Best Commercial Laundry Carts

If you run a small hotel, uniformed-based business, a restaurant, or any other business where you do a lot of laundry, a commercial-grade laundry cart is essential.

A quality laundry cart will help move large amounts of dry and wet garments thus saving you and your employees valuable time and effort. This means they do not have to lug around dirty laundry, which makes it hygienic. And when it is wet, they will not have to carry the heavy load.

When you have the right tool, the job you are doing becomes that much easier. And if you happen to do a lot of laundry in your business, a commercial-grade laundry cart will make this possible. Here are some of the best commercial laundry carts for your business.

 

Best Commercial Laundry Carts

 

Rubbermaid Collapsible X-Cart

Top Pick: With the load capacity of up to 220 pounds, this collapsible cart will haul a lot of laundry. And when you are not using it, the collapsed size is 75% smaller. It is made with a solid stainless-steel powder coated frame that will not rust along with the premium swivel caster wheels with bumper guards for easy maneuverability. You can also get a cart cover and replacement bags as needed.

Rubbermaid Commercial Collapsible X-Cart, Steel, 8 Bushel Cart

Buy on Amazon

CART&SUPPLY Coin Laundry Cart

Runner Up: This cart has a premium steel construction with a dual support valet bar for loading and unloading the laundry. The wheels (patent pending) are covered to protect against threads and other fabric from getting tangled. And impact-resistant covers protect corners and rims from run-ins with machines, walls, and other objects.

CART&SUPPLY Coin Laundry Cart, Heavy Duty, Rolling Cart

Buy on Amazon

 

Seville Classics Commercial Canvas Laundry Hamper

Best Value: With a capacity of 100 pounds, this is a small form factor laundry cart for heavy-duty commercial use. It has a tubular steel frame and polyester canvas laundry bag with reinforced opening and thick canvas handles. A tapered square feet design keeps the four wheels within the body to avoid damaging them.

Seville Classics Commercial Heavy-Duty Canvas Laundry Hamper with Wheels

Buy on Amazon

 

Cart&Supply Commercial Cart with U-Handle

Coming from the same company as the runner up, this cart has the same premium construction. This includes the steel construction and the patent-pending axel-guard wheels. The difference is, this unit has a large U- handle to push the cart around easily.

Cart&Supply Heavy Duty Household & Commercial Cart with U-Handle

Buy on Amazon

 

Whitmor Commercial Removable Liner

The design of this round laundry cart is ideal for small hotels, B&Bs and salons. It has a strong chromed metal frame with commercial grade swivel wheels. The bag has fabric tab fasteners instead of Velcro for added security. And it comes with a warranty from the manufacturer, which has been in business for 70 years.

Whitmor Round Commercial Removable Liner and Heavy Duty Wheels

Buy on Amazon

 

8 Bushel Capacity Laundry Truck

This is yet another heavy-duty cart. It is made with a powder-coated steel frame and welded construction. The bag is a durable vinyl/nylon laminate liner with fire retardant and steel grommets to attach it to the cart. The swivel casters include two fixed and two swivel wheels.

8 Bushel Capacity Laundry Basket Truck

Buy on Amazon

 

Rubbermaid Commercial Laundry Cube Truck

The medium-density polyethylene material of this cart sits on a diamond caster pattern so you can easily move it around. At 50 pounds it is heavy, but it is designed for long-lasting heavy-duty use. This design will ensure nothing leaks out of the laundry cart. It also protects what is inside from getting wet.

Rubbermaid Commercial MDPE 102.9-Gallon Laundry and Waste Collection Cube Truck

Buy on Amazon

 

Choosing Your Commercial Laundry Cart

As a small business, value is a must with each purchase. Whether it is a laundry cart or another product, it must work well and last a long time. When buying a laundry cart, look at these features to ensure you are making a well-informed purchase.

  • Size: How much laundry is your business handling? Based on this you should look at carts that can cope with the workload. You should do this considering you need a place to store and move the dirty and clean laundry around.
  • Durability: Quality construction with steel frames is a must. Make sure to also look for replacement options for the bag and other parts.
  • Mobility: Look for good quality wheels that are covered so they do not get any cloth, lint or thread tangled in them.
  • Style: Laundry carts come in all shapes and sizes. If the cart is going to be part of your customer-facing equipment choose a nice-looking cart. If on the other hand, it is going to remain in the laundry room, it can be utilitarian, which means you will probably pay less.
  • Cost and Warranty: Depending on how much you spend on your laundry cart, the warranty will become an issue. Look for a reputable brand that provides a warranty if you spend a lot of money on your cart.

When you are ready to buy a laundry cart lookout for these features and suggestions so you will end up with the best equipment for your business.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

This article, "Best Commercial Laundry Carts" was first published on Small Business Trends



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Best Commercial Laundry Carts

If you run a small hotel, uniformed-based business, a restaurant, or any other business where you do a lot of laundry, a commercial-grade laundry cart is essential.

