The States with the Highest and Lowest Small Business Job Growth Since 2016

Small Business Job Growth

The pandemic has had a huge impact on small businesses. Job growth is one area that has been heavily affected by the ongoing upheaval. As some small businesses have been forced to lay off workers, others have been taking more staff on.

In its “United States of Small Business” report, Next Insurance sheds light on job growth patterns within different states.

The statistics are important for small business owners as they reveal which locations are less ‘bruised’ by the pandemic. With job creation higher in certain states, small businesses may be wise to relocate or startup in more dynamic locations.

Check out the states with the highest and lowest small business job growth from 2016 – 2020.

States with the Highest Small Business Jobs Increase

1. Utah

Utah witnessed the largest increase in jobs within the US, with a 23.52% rise.

2. Nevada

In second place is Nevada, which has experienced a 23.11% increase since 2016.

3. Idaho

Idaho is the third best state in terms of job growth with a 20.73% increase.

4. Colorado

Colorado is fourth in line, witnessing a 19.58% rise since 2016.

5. Florida

Just behind Colorado is Florida with a 18.35% surge in jobs.

6. Washington

Washington has seen a 17.72% increase in job growth.

7. Texas

Texas is just behind with a 17.58% rise.

8. Arizona

Arizona has witnessed a 17.5% increase since 2016.

9. Delaware

Delaware’s job growth is 17.28% for the same period.

10. South Carolina

South Carolina is the tenth highest state in terms of jobs creation with a 17.11% rise.

States with the Lowest Small Business Jobs Increase

1. West Virginia

At the other end of the spectrum is West Virginia with a -4.06% jobs growth figure.

2. Louisiana

Louisiana has witnessed a 5.41% rise.

3. New Mexico

New Mexico’s increase has been limited to 5.47%.

4. Alaska

Alaska has had a 6.36% rise.

5. Wyoming

Wyoming’s job creation figure is at 6.36%.

6. Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s growth has been limited to 6.54%.

7. Iowa

Iowa is at the same number.

8. Connecticut

Connecticut has experienced a rise of 6.81%.

9. Mississippi

The state of Mississippi has seen a 7.17% rise in jobs since 2016.

10. Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania’s job creation market has witnessed a 7.21% increase.

Small business growth and employment by state

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "The States with the Highest and Lowest Small Business Job Growth Since 2016" was first published on Small Business Trends



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The States with the Highest and Lowest Small Business Job Growth Since 2016

Small Business Job Growth

The pandemic has had a huge impact on small businesses. Job growth is one area that has been heavily affected by the ongoing upheaval. As some small businesses have been forced to lay off workers, others have been taking more staff on.

In its “United States of Small Business” report, Next Insurance sheds light on job growth patterns within different states.

The statistics are important for small business owners as they reveal which locations are less ‘bruised’ by the pandemic. With job creation higher in certain states, small businesses may be wise to relocate or startup in more dynamic locations.

Check out the states with the highest and lowest small business job growth from 2016 – 2020.

States with the Highest Small Business Jobs Increase

1. Utah

Utah witnessed the largest increase in jobs within the US, with a 23.52% rise.

2. Nevada

In second place is Nevada, which has experienced a 23.11% increase since 2016.

3. Idaho

Idaho is the third best state in terms of job growth with a 20.73% increase.

4. Colorado

Colorado is fourth in line, witnessing a 19.58% rise since 2016.

5. Florida

Just behind Colorado is Florida with a 18.35% surge in jobs.

6. Washington

Washington has seen a 17.72% increase in job growth.

7. Texas

Texas is just behind with a 17.58% rise.

8. Arizona

Arizona has witnessed a 17.5% increase since 2016.

9. Delaware

Delaware’s job growth is 17.28% for the same period.

10. South Carolina

South Carolina is the tenth highest state in terms of jobs creation with a 17.11% rise.

States with the Lowest Small Business Jobs Increase

1. West Virginia

At the other end of the spectrum is West Virginia with a -4.06% jobs growth figure.

2. Louisiana

Louisiana has witnessed a 5.41% rise.

3. New Mexico

New Mexico’s increase has been limited to 5.47%.

4. Alaska

Alaska has had a 6.36% rise.

