Take the Right Steps to Get Your Business Up and Running

geting-a-Business-up-and-Running.png

You have a great business idea, but do you know what steps to take to make your dream come true? Nellie Akalp, CEO of CorpNet.com will be holding a free webinar titled, Steps to Start Your Business, to teach you the steps necessary to legally start a business and get up and running on the right foot.

All you have to do is click the red button and register to attend the webinar on Oct 20, 2021, at 02:00 PM Eastern Time (U.S. and Canada).

 

Register Now



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

Win Corporate Clients: The Real Deal 2021Win Corporate Clients: The Real Deal 2021
October 4, 2021, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

What if you could rapidly scale your consulting, coaching, professional services, outsourcing, certified diverse company or other corporate supplier business with lucrative B2B clients…clients who buy from you month after month, year after year, with a well that never runs dry. That’s exactly what we’ll show you how to do when you join us!


WEBINAR: Steps to Start Your BusinessWEBINAR: Steps to Start Your Business
October 20, 2021, Online

Starting a business can be an exhilarating time, where everything seems full of potential and purpose. But navigating the logistics of launching a business can be daunting. In this webinar Nellie Akalp, CEO of CorpNet.com, will outline the steps necessary to legally start a business and get up and running on the right foot.


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends.

You can see a full list of events, contest and award listings or post your own events by visiting the Small Business Events Calendar.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "Take the Right Steps to Get Your Business Up and Running" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Take the Right Steps to Get Your Business Up and Running

geting-a-Business-up-and-Running.png

You have a great business idea, but do you know what steps to take to make your dream come true? Nellie Akalp, CEO of CorpNet.com will be holding a free webinar titled, Steps to Start Your Business, to teach you the steps necessary to legally start a business and get up and running on the right foot.

All you have to do is click the red button and register to attend the webinar on Oct 20, 2021, at 02:00 PM Eastern Time (U.S. and Canada).

 

Register Now



Featured Events, Contests and Awards

Win Corporate Clients: The Real Deal 2021Win Corporate Clients: The Real Deal 2021
October 4, 2021, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

What if you could rapidly scale your consulting, coaching, professional services, outsourcing, certified diverse company or other corporate supplier business with lucrative B2B clients…clients who buy from you month after month, year after year, with a well that never runs dry. That’s exactly what we’ll show you how to do when you join us!


WEBINAR: Steps to Start Your BusinessWEBINAR: Steps to Start Your Business
October 20, 2021, Online

Starting a business can be an exhilarating time, where everything seems full of potential and purpose. But navigating the logistics of launching a business can be daunting. In this webinar Nellie Akalp, CEO of CorpNet.com, will outline the steps necessary to legally start a business and get up and running on the right foot.


More Events

More Contests

This weekly listing of small business events, contests and awards is provided as a community service by Small Business Trends.

You can see a full list of events, contest and award listings or post your own events by visiting the Small Business Events Calendar.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "Take the Right Steps to Get Your Business Up and Running" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Go Beyond the Basics with These 10 Unique Online Marketing Tips

unique-online-marketing-tips.png

Nearly every business today uses some form of online marketing. So if you want your company to stand out, you need to think a bit differently. New platforms like Clubhouse and TikTok may help. Or you could find new strategies within your tried and true methods like SEO and email marketing. These tips from members of the online small business community can help you go beyond the basics to improve your online marketing.

Use Conversational Insights to Take the Guesswork Out of Marketing

Lots of businesses use keywords for their online marketing. But if you want to take your efforts to the next level, it’s necessary to go beyond simple keywords. Learn how conversational insights can help you go deeper in this Search Engine Watch post by Jacqueline Dooley.

Focus on Video in Your Online Marketing

Video has been a popular promotional and communication method for years. But some business owners still resist the format. If you need more reasons to focus on video this year, read this SMB CEO post by Ivan Widjaya. Then head over to BizSugar to read members’ comments.

Make Use of Public Relations

Public relations isn’t a new concept. But it hasn’t gotten as much attention in recent years as high tech marketing tactics like SEO and social media. However, it can still make a major impact. Learn how in this Duct Tape Marketing post and podcast by John Jantsch.

Focus on Digital Reputation Management

Many of today’s businesses focus on digital marketing. But it may be more useful to think of it as reputation management. After all, your online presence makes up a huge piece of your overall reputation. Read more about digital reputation management in this UpCity post by David J. Brin.

Consider These Affiliate Marketing Programs for Your Business

Affiliate marketing involves connecting businesses with influencers, businesses, or individuals who share their products or services. They can then earn small commissions on sales sent to the business. If you’re interested in using this tactic in 2021, check out this GetResponse post by John P. Lobrutto first.

Consider Joining Clubhouse

Clubhouse is a relatively new social platform. Some brands have jumped on the bandwagon early, while others have hung back. So which route is right for your business? Some experts weigh in on the Content Marketing Institute blog. Read this post by Ann Gynn for the details.

Gain More Visibility Online During the Pandemic

The pandemic has made things tough for a lot of businesses. But some businesses have been able to actually improve their online marketing efforts during this time. To make the most of a bad situation, read the tips in this Bright Local post by Jonathan Birch.