A quality laundry cart will help move large amounts of dry and wet garments thus saving you and your employees valuable time and effort. This means they do not have to lug around dirty laundry, which makes it hygienic. And when it is wet, they will not have to carry the heavy load.

When you have the right tool, the job you are doing becomes that much easier. And if you happen to do a lot of laundry in your business, a commercial-grade laundry cart will make this possible. Here are some of the best commercial laundry carts for your business.

 

Best Commercial Laundry Carts

 

Rubbermaid Collapsible X-Cart

Top Pick: With the load capacity of up to 220 pounds, this collapsible cart will haul a lot of laundry. And when you are not using it, the collapsed size is 75% smaller. It is made with a solid stainless-steel powder coated frame that will not rust along with the premium swivel caster wheels with bumper guards for easy maneuverability. You can also get a cart cover and replacement bags as needed.

Rubbermaid Commercial Collapsible X-Cart, Steel, 8 Bushel Cart

Buy on Amazon

CART&SUPPLY Coin Laundry Cart

Runner Up: This cart has a premium steel construction with a dual support valet bar for loading and unloading the laundry. The wheels (patent pending) are covered to protect against threads and other fabric from getting tangled. And impact-resistant covers protect corners and rims from run-ins with machines, walls, and other objects.

CART&SUPPLY Coin Laundry Cart, Heavy Duty, Rolling Cart

Buy on Amazon

 

Seville Classics Commercial Canvas Laundry Hamper

Best Value: With a capacity of 100 pounds, this is a small form factor laundry cart for heavy-duty commercial use. It has a tubular steel frame and polyester canvas laundry bag with reinforced opening and thick canvas handles. A tapered square feet design keeps the four wheels within the body to avoid damaging them.

Seville Classics Commercial Heavy-Duty Canvas Laundry Hamper with Wheels

Buy on Amazon

 

Cart&Supply Commercial Cart with U-Handle

Coming from the same company as the runner up, this cart has the same premium construction. This includes the steel construction and the patent-pending axel-guard wheels. The difference is, this unit has a large U- handle to push the cart around easily.

Cart&Supply Heavy Duty Household & Commercial Cart with U-Handle

Buy on Amazon

 

Whitmor Commercial Removable Liner

The design of this round laundry cart is ideal for small hotels, B&Bs and salons. It has a strong chromed metal frame with commercial grade swivel wheels. The bag has fabric tab fasteners instead of Velcro for added security. And it comes with a warranty from the manufacturer, which has been in business for 70 years.

Whitmor Round Commercial Removable Liner and Heavy Duty Wheels

Buy on Amazon

 

8 Bushel Capacity Laundry Truck

This is yet another heavy-duty cart. It is made with a powder-coated steel frame and welded construction. The bag is a durable vinyl/nylon laminate liner with fire retardant and steel grommets to attach it to the cart. The swivel casters include two fixed and two swivel wheels.

8 Bushel Capacity Laundry Basket Truck

Buy on Amazon

 

Rubbermaid Commercial Laundry Cube Truck

The medium-density polyethylene material of this cart sits on a diamond caster pattern so you can easily move it around. At 50 pounds it is heavy, but it is designed for long-lasting heavy-duty use. This design will ensure nothing leaks out of the laundry cart. It also protects what is inside from getting wet.

Rubbermaid Commercial MDPE 102.9-Gallon Laundry and Waste Collection Cube Truck

Buy on Amazon

 

Choosing Your Commercial Laundry Cart

As a small business, value is a must with each purchase. Whether it is a laundry cart or another product, it must work well and last a long time. When buying a laundry cart, look at these features to ensure you are making a well-informed purchase.

  • Size: How much laundry is your business handling? Based on this you should look at carts that can cope with the workload. You should do this considering you need a place to store and move the dirty and clean laundry around.
  • Durability: Quality construction with steel frames is a must. Make sure to also look for replacement options for the bag and other parts.
  • Mobility: Look for good quality wheels that are covered so they do not get any cloth, lint or thread tangled in them.
  • Style: Laundry carts come in all shapes and sizes. If the cart is going to be part of your customer-facing equipment choose a nice-looking cart. If on the other hand, it is going to remain in the laundry room, it can be utilitarian, which means you will probably pay less.
  • Cost and Warranty: Depending on how much you spend on your laundry cart, the warranty will become an issue. Look for a reputable brand that provides a warranty if you spend a lot of money on your cart.

When you are ready to buy a laundry cart lookout for these features and suggestions so you will end up with the best equipment for your business.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

This article, "Best Commercial Laundry Carts" was first published on Small Business Trends



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30 Best Candle Business Stores on Etsy

30 Best Candle Business Stores on Etsy

Americans spend more than $3 billion on candles each year. This means that candle making can be a profitable endeavor for those interested in starting a business.

In fact, some entrepreneurs can earn a decent living by making them right in their own homes. You can then sell them at local craft fairs or retail stores. Or you can get started quickly using marketplace sites like Etsy.

Candle Businesses on Etsy

If you want to start a business around candle making, from home or elsewhere, it’s time to gather some inspiration from other sellers. These candle businesses have made a name for themselves on Etsy.