5. Wyoming

Wyoming’s job creation figure is at 6.36%.

6. Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s growth has been limited to 6.54%.

7. Iowa

Iowa is at the same number.

8. Connecticut

Connecticut has experienced a rise of 6.81%.

9. Mississippi

The state of Mississippi has seen a 7.17% rise in jobs since 2016.

10. Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania’s job creation market has witnessed a 7.21% increase.

Small business growth and employment by state

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "The States with the Highest and Lowest Small Business Job Growth Since 2016" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Read Upstream and Never Solve Problems Again

Upstream

Are you sick and tired of reacting to problems?  You start each day with lofty goals only to be sidetracked by one fire after another.  If you’re ready to stop the madness and prevent those problems from robbing you of your time and sanity, grab yourself a copy of  Upstream: The Quest to Solve Problems Before They Happen by Dan Heath.

A few days ago, I received a promotional email from Dan Heath promoting this new book and I immediately requested a review copy.  It showed up two days later, and I read it over the weekend.  Yeah.  It’s that good.

Like preceding books written by the Heath brothers, Upstream takes on a common principle or topic and shines a light on it in such a way that makes you see it in a whole new light. 

Dan Heath Goes Solo

Along with his brother Chip, Dan Heath has written four New York Times Bestselling Books; Made to StickSwitchDecisive, and The Power of Moments.  Heath is a senior fellow at Duke University’s CASE Center, which supports entrepreneurs fighting for social good. 

While he’s listed as the sole author of Upstream, he credits his brother, Chip, for his significant contributions. 

In his latest work, Upstream, he explores “problems” and our default behaviors of solving problems or preventing problems.  “When you spend years solving problems you sometimes overlook the fact that you could be preventing them.”

And this is where it gets interesting.

Upstream Is a Delightful Roller-Coaster Ride

Heath starts the book with a parable that perfectly illustrates the premise of Upstream.  

You and a friend are picnicking at the side of a river when you see a child drowning.  Without thinking you run in and rescue the drowning child.  But soon another child is drowning and your friend jumps in to save them. This process repeats itself several times when you notice your friend comes out of the water. “Where are you going?” you ask. Your friend answers “I’m going upstream to tackle the guy who’s drowning all these kids!” (A public health parable attributed to Irving Zola)

Without skipping a beat, Heath introduces the first of many real-life examples of people at all levels of organizations who recognize a problem and more importantly, decide that this problem is entirely avoidable.

In fact, the entire book flows from one story to another. Some examples are simple, personal upstream problem-solving examples like installing a timer on a light to make sure that it shuts off. Followed by insanely frustrating stories of nurses in hospitals who are so busy coming up with creative problem work-a-rounds that they don’t have the time to think about “Upstream” prevention strategies.

As a reader, I went from hopeful to hopeless and back to hopeful again about every three pages. Granted, reading Upstream isn’t quite like watching sports or the news, but I found myself doing everything from giggling to rolling my eyes and sometimes even shouting at the book.

This isn’t often said about business books, but I’d love to see Upstream turned into a documentary.  It’s just that riveting and entertaining.

Thinking Upstream Feels Strange and Hard

So, let’s take a look at how Heath was able to generate this kind of reader engagement.

Because neither problem-solving nor problem-prevention are anything new, Heath had to find a way to make these broad topics intriguing enough and relevant enough for us to stop and take notice.

He does this by using the stories he’s collected from 300 interviews that clearly illustrate real problems, the obstacles and challenges people faced in trying to understand the problem and the brave choices they made to shift their thinking “upstream” toward improving or eliminating the issue completely.

The book is divided into three main sections. The first section covers the three barriers to upstream thinking; the inability to recognize the problem, a lack of problem ownership, and finally the tendency for scarcity to drive short term problem-solving instead of problem prevention.

The second section is the meat of the book and addresses the key questions you have to address in order to recognize the problem, change the system, and ultimately reap the benefits.

  • How to unite the right people? If a problem is invisible, it’s no one’s job to fix them. Surround the problem and recruit the best people who are united in a common vision for the future. 

  • How to change the system? A well-designed system is the best upstream intervention. To change the system is to change the rules that create the problem.

  • Where can you find a point of leverage? Understanding the problem and looking for what works and what doesn’t. 