Get to Know These TikTok Stats

If you still haven’t tried using TikTok for your business, this may be the time to jump in. This Sprout Social post by Chloe West includes some stats that may entice marketers and provide insights for using the platform.

Improve Email Replies to Create Positive Customer Experiences

Email marketing has long been an important business strategy. But personalized communication is also important. If you want to make the most of this powerful communication method, read this Marketing Land post by Ryan Phelan.

Avoid Podfade When Promoting Your Podcast

Podcasting provides an exciting business strategy and/or promotional method. But if you want to make an actual impact, you need to publish regularly. Unfortunately, many podcasters suffer from a condition called podfade. Learn what it is and how to avoid it in this GMR Transcription post by Beth Worthy. Then see what members of the BizSugar community are saying about the post here.

If you’d like to suggest your favorite small business content to be considered for an upcoming community roundup, please send your news tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "Go Beyond the Basics with These 10 Unique Online Marketing Tips" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Go Beyond the Basics with These 10 Unique Online Marketing Tips

unique-online-marketing-tips.png

Nearly every business today uses some form of online marketing. So if you want your company to stand out, you need to think a bit differently. New platforms like Clubhouse and TikTok may help. Or you could find new strategies within your tried and true methods like SEO and email marketing. These tips from members of the online small business community can help you go beyond the basics to improve your online marketing.

Use Conversational Insights to Take the Guesswork Out of Marketing

Lots of businesses use keywords for their online marketing. But if you want to take your efforts to the next level, it’s necessary to go beyond simple keywords. Learn how conversational insights can help you go deeper in this Search Engine Watch post by Jacqueline Dooley.

Focus on Video in Your Online Marketing

Video has been a popular promotional and communication method for years. But some business owners still resist the format. If you need more reasons to focus on video this year, read this SMB CEO post by Ivan Widjaya. Then head over to BizSugar to read members’ comments.

Make Use of Public Relations

Public relations isn’t a new concept. But it hasn’t gotten as much attention in recent years as high tech marketing tactics like SEO and social media. However, it can still make a major impact. Learn how in this Duct Tape Marketing post and podcast by John Jantsch.

Focus on Digital Reputation Management

Many of today’s businesses focus on digital marketing. But it may be more useful to think of it as reputation management. After all, your online presence makes up a huge piece of your overall reputation. Read more about digital reputation management in this UpCity post by David J. Brin.

Consider These Affiliate Marketing Programs for Your Business

Affiliate marketing involves connecting businesses with influencers, businesses, or individuals who share their products or services. They can then earn small commissions on sales sent to the business. If you’re interested in using this tactic in 2021, check out this GetResponse post by John P. Lobrutto first.

Consider Joining Clubhouse

Clubhouse is a relatively new social platform. Some brands have jumped on the bandwagon early, while others have hung back. So which route is right for your business? Some experts weigh in on the Content Marketing Institute blog. Read this post by Ann Gynn for the details.

Gain More Visibility Online During the Pandemic

The pandemic has made things tough for a lot of businesses. But some businesses have been able to actually improve their online marketing efforts during this time. To make the most of a bad situation, read the tips in this Bright Local post by Jonathan Birch.

Get to Know These TikTok Stats

If you still haven’t tried using TikTok for your business, this may be the time to jump in. This Sprout Social post by Chloe West includes some stats that may entice marketers and provide insights for using the platform.

Improve Email Replies to Create Positive Customer Experiences

Email marketing has long been an important business strategy. But personalized communication is also important. If you want to make the most of this powerful communication method, read this Marketing Land post by Ryan Phelan.

Avoid Podfade When Promoting Your Podcast

Podcasting provides an exciting business strategy and/or promotional method. But if you want to make an actual impact, you need to publish regularly. Unfortunately, many podcasters suffer from a condition called podfade. Learn what it is and how to avoid it in this GMR Transcription post by Beth Worthy. Then see what members of the BizSugar community are saying about the post here.

If you’d like to suggest your favorite small business content to be considered for an upcoming community roundup, please send your news tips to: sbtips@gmail.com.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "Go Beyond the Basics with These 10 Unique Online Marketing Tips" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

Daddy-O of Stetsasonic: Even After Almost 40 Years I’m as Good a Rapper Now as I’ve Ever Been

daddy o stetsasonic

I may have mentioned before that I was a college DJ during the time when hip-hop music came of age.  And one of my favorite songs of the era was Sally, by the legendary hip-hop group Stetsasonic.  And years after my college DJ years (but I’m still a DJ…virtually at least) I had the opportunity to moderate a tech panel at Georgia Tech, and one of the panelists was Glenn Bolton, aka Daddy-O… co-founder of Stetsasonic.

It was great hearing Daddy-O talk about technology and his experiences in business and the impact modern tech has had on the creation process.  But at the time he hadn’t picked up the mic in a while.  But a few years ago I started seeing videos of Daddy-O rapping again.  And then I was on LinkedIn one morning and saw that he posted a sneak peek clip of Daddy-O and the whole Stetsasonic crew teasing a new song.  The fact that they hadn’t made an album/DVD is about 30 years but still sounding great really stopped me in my tracks.  And the fact that I saw this first on LinkedIn – and not YouTube – really stood out to me… that is after I came down from the excitement of seeing them all back together sounding and looking great after all these years!