1. Frostbeard

Frostbeard is full of soy candles made for book lovers. Scents include unique options like Sherlock Study and Oxford Library. Owners Roxie and Tom Lubanovic started the business selling ceramics back in 2012. But they eventually shifted to candles after Roxie was unable to find bookish products elsewhere online.

2. 2 Sisters Candle Co.

The 2 Sisters Candle Co is a business that sells soy candles in various scents, like pumpkin black raspberry vanilla, ocean, and cinnamon stick. And the company is run by — you guessed it: two sisters.

Lynda Holden and her twin sister Laura started and run the business together while also babysitting their grandkids.

Holden told Small Business Trends, “We started making candles for ourselves and to give as gifts. When our local animal shelter (in Texas) had an auction, we made a bunch of candles to sell to profit the animal shelter. We sold all the candles and kept getting requests to make more. Whaala!”

3. Grand Candles

Grand Candles keeps their shop relatively simple. The candle making business features soy wax in a single sized jar. Scents include combinations like coconut + lime and lilac + rose.

4. Baum Designs

Baum Designs sells candles along with other gift items like signs and coasters. The candle you buy can be personalized. And many offer a dose of humor. For example, one reads “light when [name] farts.”

5. OUU Shop

OUU Shop offers soy candles and other personalized favors like honey jars and wax melts. Products include a minimalist design. But some sets can also be personalized, like adding a couple’s names and wedding date to use as favors for guests.

6. New Moon Beginnings

New Moon Beginnings offers candles, crystals, incense, jewelry, and similar items in its business. The candles are infused with crystals to provide a beautiful look and unique energy.

7. Name of Candle Business

The Canary’s Nest offers soy candles and wax melts made in South Georgia. The candle making business offers classic scents as well as seasonal options. For example, in the fall, the shop features products like apple cider donuts and pecan pumpkin.

8. Modern Forestry

Modern Forestry specializes in mason jar candles and wax melts. The business has a generally rustic feel with cedar wicks and designs inspired by the forest. Scents include things like maple bourbon and honeysuckle.

9. Sandy Land Studio

Sandy Land Studio offers soy candles, soaps, and bath salts. The candles in this business are sold in glass jars and tealights. They include scents like magnolia and sandalwood and come in a variety of colors.

10. Mia’s Co.

Mia’s Co. shop features the tagline, “a candle for every memory.” Scents include classics like grapefruit and lavender. And each jar is numbered and comes with a modern design.

11. Mind Your Own Beeswax LLC

Mind Your Own Beeswax sells — you guessed it: beeswax candles. The candle making business sells candles in sets like their self-care package. They also offer wholesale orders if you want to start selling candles in your business.

12. Anchored Northwest

Anchored Northwest sells rustic candles with wood wicks and unique containers. The business doesn’t just sell candles on Etsy. They also have wholesale accounts with various retailers, selling candles in more than 300 locations around the U.S. and Canada.

Owners Brian and Megan offered the following tips to prospective candle sellers, “We have worked countless hours over the past 2 years, but found that photography is key. Never be afraid to give away a product for free or in exchange for exposure. And finally…develop a wholesale business that will get you in front of many different boutiques, gift shops, et. Abound and Faire are great places to start.

They added, “Be sure your product is different from everyone else’s. For us, wood wicks and our fun, unique candle names have set us apart. Not to mention our widely popular and rarely seen Rustic Vintage container.”

13. Get a Whiff Co.

Get a Whiff Co. offers wood wick candles that come with a rustic design. Many include fairly masculine or woodsy fragrances like tobacco & honey and leather & smoke.

14. Cesarah’s Creations

Cesarah’s Creations offers soy candles with a unique twist. Each comes in a glass jar. But in addition to the soy and wick, they include extras accents. For example, the pumpkin spice candle includes small pieces of cinnamon stick, herbs, and crystals.

15. Mainely Candles

Mainely Candles specializes in soy wax candles from Maine. The candle making business is mainly full of seasonal scents like Maine Maple Sunday and Autumn Harvest.

16. Bluewine Studio

Bluewine Studio’s candles go beyond the simple glass jars or containers. Some are shaped into molds like seashells. Others contain little decorations like cereal pieces in the shop’s cereal scented candles.

17. Embers and Roots

Embers and Roots offers ethical soy candles in amber glass jars. Each one can come with a personalized message, like those for birthdays or weddings.

18. Bees Light Candles

Bees Light Candles offers beeswax candles. The product line includes pillar candles, tealights, and those shaped into unique items like pinecones.

19. Alder and Loam

Alder and Loam offers soy candles with minimalist designs. Scents include simple options like rose, woods, and lavender.

20. Cosmic Moon Sisters

Cosmic Moon Sisters specializes in candles with a magical twist. Some include galaxy colors. Others come in apothecary jars. And some are even infused with flowers.

21. Always Rich Creations

Always Rich Creations offers soy candles in various collections, from Key West delight to fresh linen. The candles are colorful as well as scented.