  • How will you get an early warning of the problem? Use data to look for patterns that will help you predict the problem. 

  • How will you know you’re succeeding?  With upstream efforts, success is difficult to quantify. Watch out of “ghost victories” and check your short-term results to make sure they are meeting your long-term goals.

  • How will you avoid doing harm? Look beyond the immediate win. Create a feedback loop to make sure you’re not creating unintended consequences.

  • Who will pay for what doesn’t happen? We reward people for solving problems – not avoiding them. Upstream efforts are often invisible. We tend to underinvest in keeping people healthy, for example. 

Each of Heath’s questions assumes that you understand and have overcome the three barriers to upstream thinking.

Finally, the third section shifts the conversation from what others have done to what you could possibly do. 

Why Read Upstream Today?

As entrepreneurs, we believe in controlling our lives, our time, and our success. Upstream thinking is all about control.  As you go through the book, you’ll find many examples of simple upstream thinking that you’ll be able to implement at that very moment. This will motivate and inspire you to think about the next level of upstream projects that you can tackle.

This year has laid bare so many “problems” that have touched each of us in a personal way.  The daily challenges of life may feel insurmountable to you.  And, if that describes how you’ve been feeling, reading Upstream will give you solace and hope.

Image: amazon.com

This article, "Read Upstream and Never Solve Problems Again" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Read Upstream and Never Solve Problems Again

Upstream

Are you sick and tired of reacting to problems?  You start each day with lofty goals only to be sidetracked by one fire after another.  If you’re ready to stop the madness and prevent those problems from robbing you of your time and sanity, grab yourself a copy of  Upstream: The Quest to Solve Problems Before They Happen by Dan Heath.

A few days ago, I received a promotional email from Dan Heath promoting this new book and I immediately requested a review copy.  It showed up two days later, and I read it over the weekend.  Yeah.  It’s that good.

Like preceding books written by the Heath brothers, Upstream takes on a common principle or topic and shines a light on it in such a way that makes you see it in a whole new light. 

Dan Heath Goes Solo

Along with his brother Chip, Dan Heath has written four New York Times Bestselling Books; Made to StickSwitchDecisive, and The Power of Moments.  Heath is a senior fellow at Duke University’s CASE Center, which supports entrepreneurs fighting for social good. 

While he’s listed as the sole author of Upstream, he credits his brother, Chip, for his significant contributions. 

In his latest work, Upstream, he explores “problems” and our default behaviors of solving problems or preventing problems.  “When you spend years solving problems you sometimes overlook the fact that you could be preventing them.”

And this is where it gets interesting.

Upstream Is a Delightful Roller-Coaster Ride

Heath starts the book with a parable that perfectly illustrates the premise of Upstream.  

You and a friend are picnicking at the side of a river when you see a child drowning.  Without thinking you run in and rescue the drowning child.  But soon another child is drowning and your friend jumps in to save them. This process repeats itself several times when you notice your friend comes out of the water. “Where are you going?” you ask. Your friend answers “I’m going upstream to tackle the guy who’s drowning all these kids!” (A public health parable attributed to Irving Zola)

Without skipping a beat, Heath introduces the first of many real-life examples of people at all levels of organizations who recognize a problem and more importantly, decide that this problem is entirely avoidable.

In fact, the entire book flows from one story to another. Some examples are simple, personal upstream problem-solving examples like installing a timer on a light to make sure that it shuts off. Followed by insanely frustrating stories of nurses in hospitals who are so busy coming up with creative problem work-a-rounds that they don’t have the time to think about “Upstream” prevention strategies.

As a reader, I went from hopeful to hopeless and back to hopeful again about every three pages. Granted, reading Upstream isn’t quite like watching sports or the news, but I found myself doing everything from giggling to rolling my eyes and sometimes even shouting at the book.

This isn’t often said about business books, but I’d love to see Upstream turned into a documentary.  It’s just that riveting and entertaining.

Thinking Upstream Feels Strange and Hard

So, let’s take a look at how Heath was able to generate this kind of reader engagement.

Because neither problem-solving nor problem-prevention are anything new, Heath had to find a way to make these broad topics intriguing enough and relevant enough for us to stop and take notice.