In it was perfect timing as I had been catching up via DMs with Daddy-O and just had scheduled a time for a LinkedIn Live convo.  So below is an edited transcript of a portion of our conv where we talk about the early days of the band, why they got back in the studio together after all these years, and how he feels he’s better now than he was back in the heyday.   This was an extended conversation which you can here by clicking on the embedded SoundCloud player.

LinkedIn for Hip-Hop?

Brent Leary:  I just thought it was really cool that you dropped the little sneak peek on LinkedIn. 

Daddy-O:  I did put it out on Instagram as well. What happened with me in LinkedIn was I always used to use LinkedIn just for professional stuff. I got a little tech company on the side and we train doctors and stuff and technology and I was just doing that. But a lot of people who like what we do are sitting there on LinkedIn and I don’t have to feel bad about it. I don’t have to feel bad about my physical job resume being on LinkedIn. And my music is still me. So …

Better than Ever

Brent Leary:  I heard you say you’re a better rapper now than you’ve ever been.

Daddy-O:  I totally know I am. In 2016 I started making these records again, you know, physically making records again. And then when I did that, like I tell everybody,  the two people that I thought about was Miles Davis and and Jimmy Hendrix. And I just thought if Miles was here, would he tell somebody, man, just go, listen to Bitches Brew. You’ll hear what I’m about. Or would he do something new? And the proof is the last producer that made Miles Davis worked with was Easy Moe B; a hip hop guy who produced Tupac, Biggie, all of that. So, he already was pushing the envelope forward and I feel like Jimmy would be the same way if he had lived, he would just do something. He wouldn’t say, Hey, go listen to Purple Haze.  You know, he would do something new. 

So I thought about it long and hard between 2015 and 2016 and said, what am I doing? Not, not what am I doing? I think this is important. Not what am I doing to keep the lights on, but what am I doing with my talent? And I thought about it. I said, man, I don’t rap anymore. Right? If I just stopped rapping, all they gonna know me for is the old stuff. And that was way before some of the people that are big now were big. It’s going to evolve and I’m going to be stuck in a little bubble of like, I don’t know, ‘86 to like ‘91. And, and that’s not bad. Nothing is bad about that. It’s good to have classics. It’s great to, to be an artist and know that there’s at least one classic song that people love. That’s a great, great, great feeling. But as a rapper, I’m like, I’m going to get pushed to the back of the bus, you know, to be like the old man and the geriatric bus. And I didn’t want to be that. I just didn’t want to be that. I know I can’t do what Young Thug does. I know I can’t do what Rick Ross does, the younger guys they’re going to do what they do, but I thought there’s gotta be some line for me. There’s gotta be some opening for me. And so I took  my time and I just studied it and I trialed and errored. I figured it out. And I know that there’s a lane for classic hip hop.

Getting the group back together for the first time in 30 years

Daddy-O:  When I was ready, I presented it to Stetsasonic and was just like, look, man, this is a road that we could take, you know? And I’m glad I’m, I’m real proud of the guys. They picked up the mantle. They were like, “all right, we will see where you’re going with it. Show us what you want to do”. I showed them. And what they were writing right now is crazy, man. I heard The Light just kicked something to me the other day. He wants to do an interpretation of the Gamble and Huff – OJays Message in the Music. It was crazy. Like this is great. 

Brent Leary:  Let’s say you’re talking to one of the old school folks who do want to get back into it. What is the hardest part? Is it getting back into the production aspects of putting a song together? Is it going through what you might need to, to build an audience and using these social tools to promote the brand?

Daddy-O:  The first step I really feel solidly is acceptance because what I found with my peers sadly, but true, is they don’t really accept the art form today. There is some validity to that, right? One of my best friends always says they shouldn’t even call what they’re doing now, hip hop, they should call it something else. 

Brent Leary:  That’s kind of like the traditional “get off my lawn, It’s not as good as when I did it back in my yea”.  There is some validity.  There seems to be a certain particular sound that has taken over hip, right? And there’s not as much creativity today.

Daddy-O:  I think you can say there’s not as much creativity. You can say that. I mean, that’s proven due to laptop producing. That’s proven. Because it is evolution. Whether we want to believe Young Thug and everybody else that comes along with that group is evolution or not. It is evolution. It did evolve into that. Some people might say it’s all backwards; that’s another argument, right? But it is evolution. 

I think that the first step is acceptance. And what I mean by that is accepting that they are who they are and they can do what they do. Right. Then you figure out who you are. And that’s the hard part. Where is Daddy-O know pertinent to the conversation? Where does Stetsasonic fit in?

Defining success today

Brent Leary:  What does success look like to you now, compared to back in the day when you guys were very successful doing your own music and producing others, but how do you measure success now compared to back in the day?

