaphor, the VC business used to consist of a flotilla of small boats fishing in a well-stocked lake. It was all very collegial. Now the lake is an ocean. Trawlers are out there—big institutions, such as sovereign-wealth funds and pension-fund managers, that increasingly invest...



via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

Inflation in Turkey has fallen steeply

TURKEY’S PRESIDENT, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, once called high interest rates “the mother of all evil”. Murat Uysal, its new central-bank governor, must then be close to angelic. Since Mr Erdogan sacked Mr Uysal’s predecessor four months ago for refusing to slash interest rates, he has cut three times, by a cumulative ten percentage points (see chart 1). The latest cut, of 2.5 percentage points on October 24th, was more than double market expectations.

After last year’s aggressive tightening, easing now makes some sense. Inflation is back in single digits, after passing 25% last autumn. The lira has partially recovered from a battering that had pushed domestic prices up. In early October America threatened sanctions in response to Turkey’s offensive in Syria. The lira slumped, but after America brokered a ceasefire deal on October 17th, it steadied again. It strengthened further when Turkey’s and Russia’s presidents signed a similar agreement. That gave the bank room for the most recent cut.

...


via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

China’s median age will soon overtake America’s

SHORTLY AFTER 9am the neighbourhood care centre for the elderly shuffles to life. One man belts out a folk song. A centenarian sits by his Chinese chessboard, awaiting an opponent. A virtual-reality machine, which lets users experience such exotic adventures as grocery shopping and taking the subway, sits unused in the corner. A bigger attraction is the morning exercise routine—a couple of dozen people limbering up their creaky joints. They are the leading edge of China’s rapid ageing, a trend that is already starting to constrain its economic potential.

Since the care centre opened half a year ago in Changning, in central Shanghai, more than 12,000 elderly people from the area have passed through its doors. The city launched these centres in 2014, combining health clinics, drop-in facilities and old-people’s homes. It plans to have 400 by 2022. “We can’t wait. We’ve got to do everything in our ability to build these now,” says Peng Yanli, a community organiser.

...

via The Economist: Finance and economics Business Feeds

American business schools are reinventing the MBA

ON A VISIT to New York in October Marc Benioff, boss of Salesforce, compared Facebook to cigarettes and backed a corporate tax hike to deal with homelessness in San Francisco. If badmouthing a fellow technology giant and cheering the taxman were not heterodox enough for a billionaire entrepreneur, Mr Benioff laid into American management education. It “programmes” students to favour profit over the public good. This, he noted, is out of step with “the new capitalism”.

Many deans concur. “We need our students to be thoughtful about the role of business in society, particularly at a moment in time when capitalism is coming under attack,” says William Boulding of Duke’s Fuqua School of Business. Nitin Nohria of Harvard Business School (HBS) reports how younger alumni and incoming classes want “the place of work to reflect purpose and values”. Jonathan Levin of Stanford’s Graduate School of Business (GSB) talks of business schools’ responsibility to recognise the societal consequences of corporate actions. “Corporations, their leaders and owners need to act to restore trust,” he intones.

America’s business schools still dominate our annual ranking of the world’s top MBAs (see table). But the industry is being shaken up. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), an industry association, American MBA...



via Business Feeds

How Silicon Valley woos Stanford students

CONGRATULATIONS, YOU got into Stanford University. You beat 22 other candidates vying for each coveted place. For you, competition doesn’t quite stop there: being best in class boosts your prospects. But the real fighting now will be over 7,100 undergraduates and 9,400 graduate students, not between them. Technology giants and sexy startups all want this brainpower. So do venture capital (VC) funds. All go to sometimes absurd lengths to get it.

Accelerator programmes, such as StartX or Alchemist Accelerator, court budding entrepreneurs with burritos, desk space and thousands of dollars in earliest-stage funding. They hope to ferret out the next HP, Cisco, Google, PayPal, Netflix or other tech success story that can trace its roots to Stanford’s campus in sleepy Palo Alto, Silicon Valley’s spiritual epicentre.

To beat others to top talent, some deep-pocketed investors take on teaching appointments. Venture capitalists from Floodgate teach a course in how to evaluate startups. Many wannabe founders attend—and are evaluated in turn. Those who sparkle in final exams, which look a lot like startup pitch days, are invited to meet investors. Many such meetings turn into funding rounds (see Buttonwood). One student recounts how a Silicon Valley luminary who...



via Business Feeds

AMD, a chipmaking underdog, is having its day

DAVID, HE OF the spat with Goliath, is an overused corporate analogy. But it is hard to think of a more appropriate one for Advanced Micro Devices (AMD). On October 29th the American chipmaking tiddler reported its third-quarter results. Lisa Su, its boss, declared herself “extremely pleased”. No wonder. At $1.8bn, revenue was the highest since 2005. AMD predicted that next quarter’s figures would be equally perky, up 48% on the previous year to $2.1bn. Its share price has risen 15-fold since 2015 (see chart).

AMD is more important to the chip business than its diminutive stature suggests. It provides the only meaningful competition to not one but two Goliaths in two important parts of the semiconductor industry. Its CPUs—the general-purpose chips at the heart of modern laptops, desktops and data centres—compete with those from Intel, whose $71bn of revenue in 2018 made it the world’s second-biggest chipmaker. Its GPUs—which provide 3D graphics for video games and, increasingly, the computational grunt for trendy machine-learning algorithms—go up against those from Nvidia, whose revenues last year of $11.7bn were nearly twice those of AMD.