He does this by using the stories he’s collected from 300 interviews that clearly illustrate real problems, the obstacles and challenges people faced in trying to understand the problem and the brave choices they made to shift their thinking “upstream” toward improving or eliminating the issue completely.

The book is divided into three main sections. The first section covers the three barriers to upstream thinking; the inability to recognize the problem, a lack of problem ownership, and finally the tendency for scarcity to drive short term problem-solving instead of problem prevention.

The second section is the meat of the book and addresses the key questions you have to address in order to recognize the problem, change the system, and ultimately reap the benefits.

  • How to unite the right people? If a problem is invisible, it’s no one’s job to fix them. Surround the problem and recruit the best people who are united in a common vision for the future. 

  • How to change the system? A well-designed system is the best upstream intervention. To change the system is to change the rules that create the problem.

  • Where can you find a point of leverage? Understanding the problem and looking for what works and what doesn’t. 

  • How will you get an early warning of the problem? Use data to look for patterns that will help you predict the problem. 

  • How will you know you’re succeeding?  With upstream efforts, success is difficult to quantify. Watch out of “ghost victories” and check your short-term results to make sure they are meeting your long-term goals.

  • How will you avoid doing harm? Look beyond the immediate win. Create a feedback loop to make sure you’re not creating unintended consequences.

  • Who will pay for what doesn’t happen? We reward people for solving problems – not avoiding them. Upstream efforts are often invisible. We tend to underinvest in keeping people healthy, for example. 

Each of Heath’s questions assumes that you understand and have overcome the three barriers to upstream thinking.

Finally, the third section shifts the conversation from what others have done to what you could possibly do. 

Why Read Upstream Today?

As entrepreneurs, we believe in controlling our lives, our time, and our success. Upstream thinking is all about control.  As you go through the book, you’ll find many examples of simple upstream thinking that you’ll be able to implement at that very moment. This will motivate and inspire you to think about the next level of upstream projects that you can tackle.

This year has laid bare so many “problems” that have touched each of us in a personal way.  The daily challenges of life may feel insurmountable to you.  And, if that describes how you’ve been feeling, reading Upstream will give you solace and hope.

Image: amazon.com

This article, "Read Upstream and Never Solve Problems Again" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

10 Ways to Rethink Your Business Tools to Optimize Their Value

Business Tools

To make the most of the tools and platforms your business uses, you may need to change your thinking. You can look at things in new ways or find new uses for tools you already use. Here are tips from the online small business community to help you get more value out of everything.

Drive Local Foot Traffic With Twitter Ads

Twitter isn’t just for promoting online offerings. Local businesses can use the tool to drive foot traffic. Small Business Trends is pleased to share this Social Media Examiner post by our Executive Editor Shawn Hessinger. Check it out for tips on using Twitter to drive local foot traffic.

Learn How the Twitter Algorithm Changes

Twitter and other social sites are constantly updating their algorithms. And this can change the way you use those platforms. In this Inspire to Thrive post, Lisa Sicard goes over changes to the Algorithm. And BizSugar members offered thoughts on the post here.

Create Content Marketing Beyond White Papers

White papers are a common form of long form content. They can be effective for businesses that want to show off industry expertise. However, they’re not the only option. In this UpCity post, Dayna Boyer details some other options.

Generate Leads Using Video

Lots of businesses use video to promote products or create useful content. But it can also be used as a lead generation strategy. Amir Shahzeidi offers tips for video sales funnels in this GetResponse post.

Find Super Focused Long Tail Keywords

Keywords aren’t just basic terms that describe your products or industry. Long tail keywords give you a way to get even more specific about your search terms. In this Bright Local post, Emil Kristensen goes over tips for finding super relevant long tail keywords.

Highlight Health and Safety Measures with Google My Business

Google My Business isn’t just for sharing your products, hours, and location. As more local shops and restaurants reopen, it’s important to highlight health and safety measures. Greg Sterling goes over how to do this in this Search Engine Land post.

Learn from Experienced Bloggers

You don’t need a ton of experience to blog successfully. However, you can learn some valuable lessons from those who have blogged for years. In this Mixergy interview, Small Business Trends’ publisher Anita Campbell shares insights from her 17 years of blogging.