Daddy-O: One of the things I will say, that’s kind of weird. It’s just a freaky turn of events most. I don’t call myself old-school because I, I came after Grandmaster Flash and them, who I was with the other day, too.  Most old-school cats make more on stage now than we ever did. So, weird turn of events. It’s like, we make more onstage now than we did in our heyday because of this uber demand for classic hip hop and, and nostalgia and all of that. 

I’ve been trying to convince my peers to make records, but now things are opening up again, pre COVID and now post COVID, a lot of them make more money now than they made in the past.  Maybe not on sales and particularly there’s still royalties there, but they go out on the road and they make a whole lot of money. So, so success kind of looks a little different to everybody because for them, success is just having a good tour and going out on a few days, some guys are going out only on the weekends, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Friday, Saturday, Sunday, making anywhere between four and 10 grand a night that ain’t nothing to shake a stick at. That’s sweet. And most of them are making $7,500 to $14,000 a night.

Success for me right now is exactly what happened to you this morning. I don’t care if it was two people, which is way more than two, but I don’t care if it’s two people when they either got up or they saw it late last night when I posted it, they looked at it and they said, man, that’s my guy. That’s my guy. And these are guys that haven’t made a record in over 30 years. 

Focus of today’s artist

Brent Leary:  Do you think that because of the ease of production that instead of focusing their efforts on the craft of creating music, they’re almost focused on the craft of branding and promotion?

Daddy-O:  That’s absolutely true. What you’re talking about is what I described as the making of a masterpiece, right? So, you know, you look at Dr. Dre’s Chronic, or you look at Public Enemy, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, or you look at Stetsasonic In Full Gear. This was all a making of a masterpiece, right? So it’s all trial-and-error, figuring out sounds getting in features, even if you get in features how you fit those features in; we’re recording on two inch tape. So that’s a whole other thing, right? Recording on two inch tape versus this digital recording that we do now in DAW is a totally different thing. So that being almost extinct, it does make people concentrate more on brand.

Best year in hip-hop

Brent Leary:  So I have to ask, why do you think 1988 was the best year in hip-hop?

Daddy-O:  I just think sonically, it culminated everything. I think ‘86 was great. That’s where we saw the introduction to Salt-N-Pepa and a few other people. And then ‘87 was almost the year, Eric B and Rakim. But by the time ‘88 came, we had all come to the conclusion of knowing how to make records. If you think about it, Public Enemy had a first album and Yo Bum Rush the Show, and I’ll just use us too. Stetsasonic had a first album On Fire, great records. And for some purists, those are the best records in the world. They still take those records over anything else we made, but by the time ‘88 came around, we understood more things about the studio. We had been on the road, at least for a trial run for us and Public Enemy was more than a trial run cause LL cool J took us out. 

So we went on the Def jam tour. We just learned and got our footing in the music business; what we were going to be as recording artists. So by the time we all came around, most of us had made those sophomore records. Those records were perfect because sonically, we knew where it was at. And I don’t know if any year could even compete with the Sonics of ‘88 because, let’s face it Puffy with Bad Boy makes good records. But for the most part they are loud, right? So they might not be as good as they are loud because by that time they figured out how to turn volume up in the mastering studio. But as good as those Biggie records sound, if you put it up against a Public Enemy track, it’s not going to fair off sonically. The Public Enemy track is still going to eat it because we got our groove then. 

Here’s the other part of by ’88; when something is – and software engineers can identify with this – when something is planned and experimental, that’s what makes us super dope.

This article, "Daddy-O of Stetsasonic: Even After Almost 40 Years I’m as Good a Rapper Now as I’ve Ever Been" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

Daddy-O of Stetsasonic: Even After Almost 40 Years I’m as Good a Rapper Now as I’ve Ever Been

daddy o stetsasonic

I may have mentioned before that I was a college DJ during the time when hip-hop music came of age.  And one of my favorite songs of the era was Sally, by the legendary hip-hop group Stetsasonic.  And years after my college DJ years (but I’m still a DJ…virtually at least) I had the opportunity to moderate a tech panel at Georgia Tech, and one of the panelists was Glenn Bolton, aka Daddy-O… co-founder of Stetsasonic.

It was great hearing Daddy-O talk about technology and his experiences in business and the impact modern tech has had on the creation process.  But at the time he hadn’t picked up the mic in a while.  But a few years ago I started seeing videos of Daddy-O rapping again.  And then I was on LinkedIn one morning and saw that he posted a sneak peek clip of Daddy-O and the whole Stetsasonic crew teasing a new song.  The fact that they hadn’t made an album/DVD is about 30 years but still sounding great really stopped me in my tracks.  And the fact that I saw this first on LinkedIn – and not YouTube – really stood out to me… that is after I came down from the excitement of seeing them all back together sounding and looking great after all these years!

In it was perfect timing as I had been catching up via DMs with Daddy-O and just had scheduled a time for a LinkedIn Live convo.  So below is an edited transcript of a portion of our conv where we talk about the early days of the band, why they got back in the studio together after all these years, and how he feels he’s better now than he was back in the heyday.   This was an extended conversation which you can here by clicking on the embedded SoundCloud player.

LinkedIn for Hip-Hop?