...


via Business Feeds

Peugeot’s boss, Carlos Tavares, plans a merger with Fiat Chrysler

IN 2013 TWO Carloses sat atop the Renault-Nissan alliance. One was Carlos Ghosn, the Brazilian-born architect of the Franco-Japanese carmaking colossus. His protégé was Carlos Tavares, the Portuguese chief operating officer of Renault, who made sure that good cars rolled off the production line. But Mr Tavares, an engineer and racing driver, was not content trailing the fast-living Mr Ghosn. As he revealed in an interview that year, his ambition was to lead a big car company, such as General Motors. Mr Ghosn was horrified. Shortly afterwards, Mr Tavares quit Renault. A few months later he was boss of PSA Group, maker of Peugeot and Citroën, Renault’s domestic rival. It was the start of a series of manoeuvres that have now made him the talk of the car industry, much like Mr Ghosn before and after his arrest in Japan last year on charges of financial misconduct (which Mr Ghosn denies).

On October 30th the boards of PSA and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), an Italian-American company, said the two firms planned to merge. Mr Tavares would become chief executive of the combined group and John Elkann, FCA’s chairman (who sits on the board of The Economist’s parent company), would chair its board. It would create the world’s fourth-biggest carmaker by vehicle sales, with a market...



via Business Feeds

Research suggests happy employees are good for firms and investors

THERE IS AN old joke about a new arrival in Hell, who is given the choice by Satan of two different working environments. In the first, frazzled workers shovel huge piles of coal into a fiery furnace. In the second, a group of workers stand, waist-deep in sewage, sipping cups of tea. The condemned man opts, on balance, for the second room. As soon as the door closes, the foreman shouts “Right lads, tea break over. Time to stand on your heads again.”

Terrible working conditions have a long tradition. Early industry was marked by its dirty, dangerous factories (dark, satanic mills). In the early 20th century workers were forced into dull, repetitive tasks by the needs of the production line. However, in a service-based economy, it makes sense that focusing on worker morale might be a much more fruitful approach.

Proving the thesis is more difficult. But that is the aim of a new study* which examines the relationship between happiness and productivity of workers at British Telecom. Three academics—Clement Bellet of Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Jan-Emmanuel de Neve of the Saïd Business School, Oxford, and George Ward of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology—surveyed 1,800 sales workers at 11 British call centres. All each employee had to do was click on a simple emoji each week to indicate their level of...



via Business Feeds

Google Makes Major Commitment to Small Businesses in Underserved Communities

Google Makes Major Commitment to Small Businesses in Underserved Communities

Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) is pledging $10 million to help small businesses in underserved communities. The first part of the initiative involves $2 million to the American Library Association (ALA) to bolster entrepreneur centers in 10 states.

Small Business Trends spoke with Kim Spalding, Global Product Director of Small Business Ads at Google to find out more.

Google Is Helping Small Businesses

“When I talk to small business owners about what they need from Google and digital marketing, I hear the same thing,” she said. “They never have enough time for everything they need to do.”

Part of what sparked this new SMB push was Google releasing new search trends. Numbers from the data showed a three-year high in “mom and pop” ( small business) searches. As well searches using terms like “local and near me” were up 350 times over a decade ago.

Record High

The data even showed a record high last year for terms like “local shops.”

The ongoing rise in mobile shopping is another factor as more and more consumers use these devices to shop. Still Spalding points to a break in what could otherwise be a successful digital chain for SMB’s.

“Only 51% of small businesses in the US have a website. This is really a missed opportunity for them to establish a digital presence.”

Web Presence

She went on to say that even the entrepreneurs that know they need a web presence don’t always know how to get started. Google has several tools to help like Search, Google Ads and Grow with Google.

The new initiative is another arrow in that quiver. It will focus on low income and underrepresented entrepreneurs. Libraries will reach out to community organizations, test new tools to support local entrepreneurs and track how they work.

Spalding explained the link between libraries and this kind of help.

“Ninety six percent of the US population is served by libraries,” she says. “That means we get a really broad reach. What’s more, a large percentage of those libraries already have a small business center.”

Job Seekers

Here’s some information on the resources they provide for job seekers.

“ All of this makes libraries an excellent way to reach small businesses across the US and to specifically focus on low income and minority groups.”

The idea is to provide support to these small business centers with resources, information and coaching. For example, getting access to capital can be very challenging for low income entrepreneurs. The new initiative will help with that and also be helpful in sorting through all the current business trends.

Local Target Market

The Google commitment is at least partially designed to allow these entrepreneurs to connect with their local target market by leveraging the digital world. In a real way it’s all about using the Internet to help folks close to home.

Spalding offers up some numbers on how that works.

“What I find really inspiring is for every dollar you and I spend at a local business, 67 cents stays in the community,” she says.

This new push is an innovative way of helping local small businesses and especially those in low income communities. This commitment isn’t the first time Google has put some wind behind small business sales recently.

In June, Google for Small Business  went live. It’s a website that offers help for small businesses getting started.

There’s no word yet on how the rest of the $10 million will be spent.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "Google Makes Major Commitment to Small Businesses in Underserved Communities" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Google Makes Major Commitment to Small Businesses in Underserved Communities

Google Makes Major Commitment to Small Businesses in Underserved Communities

Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) is pledging $10 million to help small businesses in underserved communities. The first part of the initiative involves $2 million to the American Library Association (ALA) to bolster entrepreneur centers in 10 states.

Small Business Trends spoke with Kim Spalding, Global Product Director of Small Business Ads at Google to find out more.

Google Is Helping Small Businesses

“When I talk to small business owners about what they need from Google and digital marketing, I hear the same thing,” she said. “They never have enough time for everything they need to do.”

Part of what sparked this new SMB push was Google releasing new search trends. Numbers from the data showed a three-year high in “mom and pop” ( small business) searches. As well searches using terms like “local and near me” were up 350 times over a decade ago.