22. Wax on Fire

Wax on Fire offers soy wax candles with a humorous twist. Some also include messages for special occasions, like weddings and birthdays. For example, some include “will you be my bridesmaid?” messages.

23. Wildflower By Anna

Wildflower By Anna includes an array of sustainable products, including candles, skincare products, and soap. The candle making business owner simply creates products she’d like to see on store shelves.

She told Small Business Trends, “I have always been on the lookout for sustainable products but they were often too expensive so I took upon myself to research and create the types of products I love, that are sustainable, beautiful and affordable and I’ve been overwhelmed by how they’ve been received by customers.”

24. Craft Aromas

Craft Aromas offers soy candles inspired by nature. They include wood wicks and frosted glass jars. The product line includes scents like lavender nightshade and heirloom pumpkin.

25. Ordinary Day Studio

Ordinary Day Studio has candles inspired by mood and art. The product line includes options like amber sandalwood tobacco and Kentucky bourbon. Products can also be personalized. And the shop also sells DIY kits.

26. Bubble Yum Candles

Bubble Yum Candles offers candles, lip balm, wax melts, and room sprays. Some products include lifelike shapes like cinnamon buns. Others are infused with extras like bubblegum.

27. Wax Farm Candles

Wax Farm Candles offers jar candles made with essential oils. Each jar is wrapped with a printed design to make them stand out visually.

28. Sixth Spice

Sixth Spice sells eco-friendly natural products, including candles and skincare. The product line includes scents like lavender and lemon and roses in the woods.

29. Green Earth Stones

Green Earth Stones offers handcrafted candles and crystals. The scents include options like dragon’s blood and raven to go with the theme of the shop.

30. Peace Organics

Peace Organics provides soy candle and gift boxes with a magical twist. The jars include visuals like skulls and birds rather than simple labels that include the scent of each candle.

How do I start a candle business?

Before starting a business, you need to choose a niche and name that will help you stand out. For example, some companies specialize in making them eco-friendly. Others want to make decorative candles for wedding centerpieces. You can even make candles with funny names. Start by finding a name that describes your offerings. Once you do that, you need to reserve a website, Etsy page, and social media accounts for your candle business.

You also need to source material when you start manufacturing candles. This may include soy, beeswax, gel, wicks, scents, dyes, glass jars, labels, and packaging supplies. After you get started, practice and perfect your techniques as you develop a line of scents or specific products. Many candle makers simply run their business from their own kitchen or home office. Home candlemaking generally requires a stovetop to heat soy or wax. Then you can set up everything you need for manufacturing on your countertops.

Then it’s time to set up your Etsy shop, website, or decide where else to sell your candles. For example, you can research local gift shops to form wholesale relationships with or craft fairs throughout the year. You can sell products using multiple methods. Then make sure you market your business on social media, online ads, or promoted product listings. Branding candles with logos and other design elements are also essential.

As you run your shop, you’ll need to make systems for managing finances and continually updating your product listings. You also have to keep making more to support your inventory. And make sure to invest in shipping supplies to get your products safely to your customers.

Business owners can learn even more about starting a candle business at the links below:

How much does it cost to make a candle?

The exact cost of candle making depends on the supplies you choose and the amount you’re making at once. It is generally cheaper to produce them in bulk than to make a single candle. For example, making one candle may cost around $5 to $6. This means you need to start buying your supplies in bulk. If you purchase enough products to create a batch of 12 or more candles, each one may only cost around $0.50 to produce. Additionally, home candle making helps business owners keep overhead costs down.

Can you make good money selling candles?

Yes, you can make a profit selling candles if you work hard and price products correctly. Generally, a reasonable profit margin falls between 25 and 50 percent. However, you need to find places to sell them to consumers who are willing to pay your prices. If you do, you can start bringing in between $25,000 and $50,000 in profits.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "30 Best Candle Business Stores on Etsy" was first published on Small Business Trends



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How to Make the Best of Facebook Ad Targeting, According to HubSpot's Paid Ad Specialist

With a potential advertising reach of 1.9 billion users, Facebook is undeniably one of the most powerful platforms to market your products or services.

As an avid online shopper, I know the power of Facebook advertising firsthand. Consider, for instance, the ad I saw on my Facebook feed a few hours after completing a purchase on Free People's website:

Despite my recent Free People purchase (and dwindling clothing budget … ) I couldn't help but click. I'd just been on their website, but I hadn't seen these clothes yet.

Which leads me to my point: the power of targeted advertising.

With over 7 million advertisers on Facebook, it can be difficult for brands to stand out on Facebook amidst the masses.

Here, we'll dive into the various Facebook ad targeting options you might consider to get the highest ROI on your campaigns — plus, Facebook advertising tips from HubSpot's Paid Ads specialist, Nicole Ondracek.

Facebook Ad Targeting Options

It's important to note, you'll find all these ad targeting options within your Facebook Ads Manager. Once you begin creating a new ad campaign, you'll have the option to "Create New Audience" or "Use Saved Audience".