Brent Leary:  I just thought it was really cool that you dropped the little sneak peek on LinkedIn. 

Daddy-O:  I did put it out on Instagram as well. What happened with me in LinkedIn was I always used to use LinkedIn just for professional stuff. I got a little tech company on the side and we train doctors and stuff and technology and I was just doing that. But a lot of people who like what we do are sitting there on LinkedIn and I don’t have to feel bad about it. I don’t have to feel bad about my physical job resume being on LinkedIn. And my music is still me. So …

Better than Ever

Brent Leary:  I heard you say you’re a better rapper now than you’ve ever been.

Daddy-O:  I totally know I am. In 2016 I started making these records again, you know, physically making records again. And then when I did that, like I tell everybody,  the two people that I thought about was Miles Davis and and Jimmy Hendrix. And I just thought if Miles was here, would he tell somebody, man, just go, listen to Bitches Brew. You’ll hear what I’m about. Or would he do something new? And the proof is the last producer that made Miles Davis worked with was Easy Moe B; a hip hop guy who produced Tupac, Biggie, all of that. So, he already was pushing the envelope forward and I feel like Jimmy would be the same way if he had lived, he would just do something. He wouldn’t say, Hey, go listen to Purple Haze.  You know, he would do something new. 

So I thought about it long and hard between 2015 and 2016 and said, what am I doing? Not, not what am I doing? I think this is important. Not what am I doing to keep the lights on, but what am I doing with my talent? And I thought about it. I said, man, I don’t rap anymore. Right? If I just stopped rapping, all they gonna know me for is the old stuff. And that was way before some of the people that are big now were big. It’s going to evolve and I’m going to be stuck in a little bubble of like, I don’t know, ‘86 to like ‘91. And, and that’s not bad. Nothing is bad about that. It’s good to have classics. It’s great to, to be an artist and know that there’s at least one classic song that people love. That’s a great, great, great feeling. But as a rapper, I’m like, I’m going to get pushed to the back of the bus, you know, to be like the old man and the geriatric bus. And I didn’t want to be that. I just didn’t want to be that. I know I can’t do what Young Thug does. I know I can’t do what Rick Ross does, the younger guys they’re going to do what they do, but I thought there’s gotta be some line for me. There’s gotta be some opening for me. And so I took  my time and I just studied it and I trialed and errored. I figured it out. And I know that there’s a lane for classic hip hop.

Getting the group back together for the first time in 30 years

Daddy-O:  When I was ready, I presented it to Stetsasonic and was just like, look, man, this is a road that we could take, you know? And I’m glad I’m, I’m real proud of the guys. They picked up the mantle. They were like, “all right, we will see where you’re going with it. Show us what you want to do”. I showed them. And what they were writing right now is crazy, man. I heard The Light just kicked something to me the other day. He wants to do an interpretation of the Gamble and Huff – OJays Message in the Music. It was crazy. Like this is great. 

Brent Leary:  Let’s say you’re talking to one of the old school folks who do want to get back into it. What is the hardest part? Is it getting back into the production aspects of putting a song together? Is it going through what you might need to, to build an audience and using these social tools to promote the brand?

Daddy-O:  The first step I really feel solidly is acceptance because what I found with my peers sadly, but true, is they don’t really accept the art form today. There is some validity to that, right? One of my best friends always says they shouldn’t even call what they’re doing now, hip hop, they should call it something else. 

Brent Leary:  That’s kind of like the traditional “get off my lawn, It’s not as good as when I did it back in my yea”.  There is some validity.  There seems to be a certain particular sound that has taken over hip, right? And there’s not as much creativity today.

Daddy-O:  I think you can say there’s not as much creativity. You can say that. I mean, that’s proven due to laptop producing. That’s proven. Because it is evolution. Whether we want to believe Young Thug and everybody else that comes along with that group is evolution or not. It is evolution. It did evolve into that. Some people might say it’s all backwards; that’s another argument, right? But it is evolution. 

I think that the first step is acceptance. And what I mean by that is accepting that they are who they are and they can do what they do. Right. Then you figure out who you are. And that’s the hard part. Where is Daddy-O know pertinent to the conversation? Where does Stetsasonic fit in?

Defining success today

Brent Leary:  What does success look like to you now, compared to back in the day when you guys were very successful doing your own music and producing others, but how do you measure success now compared to back in the day?

Daddy-O: One of the things I will say, that’s kind of weird. It’s just a freaky turn of events most. I don’t call myself old-school because I, I came after Grandmaster Flash and them, who I was with the other day, too.  Most old-school cats make more on stage now than we ever did. So, weird turn of events. It’s like, we make more onstage now than we did in our heyday because of this uber demand for classic hip hop and, and nostalgia and all of that. 

I’ve been trying to convince my peers to make records, but now things are opening up again, pre COVID and now post COVID, a lot of them make more money now than they made in the past.  Maybe not on sales and particularly there’s still royalties there, but they go out on the road and they make a whole lot of money. So, so success kind of looks a little different to everybody because for them, success is just having a good tour and going out on a few days, some guys are going out only on the weekends, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Friday, Saturday, Sunday, making anywhere between four and 10 grand a night that ain’t nothing to shake a stick at. That’s sweet. And most of them are making $7,500 to $14,000 a night.