Record High

The data even showed a record high last year for terms like “local shops.”

The ongoing rise in mobile shopping is another factor as more and more consumers use these devices to shop. Still Spalding points to a break in what could otherwise be a successful digital chain for SMB’s.

“Only 51% of small businesses in the US have a website. This is really a missed opportunity for them to establish a digital presence.”

Web Presence

She went on to say that even the entrepreneurs that know they need a web presence don’t always know how to get started. Google has several tools to help like Search, Google Ads and Grow with Google.

The new initiative is another arrow in that quiver. It will focus on low income and underrepresented entrepreneurs. Libraries will reach out to community organizations, test new tools to support local entrepreneurs and track how they work.

Spalding explained the link between libraries and this kind of help.

“Ninety six percent of the US population is served by libraries,” she says. “That means we get a really broad reach. What’s more, a large percentage of those libraries already have a small business center.”

Job Seekers

Here’s some information on the resources they provide for job seekers.

“ All of this makes libraries an excellent way to reach small businesses across the US and to specifically focus on low income and minority groups.”

The idea is to provide support to these small business centers with resources, information and coaching. For example, getting access to capital can be very challenging for low income entrepreneurs. The new initiative will help with that and also be helpful in sorting through all the current business trends.

Local Target Market

The Google commitment is at least partially designed to allow these entrepreneurs to connect with their local target market by leveraging the digital world. In a real way it’s all about using the Internet to help folks close to home.

Spalding offers up some numbers on how that works.

“What I find really inspiring is for every dollar you and I spend at a local business, 67 cents stays in the community,” she says.

This new push is an innovative way of helping local small businesses and especially those in low income communities. This commitment isn’t the first time Google has put some wind behind small business sales recently.

In June, Google for Small Business  went live. It’s a website that offers help for small businesses getting started.

There’s no word yet on how the rest of the $10 million will be spent.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "Google Makes Major Commitment to Small Businesses in Underserved Communities" was first published on Small Business Trends



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How to Start and Grow a Daycare Business

Starting a Daycare Business You Can Grow

Daycare businesses brought in more than $57 million in revenue last year. Though many of these providers are small businesses, it’s still possible to start a daycare business that is able to grow and scale through the years.

Daycare businesses are always in demand. Here are some steps and tips to follow while starting a daycare business of your own.

Starting a Daycare Business

Obtain the Necessary Licenses

Any business in the child care industry is going to need to meet heavy regulations. These vary by state and local community, so it’s important to familiarize yourself with the necessary permits and requirements before getting started. This site includes a resource that can point you toward the relevant rules for your location, so you can learn how to start a daycare business in your specific area. These might include things like having a building with a specific square footage for every child, employee training and location inspections.

Create a Business Plan

Your daycare business plan should include an overview of the child care industry in your area, your company’s mission statement, financial projections and marketing plans. Find a template online to get started and make adjustments as you determine the details of your new daycare business.

Find a Niche & Selling Point

Some daycare businesses offer general care to a wide array of kids. Others focus on a specific target market, like preschool aged kids or those interested in topics like STEM. Even if you want to work with a variety of families, it’s important to determine some of the aspects that will set your center apart from others.

According to Caroline Jens, a childcare consultant and owner of Child Care Biz Help, your business should have a few key pillars that communicate your brand values. Develop these fully and then communicate them with your team so they can bring those pillars into every interaction they have with the families at your center.

Find a Suitable Location

With a daycare center, finding the right location is less about being in a central hub and more about ensuring the building meets local standards and provides enough space and safety features to accommodate your kids and team members. Of course, it’s still nice to be in a convenient location. But make sure that the space you choose is large enough for your projected enrollment and has the features you need, like a kitchen if you plan on preparing meals or multiple rooms if you want to offer services for multiple age groups.

Invest in the Right Equipment

Daycare centers often need cribs, toys, furniture and play equipment in order to provide a quality experience. Your exact purchases may vary based on your niche and target audience. But it’s always important to take safety into account and make sure items are approved for the exact age group you serve. In addition, make sure you invest in first aid kits, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and safety training gear for your team.

Build a Team

If you want your business to actually grow and become sustainable, you need a team at your side. Come up with a list of qualities that you need for every new hire and stick to them, rather than attempting to save money by hiring inexperienced people. According to Jens, some of the qualities to look for in a team member include flexibility, the ability to influence and impact others and a true love for working in child care.

Focus on Safety Training

All of your employees should be trained in CPR, first aid, and any other certifications that are mandated by your state. You also need to make this training part of your onboarding process so you can ensure that any new employees you hire are also compliant.

Fine Tune Tuition and Enrollment Numbers

Your earnings in a daycare business come from how many kids you have enrolled at a time. It’s important to have a goal, as well as minimum and maximum numbers for each time slot throughout the day. That information, along with your financial projections from your business plan, should help you set specific tuition rates.

Market Locally

Once you have the basics set up, it’s time to bring in actual customers to your daycare center. To do this, you’ll need a marketing plan. You can advertise or put up signs or daycare business cards around town. You can focus on optimizing your small business website and online profiles for SEO. Or you can even partner with other local businesses that offer services to families to generate referrals.

Create a Growth Plan

It may also be beneficial to come up with a plan for scaling your business right from the beginning. Do you want to start a franchise program? Look into licensing? Open multiple locations with new operators? There are plenty of different methods to consider. So consider each one carefully and make adjustments based on what you know the requirements may be. For instance, if you want to simply grow your initial location, it’s important to choose a spot with room for additions. If you want to franchise, it’s important to track all of your processes so you can create guides for franchisees later on.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "How to Start and Grow a Daycare Business" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

How to Start and Grow a Daycare Business

Starting a Daycare Business You Can Grow

Daycare businesses brought in more than $57 million in revenue last year. Though many of these providers are small businesses, it’s still possible to start a daycare business that is able to grow and scale through the years.

Daycare businesses are always in demand. Here are some steps and tips to follow while starting a daycare business of your own.

Starting a Daycare Business

Obtain the Necessary Licenses

Any business in the child care industry is going to need to meet heavy regulations. These vary by state and local community, so it’s important to familiarize yourself with the necessary permits and requirements before getting started. This site includes a resource that can point you toward the relevant rules for your location, so you can learn how to start a daycare business in your specific area. These might include things like having a building with a specific square footage for every child, employee training and location inspections.

Create a Business Plan

Your daycare business plan should include an overview of the child care industry in your area, your company’s mission statement, financial projections and marketing plans. Find a template online to get started and make adjustments as you determine the details of your new daycare business.

Find a Niche & Selling Point

Some daycare businesses offer general care to a wide array of kids. Others focus on a specific target market, like preschool aged kids or those interested in topics like STEM. Even if you want to work with a variety of families, it’s important to determine some of the aspects that will set your center apart from others.

According to Caroline Jens, a childcare consultant and owner of Child Care Biz Help, your business should have a few key pillars that communicate your brand values. Develop these fully and then communicate them with your team so they can bring those pillars into every interaction they have with the families at your center.

Find a Suitable Location

With a daycare center, finding the right location is less about being in a central hub and more about ensuring the building meets local standards and provides enough space and safety features to accommodate your kids and team members. Of course, it’s still nice to be in a convenient location. But make sure that the space you choose is large enough for your projected enrollment and has the features you need, like a kitchen if you plan on preparing meals or multiple rooms if you want to offer services for multiple age groups.

Invest in the Right Equipment

Daycare centers often need cribs, toys, furniture and play equipment in order to provide a quality experience. Your exact purchases may vary based on your niche and target audience. But it’s always important to take safety into account and make sure items are approved for the exact age group you serve. In addition, make sure you invest in first aid kits, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and safety training gear for your team.

Build a Team

If you want your business to actually grow and become sustainable, you need a team at your side. Come up with a list of qualities that you need for every new hire and stick to them, rather than attempting to save money by hiring inexperienced people. According to Jens, some of the qualities to look for in a team member include flexibility, the ability to influence and impact others and a true love for working in child care.

Focus on Safety Training

All of your employees should be trained in CPR, first aid, and any other certifications that are mandated by your state. You also need to make this training part of your onboarding process so you can ensure that any new employees you hire are also compliant.

Fine Tune Tuition and Enrollment Numbers

Your earnings in a daycare business come from how many kids you have enrolled at a time. It’s important to have a goal, as well as minimum and maximum numbers for each time slot throughout the day. That information, along with your financial projections from your business plan, should help you set specific tuition rates.

Market Locally

Once you have the basics set up, it’s time to bring in actual customers to your daycare center. To do this, you’ll need a marketing plan. You can advertise or put up signs or daycare business cards around town. You can focus on optimizing your small business website and online profiles for SEO. Or you can even partner with other local businesses that offer services to families to generate referrals.

Create a Growth Plan

It may also be beneficial to come up with a plan for scaling your business right from the beginning. Do you want to start a franchise program? Look into licensing? Open multiple locations with new operators? There are plenty of different methods to consider. So consider each one carefully and make adjustments based on what you know the requirements may be. For instance, if you want to simply grow your initial location, it’s important to choose a spot with room for additions. If you want to franchise, it’s important to track all of your processes so you can create guides for franchisees later on.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "How to Start and Grow a Daycare Business" was first published on Small Business Trends



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5 Visual Strategies To Boost Your Sales This Season

The quickly changing seasonal landscape between October 31st and January 1st may leave you feeling like you’re on a roller coaster ride. You’ve barely got into Halloween mode before it’s time to switch it out for Thanksgiving, and then there’s Black Friday ads, Cyber Monday marketing ideas, Christmas posters and Boxing Day ads. Can you keep up with the ever changing lineup of celebrations, and does it matter?

Seasonal marketing planning

The easy way out is to give up on seasonal marketing and keep up your plain vanilla marketing. The benefit of that is much less work—you don’t have to revamp your website content and marketing plan every week, and you can continue using the same advertising that worked all summer.…

The post 5 Visual Strategies To Boost Your Sales This Season appeared first on SMALL BUSINESS CEO.



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Writing Advice: Trick or Treat?

Happy Halloween! I have two tricks — or two treats — for you, depending on how you look at it:...

The post Writing Advice: Trick or Treat? appeared first on Copyblogger.



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Lavu Partners with Omnivore to Streamline Small Restaurant Tech

Lavu and Omnivore Partnership to Help Restaurants Streamline Their Tech

Point-of-sale (POS) systems now do more than just take payment. They are part of a completely integrated system that allows businesses to bring the front and back end of their operation together.

The partnership between Lavu and Omnivore is expanding on this integration by giving restaurant operators more tools. With this partnership, operators will be able to bring their Lavu POS system for the frontend. And Omnivore will provide its ecosystem of back of house, front of house and outside of house third-party solutions.

Restaurants and Technology

Technology is playing an important role in the restaurant industry and it is becoming crucial to their success. For small businesses, this technology is allowing them to compete with their much larger national operators.

According to the National Restaurant Association (NRA), technology is responsible for increasing sales for four out of five restaurateurs. However, not all restaurants are optimizing the technology to take advantage of what it can offer. And as the expectation of consumers continues to grow in regards to technology integration, the systems have to be put in place.

The CEO of Lavu, Saleem S. Khatri, addresses this very point in the press release. He goes on to say, “We want to provide restaurant operators access to all the technology they need in one place.”