If you opt to create a new audience, you'll see a field for "Custom Audiences" at the top (in which you can add a custom or lookalike audience, both of which are described below), a section for demographics (including Location, Age, Gender, and Languages), and sections for more detailed targeting or connections.

1. Demographic

Demographic Facebook ad targeting options include the opportunity to segment your audience(s) based on age, location, language, work, education, and more. If you sell a product or service that pertains primarily to a certain demographic, this is a good ad targeting option for you.

For instance, maybe your audience is primarily millennial females, people who work in the medical industry, or anyone who lives in Spain — all of these factors can help you hyper-target to ensure you're reaching the prospects who are most willing to buy your product or service based on an ad they see on Facebook.

2. Interests

Consider how much you're able to learn about someone from their Facebook activity.

For instance, in the last six months I've Liked pages of various restaurants in Boston, MA; I've watched yoga videos via Facebook Live; and I've shopped for clothing on Facebook Marketplace. 

All of these activities suggest the types of hobbies I'm interested in, and, tangentially, what types of products or services I'd be interested in purchasing.

Perhaps you sell a product or service that doesn't pertain to an audience's demographic as much as it pertains to an audiences' interests.

A good example of this? Workout gear. Sure, you can guess that your audience is primarily 20 to 30-year-old women, for instance, but a more powerful opportunity for targeting would simply be to target anyone who's Liked fitness pages, or engaged with fitness videos, over the last couple months.

3. Behavior

There are plenty of user behaviors you'd want to keep track of before sending a Facebook ad their way — for instance, consider my example earlier, in which I'd shopped on Free People's website before receiving a Free People ad on Facebook.

Additionally, it's often most effective to target prospects who've already shown interest in your brand. For instance, you might find your Facebook ads perform better with audiences who've already read some of your blog posts or followed you on social media.

Ultimately, "behavior" can help you target audiences who've consumed certain types of content, visited certain websites, used certain browsers or devices, or even donated to certain charities.

This is a particularly good targeting option for ecommerce re-engagement ads, in which you display ads to users who've added items to their check-out cart on your website. Alternatively, you might consider serving ads to users who've visited a certain landing page on your website.

4. Connections

If you have a specific page, app, or event listed on Facebook that attracts visitors to whom you'd like to serve ads, you're in luck. With "Connections", you can do exactly that.

For instance, let's say you recently held a networking event and added 300+ users to the event-specific Facebook page — after-the-fact, you might consider sending specific ads towards those users, who are now more aware of your brand and likely interested in your offerings.

Additionally, you can expand your ad's potential by sending the ad to friends of people who've attended your event, as well.

5. Custom Audiences

If you already have a good list of leads in your database and want to reach them on Facebook, you could simply create a Custom Audience to attract and convert those leads.

A Custom Audience enables you to provide specific information you've gathered about your leads, such as a phone number or email, and then target those leads with ads.

This is a good targeting option if your goal is to up-sell to existing customers. For instance, perhaps you have a database of customers who currently use your product, but you've recently released new features in a Professional version.

One of the best opportunities to attract and convert existing customers is to use Custom Audiences to serve your Professional-product Facebook ads to those customers already in your database.

 

6. Lookalike Audiences

Lookalike Audiences is a fantastic opportunity to perform cold outreach towards prospects who look similar to your existing prospects and customers. As the name implies, Lookalike Audiences allows you to target ads towards users who match similar characteristics to people who've shown interest in your brand.

To further understand what it means for an audience to "look" like your existing database, consider the following example: let's say you upload your email subscriber list to Facebook as a custom audience.

Facebook then identifies the following consistent features about your list: users are primarily in their mid-to-late thirties, they live in the United States, they work in banking, and they've shown an interest in travel.

Facebook could then find users on Facebook who match all of these qualifications, since users with those criteria seem most interested in what your brand has to offer.

Similar to Custom Audiences, you'll need to upload a custom audience for Lookalike Audiences to work — for instance, perhaps you upload a list of email subscribers, event attendees, or website visitors.

Facebook Ad Targeting Tips

1. Repurpose your highest-performing content as a Facebook ad.

If you have a few high-performing pieces of content that already attract and convert leads, why not put some paid ad spend behind it?

We've seen success with this strategy at HubSpot. For instance, each quarter I send a list of top-performing and high-converting content to the paid ad team, and they reformat it into an advertisement for Facebook.

Ondracek adds, "This can apply to different goals throughout a customer's lifecycle. For example, if our goal is to drive more brand awareness to our site, we'll test a blog post that generates a large amount of site traffic. On the other hand, if our goal is more focused on generating leads and submissions, we'll instead test a high-converting content offer, since we care more about conversions than traffic."

Ondracek told me, "It's all about finding the right content that matches up to your campaign objective."

Of course, not every piece of content that performs well organically will perform well as a social ad, which is why you want to be highly selective and pay attention to metrics like social media views when choosing posts.

But, nonetheless, choosing these high-performers is a good starting point and ensures you're providing new audiences with content that already delights your existing audience.

2. Retarget ads to prospects most likely to convert.

With Facebook advertising, you're able to target prospects who've already shown interest in your content, which could be more effective than cold-targeting Facebook users who haven't shown any interest in your brand.