Success for me right now is exactly what happened to you this morning. I don’t care if it was two people, which is way more than two, but I don’t care if it’s two people when they either got up or they saw it late last night when I posted it, they looked at it and they said, man, that’s my guy. That’s my guy. And these are guys that haven’t made a record in over 30 years. 

Focus of today’s artist

Brent Leary:  Do you think that because of the ease of production that instead of focusing their efforts on the craft of creating music, they’re almost focused on the craft of branding and promotion?

Daddy-O:  That’s absolutely true. What you’re talking about is what I described as the making of a masterpiece, right? So, you know, you look at Dr. Dre’s Chronic, or you look at Public Enemy, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, or you look at Stetsasonic In Full Gear. This was all a making of a masterpiece, right? So it’s all trial-and-error, figuring out sounds getting in features, even if you get in features how you fit those features in; we’re recording on two inch tape. So that’s a whole other thing, right? Recording on two inch tape versus this digital recording that we do now in DAW is a totally different thing. So that being almost extinct, it does make people concentrate more on brand.

Best year in hip-hop

Brent Leary:  So I have to ask, why do you think 1988 was the best year in hip-hop?

Daddy-O:  I just think sonically, it culminated everything. I think ‘86 was great. That’s where we saw the introduction to Salt-N-Pepa and a few other people. And then ‘87 was almost the year, Eric B and Rakim. But by the time ‘88 came, we had all come to the conclusion of knowing how to make records. If you think about it, Public Enemy had a first album and Yo Bum Rush the Show, and I’ll just use us too. Stetsasonic had a first album On Fire, great records. And for some purists, those are the best records in the world. They still take those records over anything else we made, but by the time ‘88 came around, we understood more things about the studio. We had been on the road, at least for a trial run for us and Public Enemy was more than a trial run cause LL cool J took us out. 

So we went on the Def jam tour. We just learned and got our footing in the music business; what we were going to be as recording artists. So by the time we all came around, most of us had made those sophomore records. Those records were perfect because sonically, we knew where it was at. And I don’t know if any year could even compete with the Sonics of ‘88 because, let’s face it Puffy with Bad Boy makes good records. But for the most part they are loud, right? So they might not be as good as they are loud because by that time they figured out how to turn volume up in the mastering studio. But as good as those Biggie records sound, if you put it up against a Public Enemy track, it’s not going to fair off sonically. The Public Enemy track is still going to eat it because we got our groove then. 

Here’s the other part of by ’88; when something is – and software engineers can identify with this – when something is planned and experimental, that’s what makes us super dope.

This article, "Daddy-O of Stetsasonic: Even After Almost 40 Years I’m as Good a Rapper Now as I’ve Ever Been" was first published on Small Business Trends



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76% of Employees Think You’re Spying on Their Communications

surveillance-on-employees.png

A large number of remote workers in the United States are worried that their communications are being secretly monitored by their employers.

A US-centered analysis of Google Search Trends revealed the top HR-related queries are related to privacy and surveillance when working from home. The research was conducted by Elements Global and discovered three quarters of remote workers fear that Big Brother is watching them.

Such a trend is a concern for small businesses which often have much more personal relationships between employers and employees. Distrust and resentment are bad for morale, and this is on top of the pandemic, which has already taken quite a toll on employees.

Employees Think You’re Spying on Them

The research began with a list of more than 300 common HR-related questions. They then narrowed the list down to the top 50 most commonly searched questions. These questions were then sorted into related categories, with privacy and surveillance being two of the categories featuring the most frequently asked questions.

Georgina Coleman at Elements Global explained: “Trust is a central dynamic in employer-employee relationships. Employees have a lot of questions about the limitations of their privacy and the extent to which they are monitored by employers. As our data will show below, employers have reasons to be concerned too.”

The trust issues were further emphasized by the data accompanying the above statement. It revealed that 49% of workers neglect to make reports to HR out of fear of retaliation. Two out of three workers also stated that they don’t report issues to HR because they don’t believe any action will be taken.

Employers Tracking Employees

Speaking directly about the privacy and surveillance concerns, Coleman added: “No matter where you work, there are countless ways an employer can track what you’re doing and how often you’re doing it.

“Of the workers we surveyed, 74% of those who work remotely are concerned about their employer monitoring when and how much they work, and 76% of workers who use a computer are concerned about their employer monitoring their communications.”

Additional findings in the research revealed that 53% of workers admitted to deleting Slacks and other messages so their employer couldn’t see them. A further 64% admitted to deleting their browsing history to hide their lack of productivity.

Privacy and Surveillance Survey Questions

The most frequently asked privacy questions included queries as to whether employers could share salary or FMLA information with other employees. The most frequently asked surveillance question by workers was whether or not an employer could monitor their personal computer. They also asked if their personal phones and laptop location could be tracked by their employer.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "76% of Employees Think You’re Spying on Their Communications" was first published on Small Business Trends



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In the News: Small Businesses Get $145.7B in Prime Contracts from the Federal Government

Contracts-from-the-Federal-Government.png

When small businesses are awarded contracts from the federal government, it pays off in many different ways. And that is what just happened with the record $145.7 billion in prime contracts for small businesses. According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), the $145.7 billion from prime contracts along with another $82.8 billion in subcontracts given to small businesses was responsible for creating almost one million jobs.