For his part, the CEO of Omnivore Mike Wior, addresses the consumer side. Adding, “Consumers today are expecting technology to be incorporated into their experience. Our collaboration with Lavu helps their customers easily navigate the rapidly advancing technology landscape needed to meet those expectations.”

The Lavu and Omnivore Partnership

Lavu is a global mobile point-of-sale and payment processing system for restaurants and bars. It is currently used in more than 90 countries. The platform provides a flexible payment-processing solution along with a propriety business management suite.

Omnivore offers an end-to-end solution to empower restaurants with guest and operational experiences. This includes everything from online ordering to pay at table, third-party delivery, kiosk/digital menu, reservations, loyalty, inventory, labor and analytics.

The integration is going to give restaurants better operational efficiency and the ability to leverage their data for future agility.

By connecting to more than 200 applications, Omnivore enables restaurant operators to be part of third-party solutions. This includes delivery, analytics, digital menus, guest engagement, online ordering and more.

The goal of this partnership is to deliver on the expectations of today’s consumers when it comes to dining out. Customers now expect a fully integrated system for orders, payment, delivery, marketing, reviews and more. Without these options in place, restaurateurs can not attract new customers nor keep their existing ones.

The Need for Technology in the Restaurant Industry

According to the same report from the National Restaurant Association, the adoption of technology in the industry is growing. However, it is not yet the norm across the board. Those businesses that have invested in technology are doing much better than their counterparts.

In the report, the NRA reveals 81% of restaurants use a POS or electronic register system. However, only 37% of them offer online ordering and another 32% accept mobile payment.

At the same time, only 12% of operators consider their operations to be leading-edge. And surprisingly 32% admit their operations is lagging when it comes to technology use.

Using Obsolete Technology

Another problem the industry faces is the use of obsolete technology. Many small restaurants are still using cash registers. While this may be quaint, it is greatly limiting the opportunities an integrated POS system offers.

With more people using their smartphones to find a restaurant as well as order and pay for their food, restaurants need to do more in adopting the latest technology.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "Lavu Partners with Omnivore to Streamline Small Restaurant Tech" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Lavu Partners with Omnivore to Streamline Small Restaurant Tech

Lavu and Omnivore Partnership to Help Restaurants Streamline Their Tech

Point-of-sale (POS) systems now do more than just take payment. They are part of a completely integrated system that allows businesses to bring the front and back end of their operation together.

The partnership between Lavu and Omnivore is expanding on this integration by giving restaurant operators more tools. With this partnership, operators will be able to bring their Lavu POS system for the frontend. And Omnivore will provide its ecosystem of back of house, front of house and outside of house third-party solutions.

Restaurants and Technology

Technology is playing an important role in the restaurant industry and it is becoming crucial to their success. For small businesses, this technology is allowing them to compete with their much larger national operators.

According to the National Restaurant Association (NRA), technology is responsible for increasing sales for four out of five restaurateurs. However, not all restaurants are optimizing the technology to take advantage of what it can offer. And as the expectation of consumers continues to grow in regards to technology integration, the systems have to be put in place.

The CEO of Lavu, Saleem S. Khatri, addresses this very point in the press release. He goes on to say, “We want to provide restaurant operators access to all the technology they need in one place.”

For his part, the CEO of Omnivore Mike Wior, addresses the consumer side. Adding, “Consumers today are expecting technology to be incorporated into their experience. Our collaboration with Lavu helps their customers easily navigate the rapidly advancing technology landscape needed to meet those expectations.”

The Lavu and Omnivore Partnership

Lavu is a global mobile point-of-sale and payment processing system for restaurants and bars. It is currently used in more than 90 countries. The platform provides a flexible payment-processing solution along with a propriety business management suite.

Omnivore offers an end-to-end solution to empower restaurants with guest and operational experiences. This includes everything from online ordering to pay at table, third-party delivery, kiosk/digital menu, reservations, loyalty, inventory, labor and analytics.

The integration is going to give restaurants better operational efficiency and the ability to leverage their data for future agility.

By connecting to more than 200 applications, Omnivore enables restaurant operators to be part of third-party solutions. This includes delivery, analytics, digital menus, guest engagement, online ordering and more.

The goal of this partnership is to deliver on the expectations of today’s consumers when it comes to dining out. Customers now expect a fully integrated system for orders, payment, delivery, marketing, reviews and more. Without these options in place, restaurateurs can not attract new customers nor keep their existing ones.

The Need for Technology in the Restaurant Industry

According to the same report from the National Restaurant Association, the adoption of technology in the industry is growing. However, it is not yet the norm across the board. Those businesses that have invested in technology are doing much better than their counterparts.

In the report, the NRA reveals 81% of restaurants use a POS or electronic register system. However, only 37% of them offer online ordering and another 32% accept mobile payment.

At the same time, only 12% of operators consider their operations to be leading-edge. And surprisingly 32% admit their operations is lagging when it comes to technology use.

Using Obsolete Technology

Another problem the industry faces is the use of obsolete technology. Many small restaurants are still using cash registers. While this may be quaint, it is greatly limiting the opportunities an integrated POS system offers.

With more people using their smartphones to find a restaurant as well as order and pay for their food, restaurants need to do more in adopting the latest technology.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "Lavu Partners with Omnivore to Streamline Small Restaurant Tech" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

The 10 Best Reporting and Business Intelligence Tools for Marketers

Whether you're conducting a blog traffic audit or analyzing the success of your most recent social media campaign, it's undeniable that data is an integral part of any marketing role.

Fortunately, there are dozens of analytics tools for marketers with the ability to collect data from different sources, crunch it effectively, and deliver helpful campaign analysis.