With retargeting, you can send ads towards prospects who've already watched a product demo, interacted with a blog post, or downloaded an ebook — which are all signs they're intrigued by your brand and could be interested in learning more.

For instance, let's say you work in the ecommerce industry and sell athletic apparel. You might consider creating a gated video on fitness tips from top health experts. Once you've collected an email list of users who've downloaded that video, you can target a follow-up "Top Workout Routines" Facebook to those same video viewers.

Ondracek says, "Retargeting is a really powerful approach, and we've found it works best when used to go after an audience similar to the seed list. For example, we've seen success retargeting visitors who have previously visited our pricing page with direct response product ads since they're already in that consideration stage and more likely to buy.

She adds, "On the flip side, when we tried retargeting awareness video ad viewers with these types of down funnel ads, we saw worse performance since these two audiences have completely different behaviors."

Of course, it's vital to note, you'll want to retarget ads that align well with your products or services. If people have shown interest in content that isn't high-converting and doesn't align with your product, you likely don't want to retarget those viewers, since there's no evidence they'll turn into qualified leads.

3. Leverage existing fans of your business.

Similar to the tip above, it's often more worthwhile to target users who've demonstrated their appreciation for your brand by liking your Facebook's business Page. Consider how you might convert those users by retargeting ads towards them.

For instance, Facebook Ads expert Jon Loomer found his ads ROI increased dramatically when he targeted fans, rather than non-fans. In fact, his fan-targeted ads returned 129 conversions and resulted in $9,481.50 in revenue — 45.9X ROI. When he targeted non-fans, he didn't convert at all.

Image Source

Ultimately, it's much less obtrusive to target ads towards people who want to see content from your brand and have demonstrated an interest in your company. Save time and money by targeting your brand's fans first.

Additionally, Ondracek told me, "You can also get creative and try layering on some criteria here. For example, you could try targeting fans of your page who haven’t purchased a product to try and influence some buying power. Or on the other hand, you could try targeting fans who have previously purchased a product if you sell something that can be purchased multiple times —like clothing in the FreePeople ad."

4. Take advantage of custom audiences to up-sell and build loyalty with existing customers.

Targeting Facebook ads isn't just effective for attracting new prospects to your business — it's also a good strategy for retaining and up-selling your existing customers.

And, considering it's 5-25X more expensive to acquire a new customer than it is to retain an existing one, it makes sense to leverage the customers in your database already rather than only sending ads to brand-new prospects.

To up-sell via Facebook ads, think about your existing customers who might benefit from an additional feature, product, or service that you can offer them. For instance, perhaps you've just released new features on a Pro version of your product. More than likely, users of your free or beginner product would be interested in learning about those features, particularly if they're enjoying your product and considering an upgrade.

Alternatively, maybe you simply want to target helpful content towards existing customers to increase brand loyalty. You might consider creating a Custom Audience list of customers who've read your social media blog posts, for instance, and then serve ads on your upcoming social media webinar to that audience.

5. Create lookalikes of top-performing audiences to keep improving upon what works best.

Ondracek suggests that, once you find an audience that works well following the tips above, you can always create a lookalike of the same audience.

She says, "If, for example, you find targeting people who like your page works best, you can create a Lookalike of this same audience to test. This new audience allows you to expand your reach to new prospects and might even perform better."

Additionally, Ondracek told me, "At HubSpot, we tend to see the most positive results and improvements when testing with Lookalike Audiences. As digital platforms become more and more automated, you'll find yourself having to put more faith into the algorithms."

"And what's pretty cool is that these algorithms tend to work! When you upload a list of customers to Facebook and create a lookalike from them, Facebook's algorithm is going to do its best to target your ads to people most similar to your existing customers." 

Ondracek adds that you'll want to make sure you have some conversion tracking setup on your campaigns, so that Facebook will be able to tell who's actually converting and optimize to find more people similar to those users.

Of course, if you don't have enough data or conversions for the system to optimize, it's going to be harder for this approach to work — which is why you'll want to aim to run an audience test for at least two weeks, so there's enough data to work with.

Additionally, Ondracek says, "What's also great about Lookalikes is that if you find a Lookalike audience performing well, you can increase the size of it to test if a larger audience performs better or worse than a smaller one. In the Facebook interface, you have the option to test between 1-10% Lookalike audiences. The smaller the size, the more similar the audience is supposed to be to your seed list."

6. Keep an eye out for frequency.

Finally, when targeting your ads, you'll want to keep an eye on the frequency metric to make sure someone isn’t seeing your ad too often.

Ondracek advises, "If the frequency is too high, you risk hurting your brand perception. We can all name that one brand we see way too many ads for. On the other hand, it can be beneficial for someone to see your ad more than once to increase your brand awareness. You'll have to play around with a sweet spot that works best for your company, but aiming for a frequency of 3-4 can be a good place to start."