This article Federal Government Awards Record $145.7 Billion in Contracts to Small Business, in this week’s roundup looks at the effort the SBA and the federal government put to award at least 23% of the contracts to small businesses. But this year, they awarded  26.01% of the overall federal contracts, which exceeds the mandated 23% in prime contracts.

The roundup also looks at a couple of important issues for small businesses this week, the implementation of Google Ads’ three-strike system on publishers, which will affect many small business owners, and the tax considerations of selling a business.

 

Small Business News Roundup – July 30, 2021

See what the rest of the roundup has to offer this week:

Office Workers Among Those Most Likely to Favor Smart Lockers to Get Packages Securely

According to a new study from Pitney Bowes, office workers are the most likely to favor smart lockers to get packages securely. Millennials and urban dwellers are also part of this group that sees the benefit of using smart lockers. Office Workers and Smart Lockers As employers and employees look for ways to optimize the workplace the work/business environment is changing.

Google Ads Imposing 3 Strike System on Publishers

Come September 2021, Google is going to be testing a new strike-based pilot program for repeat Google Ads policies violators. The three-strike ad policy system will have increasing levels of penalty, but before the strikes, you will first get a warning.

1 in 4 Entrepreneurs Fail at Their Business Before Succeeding

1 in 4 entrepreneurs fails at least once before succeeding. It takes entrepreneurs an average of three years for their business to begin supporting them financially. These somewhat blunt statistics involving entrepreneurialism were the findings of a study by Skynova, a small business resource for creating professional invoices.

American Workers Take 2.7 Hours of Breaks Daily – What are They Doing?

Taking regular breaks is vital for workers to stay focused, productive and alert, but is the US workforce taking too many breaks? According to research by Solitaired, providers of activities to help sustain healthy bodies and minds, workers in the US take an average of 2.7 hours of breaks each day.

74% of Consumers Prefer Texting with Businesses if a Real Person is Texting Back

Almost three-quarters of consumers prefer texting as a means of communicating with businesses, providing a real person is texting back. This was the finding of the communication and payment for local business providers, Podium’s, 2021 Local Business Messaging Trends report.

Zoho Invoice is Now Free to Empower Small Businesses

Taking any cost of the expense sheet for a small business is always a great thing. And this makes the announcement of Zoho Invoice being available for free even better. Why, because this is a proven cloud-based invoicing solution with more than 30 real-time reports so you can easily navigate the billing and payment collection process.

Entrepreneurs Often Lack Marketing Help When Starting a Business

Launching a business is not without its challenges, and the more help, support and advice entrepreneurs receive, the likelier they are to succeed. This was the finding of a report by Skynova, a small business resource for creating professional invoices using an online platform.

Selling a Business Tax Considerations

If you’re concerned about taking a tax hit when you sell your business, get a business valuation done. The business valuation is an appraisal that can help you set your price. It can also help you estimate the tax impact ahead of time. It may also bring to light ways you can lessen that impact. We’ll take you through all you need to know.

Why Thinking Outside the Box is Useless

One of my favorite expressions is “there is no truth outside yourself”. We need to realize that everything we see in the world is viewed through our own point of view. What is the implications of that positively and negatively for your business? On the Small Business Radio Show this week, Kenneth Cukier is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author.

What is 3D Printing?

3D printing is an additive process in which three-dimensional objects are made from digital files. It entails laying down a series of layers of material until the object is created. This innovative production process uses materials like plastic, ceramic, metal, or any other material to make complex shapes.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "In the News: Small Businesses Get $145.7B in Prime Contracts from the Federal Government" was first published on Small Business Trends



RSS Business Feeds

76% of Employees Think You’re Spying on Their Communications

surveillance-on-employees.png

A large number of remote workers in the United States are worried that their communications are being secretly monitored by their employers.

A US-centered analysis of Google Search Trends revealed the top HR-related queries are related to privacy and surveillance when working from home. The research was conducted by Elements Global and discovered three quarters of remote workers fear that Big Brother is watching them.

Such a trend is a concern for small businesses which often have much more personal relationships between employers and employees. Distrust and resentment are bad for morale, and this is on top of the pandemic, which has already taken quite a toll on employees.

Employees Think You’re Spying on Them

The research began with a list of more than 300 common HR-related questions. They then narrowed the list down to the top 50 most commonly searched questions. These questions were then sorted into related categories, with privacy and surveillance being two of the categories featuring the most frequently asked questions.

Georgina Coleman at Elements Global explained: “Trust is a central dynamic in employer-employee relationships. Employees have a lot of questions about the limitations of their privacy and the extent to which they are monitored by employers. As our data will show below, employers have reasons to be concerned too.”