Some tools, however, are better at delivering valuable reporting results than others.

Ultimately, reporting tools should do more than just calculate -- they should also make the marketer’s job easier, and more productive. Creating attractive and readable reports is key to ensuring that the results of your work are clear for your entire team.

Here, let's dive into some of the best data reporting tools, as well as some effective business intelligence (BI) platforms, to enable you to properly analyze your work.

Best Data Reporting Tools

Here are some tools with reporting features invaluable to today’s marketers.

1. Calendar

Calendar offers analytics of a slightly different sort -- productivity. Calendar has a number of features designed to analyze how your team’s time is spent. By tracking your moment-to-moment activities on a daily basis, you can identify key areas in which your schedule could be improved.

As important as it is to have your marketing analytics at your fingertips, knowing how you use your time is just as important for maximizing output. Calendar’s clear and simple reporting tools give you helpful reports on what your agenda looks like and what you can do to make it better.

(Disclosure: I’ve invested in Calendar)

2. DashThis

DashThis is an effective tool for keeping up with your marketing analytics at a glance. As its name suggests, DashThis is best used as a dashboard and provides clear and readable data on your marketing performance.

DashThis lets you to select a template and then automatically fills that template with your data, greatly streamlining the reporting process. It also exports data into PDF files, which can be easily shared between team members.

3. HubSpot

HubSpot’s marketing analytics software is useful for keeping all of your needs, including reporting, in one place. HubSpot lets you combine all of your marketing efforts into one report, or mix-and-match your different assets to create different reports for different clients and needs.

HubSpot’s marketing analytics dashboard is just as customizable, allowing you to add and remove different reports with ease. Best of all, you can get both a general overview and specific insights into your work’s performance, since you can easily move between different marketing reports within HubSpot.

4. Raven Tools

Raven Tools offers many of the tools expected from reporting software -- SEO analysis, social media engagement, funnel performance tracking -- as well as competitor comparison.

Whether it’s big-picture analyses like domain authority or small-scale comparisons of site functionality, Raven Tools lets you stay on top of how you’re faring in competitive spaces. Additionally, its drag-and-drop editor and report generator makes creating custom, professional-grade marketing reports easier.

5. Megalytic

Megalytic eases the process of combining marketing data from lots of different sources. Plenty of tools on this list allow for the integration of different types of data, but Megalytic is especially designed to import data from a range of marketing software.

It takes only a couple of moments to access data from Google Analytics, Facebook Ads, Adwords, and more on Megalytic, and it can even process and report data stored in CSV files. If you’re looking to produce a comprehensive report that pulls together loads of disparate data into one place, Megalytic is a smart choice.

6. Kilpfolio

As important as it is for reporting tools to effectively take in and analyze data, they need to be able to produce readable reports, as well. Klipfolio is great for making sure your reports can be read and accessed with ease across technologies.

Additionally, Kilpfolio allows you to share access to your reports through Slack, email, or custom links, and it also enables you to sync your dashboards in real time across multiple devices such as smartphones, web browsers, and even TV screens. Being able to easily pull up your analytics dashboard at any moment on any number of devices is crucial for being able to report on-the-go or from various locations.

7. Mixpanel

Mixpanel is a tracking and reporting software tool that was actually created primarily for product managers, not marketers. As a result, its interface isn’t quite as streamlined or marketing-driven as some of the other entries on this list, but it makes up for this with deep, powerful analytics tools that give you insight into how your work is faring.

Mixpanel is particularly attuned to identifying trends in engagement and count. It tracks how people engage with certain products over time and how different features influence user behavior.

If you’re especially interested in keeping track of how a certain site or product is performing, it can be a valuable tool for reporting on that kind of information. Mixpanel allows you to produce readable reports of uniquely high-level data analysis.

Best Business Intelligence Platforms

Ultimately, reporting is only half the battle. Marketers also need business intelligence tools for a top-down view of their operations.

Although BI is a broad category, these three tools are essential for marketers.

1. Intercom

Although Intercom is a messaging platform first and foremost, it also delivers a deep view of a company’s customer base. Through integrations with over 100 marketing tools, Intercom lets marketers track, segment, and identify similarities between their customers.

One of the best use cases for Intercom’s BI features is account-based marketing. Intercom displays performance figures for each stage of your sales and marketing funnel, helping you see where the best opportunities lie and how to tap into them. You can also break down metrics by individual representatives, teams, timeframes, and more.

2. G2

G2 is the go-to website for stacking up software tools against one another. G2 gives detailed charts for every category of marketing software, explaining the strengths and weaknesses of each available product.

Need an enterprise resource planning tool? G2 covers those. What about an e-commerce platform? G2 can help you pick the best option in that category, too. Certain services, including staffing and translation services, are also reviewed by G2.

3. Databox

Through integrations with HubSpot CRM, Google Analytics, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and more, Databox compiles popular marketing services and social media into one interface. Although Databox comes with pre-configured report templates, users can also design custom reports.Think of Databox like a dashboard for your dashboards.

The reporting tool lets you view campaign KPIs, check progress, calculate investment returns, and receive notifications when metrics fall outside of specified ranges. Databox has a desktop version, of course, but it also displays data on mobile and via applications like Slack.

Statisticians and analysts may be more comfortable with reporting and BI than marketers, but these tools make it easy. Pick the right ones, and get data-driven campaign insights with ease.



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Want Mindfulness Options for your Employees? Try These 10 Tips

10 Mindfulness Tips You Can Start Practicing at Work

 

In the past, going to work meant slaving away for hours at a time without taking a moment for yourself.

And, more often than not, it felt like you were trading meaningful life moments for tedious work tasks.