Adjust Your Facebook Strategy Based on Current Trends and Statistics

As social platforms change, it’s important to always keep up with trends and adjust your strategy accordingly. This Startup Bonsai post by Lindsay Liedke includes statistics and facts to help businesses learn more about Facebook. You can also see reaction to the post over on BizSugar.

Force a Midlife Crisis on Your Brand

Most people think of midlife crises as something that individuals go through. But brands can experience similar transitions. And it may even be beneficial to put your company through one. Daniel Burstein elaborates in this Target Marketing post.

Benefit from E-Learning

E-learning is especially common for kids in school right now. But small businesses can also take advantage of this concept. In this post on the Small Biz Daily blog, Nikola Djordjevic discusses how businesses can utilize e-learning.

If you’d like to suggest your favorite small business content to be considered for an upcoming community roundup, please send your news tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "10 Ways to Rethink Your Business Tools to Optimize Their Value" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

10 Ways to Rethink Your Business Tools to Optimize Their Value

Business Tools

To make the most of the tools and platforms your business uses, you may need to change your thinking. You can look at things in new ways or find new uses for tools you already use. Here are tips from the online small business community to help you get more value out of everything.

Drive Local Foot Traffic With Twitter Ads

Twitter isn’t just for promoting online offerings. Local businesses can use the tool to drive foot traffic. Small Business Trends is pleased to share this Social Media Examiner post by our Executive Editor Shawn Hessinger. Check it out for tips on using Twitter to drive local foot traffic.

Learn How the Twitter Algorithm Changes

Twitter and other social sites are constantly updating their algorithms. And this can change the way you use those platforms. In this Inspire to Thrive post, Lisa Sicard goes over changes to the Algorithm. And BizSugar members offered thoughts on the post here.

Create Content Marketing Beyond White Papers

White papers are a common form of long form content. They can be effective for businesses that want to show off industry expertise. However, they’re not the only option. In this UpCity post, Dayna Boyer details some other options.

Generate Leads Using Video

Lots of businesses use video to promote products or create useful content. But it can also be used as a lead generation strategy. Amir Shahzeidi offers tips for video sales funnels in this GetResponse post.

Find Super Focused Long Tail Keywords

Keywords aren’t just basic terms that describe your products or industry. Long tail keywords give you a way to get even more specific about your search terms. In this Bright Local post, Emil Kristensen goes over tips for finding super relevant long tail keywords.

Highlight Health and Safety Measures with Google My Business

Google My Business isn’t just for sharing your products, hours, and location. As more local shops and restaurants reopen, it’s important to highlight health and safety measures. Greg Sterling goes over how to do this in this Search Engine Land post.

Learn from Experienced Bloggers

You don’t need a ton of experience to blog successfully. However, you can learn some valuable lessons from those who have blogged for years. In this Mixergy interview, Small Business Trends’ publisher Anita Campbell shares insights from her 17 years of blogging.

Adjust Your Facebook Strategy Based on Current Trends and Statistics

As social platforms change, it’s important to always keep up with trends and adjust your strategy accordingly. This Startup Bonsai post by Lindsay Liedke includes statistics and facts to help businesses learn more about Facebook. You can also see reaction to the post over on BizSugar.

Force a Midlife Crisis on Your Brand

Most people think of midlife crises as something that individuals go through. But brands can experience similar transitions. And it may even be beneficial to put your company through one. Daniel Burstein elaborates in this Target Marketing post.

Benefit from E-Learning

E-learning is especially common for kids in school right now. But small businesses can also take advantage of this concept. In this post on the Small Biz Daily blog, Nikola Djordjevic discusses how businesses can utilize e-learning.

If you’d like to suggest your favorite small business content to be considered for an upcoming community roundup, please send your news tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "10 Ways to Rethink Your Business Tools to Optimize Their Value" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Live Zoho Webinar is Just a Few Days Away

Small businesses face multiple challenges on their path to digital transformation. And one of the biggest ones is finding and implementing the right software and applications. The Zoho solution greatly simplifies this pain point by including more than 45 business applications in a single ecosystem. This means no compatibility issues and affordability.