The trust issues were further emphasized by the data accompanying the above statement. It revealed that 49% of workers neglect to make reports to HR out of fear of retaliation. Two out of three workers also stated that they don’t report issues to HR because they don’t believe any action will be taken.

Employers Tracking Employees

Speaking directly about the privacy and surveillance concerns, Coleman added: “No matter where you work, there are countless ways an employer can track what you’re doing and how often you’re doing it.

“Of the workers we surveyed, 74% of those who work remotely are concerned about their employer monitoring when and how much they work, and 76% of workers who use a computer are concerned about their employer monitoring their communications.”

Additional findings in the research revealed that 53% of workers admitted to deleting Slacks and other messages so their employer couldn’t see them. A further 64% admitted to deleting their browsing history to hide their lack of productivity.

Privacy and Surveillance Survey Questions

The most frequently asked privacy questions included queries as to whether employers could share salary or FMLA information with other employees. The most frequently asked surveillance question by workers was whether or not an employer could monitor their personal computer. They also asked if their personal phones and laptop location could be tracked by their employer.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "76% of Employees Think You’re Spying on Their Communications" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds

In the News: Small Businesses Get $145.7B in Prime Contracts from the Federal Government

Contracts-from-the-Federal-Government.png

When small businesses are awarded contracts from the federal government, it pays off in many different ways. And that is what just happened with the record $145.7 billion in prime contracts for small businesses. According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), the $145.7 billion from prime contracts along with another $82.8 billion in subcontracts given to small businesses was responsible for creating almost one million jobs.

This article Federal Government Awards Record $145.7 Billion in Contracts to Small Business, in this week’s roundup looks at the effort the SBA and the federal government put to award at least 23% of the contracts to small businesses. But this year, they awarded  26.01% of the overall federal contracts, which exceeds the mandated 23% in prime contracts.

The roundup also looks at a couple of important issues for small businesses this week, the implementation of Google Ads’ three-strike system on publishers, which will affect many small business owners, and the tax considerations of selling a business.

 

Small Business News Roundup – July 30, 2021

See what the rest of the roundup has to offer this week:

Office Workers Among Those Most Likely to Favor Smart Lockers to Get Packages Securely

According to a new study from Pitney Bowes, office workers are the most likely to favor smart lockers to get packages securely. Millennials and urban dwellers are also part of this group that sees the benefit of using smart lockers. Office Workers and Smart Lockers As employers and employees look for ways to optimize the workplace the work/business environment is changing.

Google Ads Imposing 3 Strike System on Publishers

Come September 2021, Google is going to be testing a new strike-based pilot program for repeat Google Ads policies violators. The three-strike ad policy system will have increasing levels of penalty, but before the strikes, you will first get a warning.

1 in 4 Entrepreneurs Fail at Their Business Before Succeeding

1 in 4 entrepreneurs fails at least once before succeeding. It takes entrepreneurs an average of three years for their business to begin supporting them financially. These somewhat blunt statistics involving entrepreneurialism were the findings of a study by Skynova, a small business resource for creating professional invoices.

American Workers Take 2.7 Hours of Breaks Daily – What are They Doing?

Taking regular breaks is vital for workers to stay focused, productive and alert, but is the US workforce taking too many breaks? According to research by Solitaired, providers of activities to help sustain healthy bodies and minds, workers in the US take an average of 2.7 hours of breaks each day.

74% of Consumers Prefer Texting with Businesses if a Real Person is Texting Back

Almost three-quarters of consumers prefer texting as a means of communicating with businesses, providing a real person is texting back. This was the finding of the communication and payment for local business providers, Podium’s, 2021 Local Business Messaging Trends report.

Zoho Invoice is Now Free to Empower Small Businesses

Taking any cost of the expense sheet for a small business is always a great thing. And this makes the announcement of Zoho Invoice being available for free even better. Why, because this is a proven cloud-based invoicing solution with more than 30 real-time reports so you can easily navigate the billing and payment collection process.

Entrepreneurs Often Lack Marketing Help When Starting a Business

Launching a business is not without its challenges, and the more help, support and advice entrepreneurs receive, the likelier they are to succeed. This was the finding of a report by Skynova, a small business resource for creating professional invoices using an online platform.

Selling a Business Tax Considerations

If you’re concerned about taking a tax hit when you sell your business, get a business valuation done. The business valuation is an appraisal that can help you set your price. It can also help you estimate the tax impact ahead of time. It may also bring to light ways you can lessen that impact. We’ll take you through all you need to know.

Why Thinking Outside the Box is Useless

One of my favorite expressions is “there is no truth outside yourself”. We need to realize that everything we see in the world is viewed through our own point of view. What is the implications of that positively and negatively for your business? On the Small Business Radio Show this week, Kenneth Cukier is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author.

What is 3D Printing?

3D printing is an additive process in which three-dimensional objects are made from digital files. It entails laying down a series of layers of material until the object is created. This innovative production process uses materials like plastic, ceramic, metal, or any other material to make complex shapes.

Image: Depositphotos

This article, "In the News: Small Businesses Get $145.7B in Prime Contracts from the Federal Government" was first published on Small Business Trends



via Small Business Trends Business Feeds