Ondracek adds, "If you do start to see the frequency increase, there are a few ways to solve for this. First, you can create a larger-sized lookalike audience as mentioned above, which will expand your reach. Second, you can create new custom audiences to add to your campaign. And, finally, you can add in interest or behavioral targeting since those are large pools of audiences to begin with."

"Additionally, you can swap out with new creative so the same audience is at least seeing some new fresher content."

"One of the most exciting parts of paid advertising is being able to continuously test and find what works best. There are so many different options and ways to target, so if you find an audience not working, don’t be afraid to try a new one."

Undoubtedly, there are endless opportunities for increasing customer lifetime value by retargeting Facebook ads in an effort to demonstrate your brand's empathy and commitment to helping customers with all their various needs.



via Business Feeds

30 Best Candle Business Stores on Etsy

30 Best Candle Business Stores on Etsy

Americans spend more than $3 billion on candles each year. This means that candle making can be a profitable endeavor for those interested in starting a business.

In fact, some entrepreneurs can earn a decent living by making them right in their own homes. You can then sell them at local craft fairs or retail stores. Or you can get started quickly using marketplace sites like Etsy.

Candle Businesses on Etsy

If you want to start a business around candle making, from home or elsewhere, it’s time to gather some inspiration from other sellers. These candle businesses have made a name for themselves on Etsy.

1. Frostbeard

Frostbeard is full of soy candles made for book lovers. Scents include unique options like Sherlock Study and Oxford Library. Owners Roxie and Tom Lubanovic started the business selling ceramics back in 2012. But they eventually shifted to candles after Roxie was unable to find bookish products elsewhere online.

2. 2 Sisters Candle Co.

The 2 Sisters Candle Co is a business that sells soy candles in various scents, like pumpkin black raspberry vanilla, ocean, and cinnamon stick. And the company is run by — you guessed it: two sisters.

Lynda Holden and her twin sister Laura started and run the business together while also babysitting their grandkids.

Holden told Small Business Trends, “We started making candles for ourselves and to give as gifts. When our local animal shelter (in Texas) had an auction, we made a bunch of candles to sell to profit the animal shelter. We sold all the candles and kept getting requests to make more. Whaala!”

3. Grand Candles

Grand Candles keeps their shop relatively simple. The candle making business features soy wax in a single sized jar. Scents include combinations like coconut + lime and lilac + rose.

4. Baum Designs

Baum Designs sells candles along with other gift items like signs and coasters. The candle you buy can be personalized. And many offer a dose of humor. For example, one reads “light when [name] farts.”

5. OUU Shop

OUU Shop offers soy candles and other personalized favors like honey jars and wax melts. Products include a minimalist design. But some sets can also be personalized, like adding a couple’s names and wedding date to use as favors for guests.

6. New Moon Beginnings

New Moon Beginnings offers candles, crystals, incense, jewelry, and similar items in its business. The candles are infused with crystals to provide a beautiful look and unique energy.

7. Name of Candle Business

The Canary’s Nest offers soy candles and wax melts made in South Georgia. The candle making business offers classic scents as well as seasonal options. For example, in the fall, the shop features products like apple cider donuts and pecan pumpkin.

8. Modern Forestry

Modern Forestry specializes in mason jar candles and wax melts. The business has a generally rustic feel with cedar wicks and designs inspired by the forest. Scents include things like maple bourbon and honeysuckle.

9. Sandy Land Studio

Sandy Land Studio offers soy candles, soaps, and bath salts. The candles in this business are sold in glass jars and tealights. They include scents like magnolia and sandalwood and come in a variety of colors.

10. Mia’s Co.

Mia’s Co. shop features the tagline, “a candle for every memory.” Scents include classics like grapefruit and lavender. And each jar is numbered and comes with a modern design.

11. Mind Your Own Beeswax LLC

Mind Your Own Beeswax sells — you guessed it: beeswax candles. The candle making business sells candles in sets like their self-care package. They also offer wholesale orders if you want to start selling candles in your business.

12. Anchored Northwest

Anchored Northwest sells rustic candles with wood wicks and unique containers. The business doesn’t just sell candles on Etsy. They also have wholesale accounts with various retailers, selling candles in more than 300 locations around the U.S. and Canada.

Owners Brian and Megan offered the following tips to prospective candle sellers, “We have worked countless hours over the past 2 years, but found that photography is key. Never be afraid to give away a product for free or in exchange for exposure. And finally…develop a wholesale business that will get you in front of many different boutiques, gift shops, et. Abound and Faire are great places to start.

They added, “Be sure your product is different from everyone else’s. For us, wood wicks and our fun, unique candle names have set us apart. Not to mention our widely popular and rarely seen Rustic Vintage container.”

13. Get a Whiff Co.

Get a Whiff Co. offers wood wick candles that come with a rustic design. Many include fairly masculine or woodsy fragrances like tobacco & honey and leather & smoke.

14. Cesarah’s Creations

Cesarah’s Creations offers soy candles with a unique twist. Each comes in a glass jar. But in addition to the soy and wick, they include extras accents. For example, the pumpkin spice candle includes small pieces of cinnamon stick, herbs, and crystals.

15. Mainely Candles

Mainely Candles specializes in soy wax candles from Maine. The candle making business is mainly full of seasonal scents like Maine Maple Sunday and Autumn Harvest.

16. Bluewine Studio

Bluewine Studio’s candles go beyond the simple glass jars or containers. Some are shaped into molds like seashells. Others contain little decorations like cereal pieces in the shop’s cereal scented candles.

17. Embers and Roots

Embers and Roots offers ethical soy candles in amber glass jars. Each one can come with a personalized message, like those for birthdays or weddings.

18. Bees Light Candles

Bees Light Candles offers beeswax candles. The product line includes pillar candles, tealights, and those shaped into unique items like pinecones.

19. Alder and Loam

Alder and Loam offers soy candles with minimalist designs. Scents include simple options like rose, woods, and lavender.

20. Cosmic Moon Sisters

Cosmic Moon Sisters specializes in candles with a magical twist. Some include galaxy colors. Others come in apothecary jars. And some are even infused with flowers.

21. Always Rich Creations

Always Rich Creations offers soy candles in various collections, from Key West delight to fresh linen. The candles are colorful as well as scented.

22. Wax on Fire

Wax on Fire offers soy wax candles with a humorous twist. Some also include messages for special occasions, like weddings and birthdays. For example, some include “will you be my bridesmaid?” messages.

23. Wildflower By Anna

Wildflower By Anna includes an array of sustainable products, including candles, skincare products, and soap. The candle making business owner simply creates products she’d like to see on store shelves.

She told Small Business Trends, “I have always been on the lookout for sustainable products but they were often too expensive so I took upon myself to research and create the types of products I love, that are sustainable, beautiful and affordable and I’ve been overwhelmed by how they’ve been received by customers.”

24. Craft Aromas

Craft Aromas offers soy candles inspired by nature. They include wood wicks and frosted glass jars. The product line includes scents like lavender nightshade and heirloom pumpkin.

25. Ordinary Day Studio

Ordinary Day Studio has candles inspired by mood and art. The product line includes options like amber sandalwood tobacco and Kentucky bourbon. Products can also be personalized. And the shop also sells DIY kits.

26. Bubble Yum Candles

Bubble Yum Candles offers candles, lip balm, wax melts, and room sprays. Some products include lifelike shapes like cinnamon buns. Others are infused with extras like bubblegum.

27. Wax Farm Candles

Wax Farm Candles offers jar candles made with essential oils. Each jar is wrapped with a printed design to make them stand out visually.

28. Sixth Spice

Sixth Spice sells eco-friendly natural products, including candles and skincare. The product line includes scents like lavender and lemon and roses in the woods.

29. Green Earth Stones

Green Earth Stones offers handcrafted candles and crystals. The scents include options like dragon’s blood and raven to go with the theme of the shop.

30. Peace Organics

Peace Organics provides soy candle and gift boxes with a magical twist. The jars include visuals like skulls and birds rather than simple labels that include the scent of each candle.

How do I start a candle business?

Before starting a business, you need to choose a niche and name that will help you stand out. For example, some companies specialize in making them eco-friendly. Others want to make decorative candles for wedding centerpieces. You can even make candles with funny names. Start by finding a name that describes your offerings. Once you do that, you need to reserve a website, Etsy page, and social media accounts for your candle business.

You also need to source material when you start manufacturing candles. This may include soy, beeswax, gel, wicks, scents, dyes, glass jars, labels, and packaging supplies. After you get started, practice and perfect your techniques as you develop a line of scents or specific products. Many candle makers simply run their business from their own kitchen or home office. Home candlemaking generally requires a stovetop to heat soy or wax. Then you can set up everything you need for manufacturing on your countertops.

Then it’s time to set up your Etsy shop, website, or decide where else to sell your candles. For example, you can research local gift shops to form wholesale relationships with or craft fairs throughout the year. You can sell products using multiple methods. Then make sure you market your business on social media, online ads, or promoted product listings. Branding candles with logos and other design elements are also essential.

As you run your shop, you’ll need to make systems for managing finances and continually updating your product listings. You also have to keep making more to support your inventory. And make sure to invest in shipping supplies to get your products safely to your customers.

Business owners can learn even more about starting a candle business at the links below:

How much does it cost to make a candle?

The exact cost of candle making depends on the supplies you choose and the amount you’re making at once. It is generally cheaper to produce them in bulk than to make a single candle. For example, making one candle may cost around $5 to $6. This means you need to start buying your supplies in bulk. If you purchase enough products to create a batch of 12 or more candles, each one may only cost around $0.50 to produce. Additionally, home candle making helps business owners keep overhead costs down.

Can you make good money selling candles?

Yes, you can make a profit selling candles if you work hard and price products correctly. Generally, a reasonable profit margin falls between 25 and 50 percent. However, you need to find places to sell them to consumers who are willing to pay your prices. If you do, you can start bringing in between $25,000 and $50,000 in profits.

Image: Depositphotos.com

This article, "30 Best Candle Business Stores on Etsy" was first published on Small Business Trends



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