Today, however, employees and companies are improving working conditions through one health trend: mindfulness.

The word “mindfulness” has been thrown around a lot recently by fitness gurus and celebrities, but many are still confused as to what it really is.

So what is mindfulness, anyway?

Looking at a definition by the University of California, Berkeley, mindfulness is the ability to maintain a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.

By using techniques to practice mindfulness, especially at work, you can reduce stress, boost your immune system, and improve your productivity.

10 Mindfulness techniques

So, in order to help you reach your full unicorn potential, here are 10 mindfulness techniques to practice at work!

1. Set an intention at the beginning of every day.

In order to set yourself up to have a successful day, you should write down an intention to keep you focused.

Your intention could be a work goal or something more personal, such as “I will look at every obstacle today as a positive learning experience.”

You can either write the intention down on a Post-It note and stick it on your computer, or you can repeat it to yourself while at work.

By doing this, you get to keep a mental mantra to help you get through the day. This mindfulness technique also prompts you to check in with yourself and consider behaviors that you can change to become more in-tune with yourself.

2. Make your work meaningful.

It can be hard to be mindful during work if you don’t enjoy your job.

That’s why you need to find purpose in what you do.

Take a moment to reflect: why did you decide to apply for the job?

What moments during the day bring you joy?

Grab a piece of paper and write a list of things that make your work meaningful.

This way, when you’re having a hard day, you can look back at the list and remind yourself what you get up for every day.

3. Learn how to be present.

No matter what type of environment you work in, it’s easy to simply go through the motions of a job without thinking.

When you find yourself daydreaming or drifting away from your work, take a break to check in with your surroundings.

There are a few questions that you can use to ground yourself and become present in the moment. What is one task that you can work on? What’s going on around you; who’s there, what are they up to, what noises do you hear? What have you accomplished so far today?

Taking the time to observe yourself and your work will recenter you, boosting concentration and giving you a second wind to finish the day strong.

4. Take a meditation break.

Stressed out? Meditate it out.

Although mindfulness is typically about being attuned to your thoughts, sometimes you need to clear your mind to focus on what’s important.

Take a ten-minute break during the day to go sit outside and listen to a quick podcast or meditation app to reset your mind.

Once you return to work, you will feel refreshed and ready to get back on task.

5. Focus on one task at a time.

Have you ever tried to do three things at once? When you do, are any of the tasks done well?

Probably not.

It’s important to focus on one thing at a time when practicing mindfulness.

When you try to do too much work at once, you become overwhelmed and arent able to complete any of the assignments to the best of your ability.

Start by making a list of tasks to complete, ordering them by importance.

Then, once you’re leaving work to head home, you will be able to look back at the day feeling fulfilled.

6. Practice having a growth mindset.

Every successful unicorn has one thing in common: they all have a growth mindset.

Instead of saying that you cannot change, work to improve your skills and life.

Of course, this is easier said than done.

In order to practice a growth mindset, try setting small goals for yourself.

It’s also important, though challenging, to find and acknowledge your weaknesses; this gives you the vantage point to shut down that self-critical voice that can sometimes hold you back.

Enforcing a growth mindset will help you be more mindful of your everyday behavior while improving your self-esteem both in and outside of work.

7. Embrace your feelings.

Sometimes people mistake mindfulness with a constant feeling and expression of peace and happiness.

But let’s be real: can anyone be happy all the time?

Having emotions, even negative emotions, is a normal and common part of life. Most days, people go through multiple different emotions. That’s why, when you’re practicing mindfulness, it is important to learn how to embrace your feelings

It’s difficult, but acknowledging your emotions – simply sitting with them and telling yourself “I am feeling angry right now” – is the first step to letting the feeling pass.

If you try to ignore your emotions or push them away, they will continue to bother you, affecting your productivity and, more importantly, hurting your well being.

This mindfulness technique is useful for stressful days at work. Embrace your stress and then continue practicing other mindfulness techniques, like meditation, to release the emotion and get back on track.

8. Take lunch to eat lunch.

Many people will take a break to grab a quick bite — but then sit down to eat it while they continue working.

Before they know it, that 30-minute break is over and they haven’t finished their meal or work.

Just take your lunch break to eat lunch.

Don’t look at your phone, don’t think about work, and don’t read any emails!

Using your lunch break to relax and eat lunch helps recharge you and gives you an energy boost. Checking out for a moment will only help improve your focus once you’re back at work.

9. Stretch.

Mindfulness isn’t just about being in tune with your thoughts — it’s about being aware of your physical body too!

Whether you work on a computer or are on your feet all day, take a break and stretch.

Pay special attention to the parts of your body that ache or feel tight, so that way you can continue to care for yourself after returning to your desk.

10. Write down your accomplishments.

Sometimes you don’t realize how much you accomplished at work until you actually write down all of the positive things that happened.

Take a moment before heading home to run through your day and jot down any successes you had. This will make you feel better about your day, your productivity, and your purpose. It allows you to breathe and release the day so you don’t spend your evening worrying about it.

Don’t forget to leave your list of accomplishments on your desk to read the next morning, immediately setting yourself up for another successful day!

Practicing Mindfulness at Work is Easy

Sometimes, work is stressful. We’ve all been there; the days are long, work piles up, and it can feel like it’s never going to get done!

But with these 10 easy mindfulness techniques, you’re well set up to have a productive day at work that’s also productive for your mental health.

Taking into account your own health and well being is the first step to producing good work, and mindfulness is a great first step to get there!

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "Want Mindfulness Options for your Employees? Try These 10 Tips" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Want Mindfulness Options for your Employees? Try These 10 Tips

10 Mindfulness Tips You Can Start Practicing at Work

 

In the past, going to work meant slaving away for hours at a time without taking a moment for yourself.

And, more often than not, it felt like you were trading meaningful life moments for tedious work tasks.

Today, however, employees and companies are improving working conditions through one health trend: mindfulness.

The word “mindfulness” has been thrown around a lot recently by fitness gurus and celebrities, but many are still confused as to what it really is.

So what is mindfulness, anyway?

Looking at a definition by the University of California, Berkeley, mindfulness is the ability to maintain a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.

By using techniques to practice mindfulness, especially at work, you can reduce stress, boost your immune system, and improve your productivity.

10 Mindfulness techniques

So, in order to help you reach your full unicorn potential, here are 10 mindfulness techniques to practice at work!

1. Set an intention at the beginning of every day.

In order to set yourself up to have a successful day, you should write down an intention to keep you focused.

Your intention could be a work goal or something more personal, such as “I will look at every obstacle today as a positive learning experience.”

You can either write the intention down on a Post-It note and stick it on your computer, or you can repeat it to yourself while at work.

By doing this, you get to keep a mental mantra to help you get through the day. This mindfulness technique also prompts you to check in with yourself and consider behaviors that you can change to become more in-tune with yourself.

2. Make your work meaningful.

It can be hard to be mindful during work if you don’t enjoy your job.

That’s why you need to find purpose in what you do.

Take a moment to reflect: why did you decide to apply for the job?

What moments during the day bring you joy?

Grab a piece of paper and write a list of things that make your work meaningful.

This way, when you’re having a hard day, you can look back at the list and remind yourself what you get up for every day.

3. Learn how to be present.

No matter what type of environment you work in, it’s easy to simply go through the motions of a job without thinking.

When you find yourself daydreaming or drifting away from your work, take a break to check in with your surroundings.

There are a few questions that you can use to ground yourself and become present in the moment. What is one task that you can work on? What’s going on around you; who’s there, what are they up to, what noises do you hear? What have you accomplished so far today?

Taking the time to observe yourself and your work will recenter you, boosting concentration and giving you a second wind to finish the day strong.

4. Take a meditation break.

Stressed out? Meditate it out.

Although mindfulness is typically about being attuned to your thoughts, sometimes you need to clear your mind to focus on what’s important.

Take a ten-minute break during the day to go sit outside and listen to a quick podcast or meditation app to reset your mind.

Once you return to work, you will feel refreshed and ready to get back on task.

5. Focus on one task at a time.

Have you ever tried to do three things at once? When you do, are any of the tasks done well?

Probably not.

It’s important to focus on one thing at a time when practicing mindfulness.

When you try to do too much work at once, you become overwhelmed and arent able to complete any of the assignments to the best of your ability.

Start by making a list of tasks to complete, ordering them by importance.

Then, once you’re leaving work to head home, you will be able to look back at the day feeling fulfilled.

6. Practice having a growth mindset.

Every successful unicorn has one thing in common: they all have a growth mindset.

Instead of saying that you cannot change, work to improve your skills and life.

Of course, this is easier said than done.

In order to practice a growth mindset, try setting small goals for yourself.

It’s also important, though challenging, to find and acknowledge your weaknesses; this gives you the vantage point to shut down that self-critical voice that can sometimes hold you back.

Enforcing a growth mindset will help you be more mindful of your everyday behavior while improving your self-esteem both in and outside of work.

7. Embrace your feelings.

Sometimes people mistake mindfulness with a constant feeling and expression of peace and happiness.

But let’s be real: can anyone be happy all the time?

Having emotions, even negative emotions, is a normal and common part of life. Most days, people go through multiple different emotions. That’s why, when you’re practicing mindfulness, it is important to learn how to embrace your feelings

It’s difficult, but acknowledging your emotions – simply sitting with them and telling yourself “I am feeling angry right now” – is the first step to letting the feeling pass.

If you try to ignore your emotions or push them away, they will continue to bother you, affecting your productivity and, more importantly, hurting your well being.

This mindfulness technique is useful for stressful days at work. Embrace your stress and then continue practicing other mindfulness techniques, like meditation, to release the emotion and get back on track.

8. Take lunch to eat lunch.

Many people will take a break to grab a quick bite — but then sit down to eat it while they continue working.

Before they know it, that 30-minute break is over and they haven’t finished their meal or work.

Just take your lunch break to eat lunch.

Don’t look at your phone, don’t think about work, and don’t read any emails!

Using your lunch break to relax and eat lunch helps recharge you and gives you an energy boost. Checking out for a moment will only help improve your focus once you’re back at work.

9. Stretch.

Mindfulness isn’t just about being in tune with your thoughts — it’s about being aware of your physical body too!

Whether you work on a computer or are on your feet all day, take a break and stretch.

Pay special attention to the parts of your body that ache or feel tight, so that way you can continue to care for yourself after returning to your desk.

10. Write down your accomplishments.

Sometimes you don’t realize how much you accomplished at work until you actually write down all of the positive things that happened.

Take a moment before heading home to run through your day and jot down any successes you had. This will make you feel better about your day, your productivity, and your purpose. It allows you to breathe and release the day so you don’t spend your evening worrying about it.

Don’t forget to leave your list of accomplishments on your desk to read the next morning, immediately setting yourself up for another successful day!

Practicing Mindfulness at Work is Easy

Sometimes, work is stressful. We’ve all been there; the days are long, work piles up, and it can feel like it’s never going to get done!

But with these 10 easy mindfulness techniques, you’re well set up to have a productive day at work that’s also productive for your mental health.

Taking into account your own health and well being is the first step to producing good work, and mindfulness is a great first step to get there!

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "Want Mindfulness Options for your Employees? Try These 10 Tips" was first published on Small Business Trends



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