If you want to find out more about the Zoho ecosystem, Brent Leary is going to be hosting a live event on Facebook to show you how you can leverage the opportunities Zoho has to offer. The event will have Zoho founder Sridhar Vembu along with Zoho Chief Evangelist Raju Vegesna and Anita Campbell, CEO of Small Business Trends.

The Zoho business applications provide solutions for:

  • Sales
  • Marketing
  • Support
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Productivity
  • Finance
  • Operations
  • HR
  • Business Process

So, from CRM to accounting, billing, mail, commerce, supply chain, and much more, you will be able to digitally transform your business with one company.

Click the button below and go to the Facebook page to participate in the Live Event on Sept. 29 at 10 a.m. ET.

Register Now



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

 

Small Business Expo 2020 - PHILADELPHIASmall Business Expo 2020 – PHILADELPHIA
October 28, 2020, Philadelphia, PA

Small Business Expo is a FREE one-day event to attend for small businesses to network, attend great business-growth workshops, build new business relationships, exchange ideas, shop from new vendors and learn from leading industry experts. If you are serious about starting or growing your business, Small Business Expo is a “must attend” event. Small Business Expo is the #1 Business to Business Networking Event for business owners, entrepreneurs, start-ups, decision-makers or anyone who works for a small business or is interested in starting a Small Business.


LinkUpConferenceShowLinkUpConferenceShow
November 12, 2020, Online

LinkUpConferenceShow (LUCS) is a digital networking conference that merges the incredibly dynamic worlds of tech and comedy to provide informative and personalized networking opportunities designed to help executives, entrepreneurs, business leaders and tech professionals grow and scale their businesses. LUCS is the tech conference that combines Silicon Valley insights with New York’s nonstop energy to bring the technology community a totally new virtual experience designed to inspire, engage and entertain.


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends.

You can see a full list of events, contest and award listings or post your own events by visiting the Small Business Events Calendar.

This article, "Live Zoho Webinar is Just a Few Days Away" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Live Zoho Webinar is Just a Few Days Away

Small businesses face multiple challenges on their path to digital transformation. And one of the biggest ones is finding and implementing the right software and applications. The Zoho solution greatly simplifies this pain point by including more than 45 business applications in a single ecosystem. This means no compatibility issues and affordability.

If you want to find out more about the Zoho ecosystem, Brent Leary is going to be hosting a live event on Facebook to show you how you can leverage the opportunities Zoho has to offer. The event will have Zoho founder Sridhar Vembu along with Zoho Chief Evangelist Raju Vegesna and Anita Campbell, CEO of Small Business Trends.

The Zoho business applications provide solutions for:

  • Sales
  • Marketing
  • Support
  • Communication
  • Collaboration
  • Productivity
  • Finance
  • Operations
  • HR
  • Business Process

So, from CRM to accounting, billing, mail, commerce, supply chain, and much more, you will be able to digitally transform your business with one company.

Click the button below and go to the Facebook page to participate in the Live Event on Sept. 29 at 10 a.m. ET.

Register Now



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

 

Small Business Expo 2020 - PHILADELPHIASmall Business Expo 2020 – PHILADELPHIA
October 28, 2020, Philadelphia, PA

Small Business Expo is a FREE one-day event to attend for small businesses to network, attend great business-growth workshops, build new business relationships, exchange ideas, shop from new vendors and learn from leading industry experts. If you are serious about starting or growing your business, Small Business Expo is a “must attend” event. Small Business Expo is the #1 Business to Business Networking Event for business owners, entrepreneurs, start-ups, decision-makers or anyone who works for a small business or is interested in starting a Small Business.


LinkUpConferenceShowLinkUpConferenceShow
November 12, 2020, Online

LinkUpConferenceShow (LUCS) is a digital networking conference that merges the incredibly dynamic worlds of tech and comedy to provide informative and personalized networking opportunities designed to help executives, entrepreneurs, business leaders and tech professionals grow and scale their businesses. LUCS is the tech conference that combines Silicon Valley insights with New York’s nonstop energy to bring the technology community a totally new virtual experience designed to inspire, engage and entertain.


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends.

You can see a full list of events, contest and award listings or post your own events by visiting the Small Business Events Calendar.

This article, "Live Zoho Webinar is Just a Few Days Away" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds